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    $6.75
    1. Transcend 4 GB Class 6 SDHC Flash
    $26.99
    2. Transcend 16 GB Class 10 SDHC
    $26.99
    3. Transcend 16GB Class 10 SDHC Card
    $13.60
    4. Transcend 8 GB Class 6 SDHC Flash
    $13.60
    5. Transcend 8 GB Class 6 SDHC Flash
    $22.95
    6. Lexar SDHC 4 GB Class 6 Flash
    $2.38
    7. Sandisk 4GB Secure Digital SD
    $6.88
    8. Kingston 4 GB Class 4 SDHC Flash
    $6.88
    9. Kingston 4 GB Class 4 SDHC Flash
    $0.01
    10. 3 Pack of Premium Crystal Clear
    $99.99
    11. Roku XDS Streaming Player 1080p
    $104.99
    12. Western Digital WD Elements 2
    $0.01
    13. 3 Pack of Universal Touch Screen
    $19.21
    14. Sony 4 GB Memory Stick PRO Duo
    $76.47
    15. Western Digital WD Elements 1
    $6.70
    16. SanDisk 8 GB Class 2 SDHC Flash
    $85.00
    17. My Passport Essential 500 GB USB
    $19.49
    18. SanDisk 16 GB Class 2 microSDHC
    Too low to display
    19. OtterBox Defender Case for iPhone
    $49.99
    20. Otterbox APL2-iPAD1-20-C4OTR iPad

    1. Transcend 4 GB Class 6 SDHC Flash Memory Card TS4GSDHC6E
    Electronics
    -- our price: $6.75
    (price subject to change: see help)
    Asin: B001ECRZJM
    Manufacturer: TRANSCEND
    Average Customer Review: 4.2 out of 5 stars
    US | Canada | United Kingdom | Germany | France | Japan

    Editorial Review

    Fully Compatible with SDA 2.0 specification. Suitable for SDHC compliant devices, MLC flash chip with High Speed transfer rate. Perfect for highend digital devices. Please make sure your device can support SDHC format before you purchase! SDHC host devices can use both SD and SDHC memory cards. ... Read more

    Reviews

    5-0 out of 5 stars Great affordable SDHC card, March 28, 2008
    In the past, I bought a Transcend 8GB SDHC card for my Canon SD1000 camera. I recently bought the Transcend 16GB SDHC for my new Canon SX20IS. Both cards work very well and I've had no problems with it so far. I wanted to take this opportunity to update my review since my original review was also posted (by Amazon) for the 16GB card. This is because the only difference between these two cards is the different capacity. So, if you're in the market for an affordable high quality SDHC card, this may be the one for you. Sorry, I kind of sounded like a used car salesman right there, didn't I? I assure you that I don't work for Transcend. But, here's why I think this card is awesome:

    Pros:

    -Affordable!

    -Large capacity

    -Class 6 read/write speed (which is very fast... but is no longer the fastest class available)

    -Lifetime warranty (at least that's what the package says :)

    -Transcend is a reputable company that's been making memory products for a very long time. ( I swear to the tech Gods that I don't work for them!) Other reputable and reliable memory card companies include Kingston and PNY. All three of these companies have been making memory chips for many, many years.


    Cons:

    - I can' really think of any "Cons" about this card. But here's the 2 closest things I can come up with right now: (1) "Class 6" is no longer the fastest speed available and (2) This card does NOT make coffee for you in the morning, do your dishes for you, give you compliments when you're having a bad day, or magically improve your photography skills.




    IMPORTANT SPECIAL NOTES ABOUT SDHC MEMORY CARDS:

    -SDHC cards are not compatible with most older SD cameras, SD devices, or SD card readers.

    -SDHC cards are rated by speed using different "classes". There are currently 4 data transfer speed classes available for SDHC cards. These classes are "class 2, class 4, and class 6, and the new class 10. For example, "Class 2" would have the slowest read/write speed while "Class 6" has the fastest read/write speed. So if you have a device in which speed may play a crucial role, make sure you buy a higher "class" SDHC card. Please note that this SDHC card no longer has the fastest read/write speed available. There is now a new class, called "Class 10". Class 6 has a minimum read/write speed of 6MB/sec... while Class 2 has minimum speed rating of 2MB/sec, and Class 4 is 4MB/sec. Starting to see the pattern?


    SO WHAT'S THE DIFFERENCE BETWEEN "SD CARDS" AND "SDHC CARDS?

    SDHC is basically an upgrade to the older SD cards. The reason they upgraded it was to achieve greater data transfer speeds AND capacity than previously possible with normal SD cards... and to do this, they had to redesign the card (which is why it's not compatible with normal SD devices). This was necessary because digital cameras and digital video cameras these days have higher resolutions, which equate to larger file sizes and faster data transfer needs.

    Now that many digital cameras also can record HD video, you may consider getting a larger capacity card because video takes much more space than photos. The size of the video varies from camera to camera depending on what resolution and video compression the camera uses. If you plan on taking lots of video (especially HD video), I would consider getting at least a 16GB card. Check your camera specifications to see how many minutes per Gig of memory your camera can capture ...to gauge how big of a memory card you'll want to get to meet your needs.

    Special Note on regular SD Cards:
    If you primarily take casual photos and don't need a exceptionally fast read/write capable card, you should know that newer cameras that take "SDHC" cards will also work with older normal "SD" cards. These older cards are cheaper than the new SDHC cards, so this may be something to consider. So to sum things up, newer cameras will take SDHC and regular SD cards, but older cameras that use SD cards may not be able to use SDHC cards. This is because newer technology is usually made to be compatible with older technology (the technical term used to describe this is "backwards compatibility") ... but older technology may not have the hardware necessary to run newer tech (technical term used is "obsolete"... just kidding! ;)

    I hope I haven't confused everybody by going into this much detail, but I can't help being the nerd that I am. If you are confused, don't hesitate to comment on this post and I will try my best to answer your questions. Also, any feedback is always welcome!

    Conclusion: Buy the card if you have a new device that uses SDHC. It rocks! (This message has been approved by the "Duke of New Mexico")


    4-0 out of 5 stars Transcend 4 GB Class 6 SDHC Card - Good Card for SDHC Compatible Devices, May 10, 2008
    UPDATE - March 2, 2010: This review was originally written for the 4 GB class 6 SDHC card, but the reviews have been grouped for all class 6 SDHC cards in the 4, 8, 16 and 32 GB sizes. All the cards should perform similarly since they are all class 6 and all made by Transcend. However, I will have to check which cards I have used hands on. I believe I only own the 4GB and 8GB cards. I will update the review further. If you have concerns regarding the 16GB or 32GB sizes, you should seek out the reviews tagged with the product links from those cards.


    The Transcend 4GB SDHC CARD (Class 6) is a great card for the price. I was at first a little skeptical about the brand, but I buy way too many memory cards to ignore a good price when I see one. And I'm happy to report that I've experienced decent performance and reliability issues with this card. That's as compared to other cards I own including SanDisk, PNY and Kingston.

    As long as your devices are compatible with the SDHC format, this card is a good buy. 4 GB is a nice size though I do prefer 8 GB capacity for high capacity storage.

    The class 6 speed is the fastest speed available in mass market SDHC cards. Class 6 guarantees minimum transfer speeds of 6 MBs, but I've gotten speeds up to 20Mbs! That makes this card perfect for storing pictures in RAW image formats.

    The Class 6 speed is on par with the Sandisk Extreme III cards that on average are about $15 to $20 more per card. If you don't have an SDHC reader, you may opt to get the package with a reader included to download your pics. If not you can just transfer your pics directly from your camera with your card still inserted. An SDHC card reader can be bought separately if your PC doesn't have a compatible slot.

    General SDHC and SD Card Tips

    There are a few tips that I've learned the hard way through buying TOO MANY different memory cards.
    1. Make sure your device is compatible with the card! Even in regular SD cards, some older electronics aren't compatible with that large of a size (2 GB). In terms of SDHC cards, make sure your camera or other device is SDHC compatible. SDHC is different from regular SD and only newer devices tend to have built-in compatibility
    2. Once you install this in your camera or device, you will generally want to format the card with your compatible device's interface. That is because the standard formats for certain devices, particularly Canon, are different from the factory installed format
    3. Just like your devices, most computer SD card readers are not compatible with the SDHC format. So use a card reader or download the pictures via USB connection to the camera with the card still installed.
    4. For some reason, placing the card in the locked position allows some older laptops to still read it. This is just to be used in a pinch however, and it won't apply to all systems
    5. If you did not properly format your card, you may be able to save things to it and then have them "disappear." If this happens to you, make sure you use the software recovery tools BEFORE you try to save anything else to your card. That way, you can retrieve your images without over-writing them.
    6. Make sure you know what you are going to use this card for. Once you have set up everything and ensured it's all compatible, you still have to decide on speed. If you are using this for storing RAW images instead of JPEGs or HD video, step up to the faster class 6 speed format if you can afford it.
    7. If you are going to pay more for a faster speed, make sure your device can benefit from it. I've read, for example, that Kodak cameras are set to a fixed voltage and cannot go faster than standard speed. So the extra cash spent on Class 4, 5, or 6 is basically wasted.

    Conclusion

    It's great to have several extra cards on hand just in case. This 4 GB card is a nice performer. If you have a high capacity camera (10 Megapixels or more) and are storing videos or RAW images, the extra cash for the 8GB card is worth it. Or you may want to step up to the larger 16 GB size that is now available.

    Enjoy!

    4-0 out of 5 stars Transcend 32 GB SDHC Review, May 25, 2009
    Before you drop 120~$ for a SD card ask yourself, Do you really need 32GB card? because the card itself with same specs costs only 35$ for the 16GB version, anyway here is info that might help you

    Pros :
    1- Class 6 Card the(guaranteed minimum Read/write speed of 6MB/s)
    2- My Test Results 18.2-18.5MB/S Read - 11.6-11.8 Write (very stable)
    3- Faster than average cards and almost close to top speed SDHC cards
    4- 32GB in a single small chip is awesome(You can use it as a portable HD once in a while, i share some stuff with my friends with it sometimes


    Cons :
    1- Expensive
    2- You can get two 16GB cards for around only 70$ and save yourself 50$~
    3- Slow write speeds for a 32GB card (Takes forever to fill it with DATA from PC, its not the card fault though , its just the SDHC technology is getting old and slow for 2009 standards , time for newer Tech)

    * Important Info

    Avoid the Sandisk Ultra Series they never reach the true marketed speed "15MB-20MB/S" its just in theory speed like how everybody knows that USB2 is much slower than its specs, and they are only Class 2 for the 32GB version which will drop frames from your HD video (Plus Class 4 is minimum requirement for shooting in HD ) if you plan to get San disk Card then get the Extreme III Series (but again from my own Tests there read speed is about 20MB not 30MB and the write speed is 14MB/s~ instead of the transcend 11MB/s write speed (Unless you spam shooting pictures with your DSLR you don't "need" faster speed)

    I bought This card because i plan to take videos with my HD camcorder that last more 2 Hours, if you do not plan to shoot for longtime then you are better with getting the 16GB card HOWEVER, if you are lazy like my mom and do not plan to transfer DATA from the card to Your computer HD after every trip, then get the 32GB card.or you gonna end up on a trip and a message pops "No memory"

    If you plan to shoot for longer time, check your camcorder battery too does it even last that long? so be sure about that before you drop over 100$ for this card

    1-0 out of 5 stars product failed., July 26, 2009
    Well, it was great while it lasted. Unfortunately, it did not last long.

    Like other reviewers, after <20 use cycles the device failed and I got a "lock" error when, in fact, the write-protection lock was not engaged. Oddly, by engaging the lock (i.e. entering read-only mode) I was able to remove the picture files from the card. Obviously, further use in the camera was impossible; I was also unable to reformat the card (either with my camera or with the SD Associations free software [..]).

    This card has a high average rating but I would urge customers to consider the number of 1-star ratings due to complete product failure before they purchase this item.



    5-0 out of 5 stars My Canon loves the 8 GB SDHC card, January 15, 2008
    I recently purchased a Canon Powershot A720IS digital camera that is capable of recognizing and using up to 2 TERRABYTES of memory card (in the future) so I wanted to get the largest memory card I could install for now. I wanted to use the camera both on dry land and with an underwater housing for shooting stills and video on dive trips. Camera specs said an 8 GB SDHC card would record one hour of hi res video at 30 fps. Or nearly 2300 hi res stills at 8 megapixels.

    A test of the Transcend 8GB SDHC card in the camera ended up shooting 70 minutes of full screen, 30fps digital video that could not be distinguished from my DV camcorder video quality. Playback from the memory card to the TV was so fast & efficient there was never a single "stutter" on the screen. The card speed is genuinely FAST as advertised. Low level formatting of the card allowed for very acceptable rapid-fire sequential still photo shooting speeds when light levels were bright enough that the flash was not needed/used. Something like 2 photos every 3 seconds. Files were flawless in display, both for stills and video.

    This product was significantly lower in price than the Kingston 8GB SDHC card I originally bought with the camera. I've used both interchangeably and cannot see any different in the speed or capacity and quality of imagery is identical. For the money I'll stick with Transcend and am looking forward to getting their 16GB card once the price drops substantially below the $100 mark. That would provide nearly 2 1/2 hours of video on my still camera or 4600 highest quality stills. I'm afraid my camcorder will be collecting dust much of the time. A big advantage to video on the card is there are NO MOVING PARTS, e.g. a mini DV tape cassette and camcorder or VCR playback unit needed to dump the video and stills to my Mac for editing and burning DVDs. I just stick the card in the MicroMate USB card reader, plug it in the computer and bingo, ready to sort thru and dump to the hard drive. Since the card is formatted by a Canon camera it automatically boots up the Canon Viewer software too. That should work the same for other brands of still cameras formatting this chip.

    3-0 out of 5 stars The Fastest Card at This Price But..., June 26, 2007
    This SDHC card is the fastest one in its price range but it may cause your images to be lost.

    I use two of this in a Canon SD750. After the first use, all of the images were lost. (But thank God, I could rescue them with Lexar Image Rescue 2, a program better than its competitors) Then I formated the card(s) in the camera(s) with "low level format" option several times and there has been no problem after that so far.

    I can suggest these points to potential owners of this card:
    1- Use it very carefully, make backups if possible.
    2- Format it several times before the first use with "low level format" option.
    3- If you loose your images, don't panic. At this situation, It is very important not to take anymore pictures. If you take pictures after this point, you can overwrite your lost images and there can be no chance to get them back. Connect your card to your computer with a card reader (SDHC Compatible) and rescue them with Lexar Image Rescue.

    5-0 out of 5 stars Excellent Mini Hard Drive equivalent, December 11, 2007
    This card is able to hold a complete DVD movie, thousands of songs/photos, or just serve as a backup device for one's files.

    It operates very well - I now have purchased 3 and with each use its value becomes more apparent.

    One word of caution - even though most laptops and systems have an SD card slot, older computers may not be able to recognize or write to this card. Make sure your system has the ability to read SDHC configured products.

    If you do not have an SD slot you can purchase an tiny SD reader (very inexpensive) that plugs into your USB port.

    4-0 out of 5 stars Great value, just be careful..., January 2, 2009
    I recently ordered this card as an accessory for my Acer Aspire One netbook PC. The card took a little while to ship, about 8 days, but that wasn't a big deal. The card has lots of space, and the read speeds are quite impressive. I mostly use it to run and store portable software, and it does a very good job at that.

    My only complaint is that when I first inserted the card into my PC it attempted to install some adware. The program was from a company called RelevantKnowledge, and they gather your information for market research purposes. Luckily my spyware software picked it up immediately,so I was able to delete it. Afterward I formatted the card, and now I'm happy as can be.

    5-0 out of 5 stars Reliable card, good speeds!, December 4, 2008
    Transcend 16 GB SDHC SD Class 6 Flash Memory Card TS16GSDHC6E [Amazon Frustration-Free Packaging]
    I have 4 of these cards that I use in my Panasonic HMC-150, a professional grade video camera. I've run read/write tests on all of them and they get about 14 MB/s write speeds and 17.5 MB/s read speeds. Never encountered any errors! These cards are the best bang for your buck, and the frustration free packaging is awesome.

    1-0 out of 5 stars Don't Let This Happen to You....., August 3, 2008
    It's great to have 8GB of memory but it is a double edged sword. Today after using this card for only the second time, it failed on me. I lost almost 200 precious images - gone forever. I am what you would call an enthusiast or hobbyist. I love photography and spend every spare minute, which is very seldom these days, pursuing my passion. So I do a fair amount of experimentation. These cards are great when they work - but if they fail you even once - the results can be catastrophic. Maybe I am the unlucky 1 of 250 reviewers with a bad experience with this product, but I feel it is my responsibility to report this to everyone. I hope it never happens to you. It is human nature for me to wonder, if I had spent a few more dollars for a better brand name, would my photos be intact today?

    5-0 out of 5 stars Great affordable SDHC card, March 28, 2008
    In the past, I bought a Transcend 8GB SDHC card for my Canon SD1000 camera. I recently bought the Transcend 16GB SDHC for my new Canon SX20IS. Both cards work very well and I've had no problems with it so far. I wanted to take this opportunity to update my review since my original review was also posted (by Amazon) for the 16GB card. This is because the only difference between these two cards is the different capacity. So, if you're in the market for an affordable high quality SDHC card, this may be the one for you. Sorry, I kind of sounded like a used car salesman right there, didn't I? I assure you that I don't work for Transcend. But, here's why I think this card is awesome:

    Pros:

    -Affordable!

    -Large capacity

    -Class 6 read/write speed (which is very fast... but is no longer the fastest class available)

    -Lifetime warranty (at least that's what the package says :)

    -Transcend is a reputable company that's been making memory products for a very long time. ( I swear to the tech Gods that I don't work for them!) Other reputable and reliable memory card companies include Kingston and PNY. All three of these companies have been making memory chips for many, many years.


    Cons:

    - I can' really think of any "Cons" about this card. But here's the 2 closest things I can come up with right now: (1) "Class 6" is no longer the fastest speed available and (2) This card does NOT make coffee for you in the morning, do your dishes for you, give you compliments when you're having a bad day, or magically improve your photography skills.




    IMPORTANT SPECIAL NOTES ABOUT SDHC MEMORY CARDS:

    -SDHC cards are not compatible with most older SD cameras, SD devices, or SD card readers.

    -SDHC cards are rated by speed using different "classes". There are currently 4 data transfer speed classes available for SDHC cards. These classes are "class 2, class 4, and class 6, and the new class 10. For example, "Class 2" would have the slowest read/write speed while "Class 6" has the fastest read/write speed. So if you have a device in which speed may play a crucial role, make sure you buy a higher "class" SDHC card. Please note that this SDHC card no longer has the fastest read/write speed available. There is now a new class, called "Class 10". Class 6 has a minimum read/write speed of 6MB/sec... while Class 2 has minimum speed rating of 2MB/sec, and Class 4 is 4MB/sec. Starting to see the pattern?


    SO WHAT'S THE DIFFERENCE BETWEEN "SD CARDS" AND "SDHC CARDS?

    SDHC is basically an upgrade to the older SD cards. The reason they upgraded it was to achieve greater data transfer speeds AND capacity than previously possible with normal SD cards... and to do this, they had to redesign the card (which is why it's not compatible with normal SD devices). This was necessary because digital cameras and digital video cameras these days have higher resolutions, which equate to larger file sizes and faster data transfer needs.

    Now that many digital cameras also can record HD video, you may consider getting a larger capacity card because video takes much more space than photos. The size of the video varies from camera to camera depending on what resolution and video compression the camera uses. If you plan on taking lots of video (especially HD video), I would consider getting at least a 16GB card. Check your camera specifications to see how many minutes per Gig of memory your camera can capture ...to gauge how big of a memory card you'll want to get to meet your needs.

    Special Note on regular SD Cards:
    If you primarily take casual photos and don't need a exceptionally fast read/write capable card, you should know that newer cameras that take "SDHC" cards will also work with older normal "SD" cards. These older cards are cheaper than the new SDHC cards, so this may be something to consider. So to sum things up, newer cameras will take SDHC and regular SD cards, but older cameras that use SD cards may not be able to use SDHC cards. This is because newer technology is usually made to be compatible with older technology (the technical term used to describe this is "backwards compatibility") ... but older technology may not have the hardware necessary to run newer tech (technical term used is "obsolete"... just kidding! ;)

    I hope I haven't confused everybody by going into this much detail, but I can't help being the nerd that I am. If you are confused, don't hesitate to comment on this post and I will try my best to answer your questions. Also, any feedback is always welcome!

    Conclusion: Buy the card if you have a new device that uses SDHC. It rocks! (This message has been approved by the "Duke of New Mexico")


    4-0 out of 5 stars Transcend 4 GB Class 6 SDHC Card - Good Card for SDHC Compatible Devices, May 10, 2008
    UPDATE - March 2, 2010: This review was originally written for the 4 GB class 6 SDHC card, but the reviews have been grouped for all class 6 SDHC cards in the 4, 8, 16 and 32 GB sizes. All the cards should perform similarly since they are all class 6 and all made by Transcend. However, I will have to check which cards I have used hands on. I believe I only own the 4GB and 8GB cards. I will update the review further. If you have concerns regarding the 16GB or 32GB sizes, you should seek out the reviews tagged with the product links from those cards.


    The Transcend 4GB SDHC CARD (Class 6) is a great card for the price. I was at first a little skeptical about the brand, but I buy way too many memory cards to ignore a good price when I see one. And I'm happy to report that I've experienced decent performance and reliability issues with this card. That's as compared to other cards I own including SanDisk, PNY and Kingston.

    As long as your devices are compatible with the SDHC format, this card is a good buy. 4 GB is a nice size though I do prefer 8 GB capacity for high capacity storage.

    The class 6 speed is the fastest speed available in mass market SDHC cards. Class 6 guarantees minimum transfer speeds of 6 MBs, but I've gotten speeds up to 20Mbs! That makes this card perfect for storing pictures in RAW image formats.

    The Class 6 speed is on par with the Sandisk Extreme III cards that on average are about $15 to $20 more per card. If you don't have an SDHC reader, you may opt to get the package with a reader included to download your pics. If not you can just transfer your pics directly from your camera with your card still inserted. An SDHC card reader can be bought separately if your PC doesn't have a compatible slot.

    General SDHC and SD Card Tips

    There are a few tips that I've learned the hard way through buying TOO MANY different memory cards.
    1. Make sure your device is compatible with the card! Even in regular SD cards, some older electronics aren't compatible with that large of a size (2 GB). In terms of SDHC cards, make sure your camera or other device is SDHC compatible. SDHC is different from regular SD and only newer devices tend to have built-in compatibility
    2. Once you install this in your camera or device, you will generally want to format the card with your compatible device's interface. That is because the standard formats for certain devices, particularly Canon, are different from the factory installed format
    3. Just like your devices, most computer SD card readers are not compatible with the SDHC format. So use a card reader or download the pictures via USB connection to the camera with the card still installed.
    4. For some reason, placing the card in the locked position allows some older laptops to still read it. This is just to be used in a pinch however, and it won't apply to all systems
    5. If you did not properly format your card, you may be able to save things to it and then have them "disappear." If this happens to you, make sure you use the software recovery tools BEFORE you try to save anything else to your card. That way, you can retrieve your images without over-writing them.
    6. Make sure you know what you are going to use this card for. Once you have set up everything and ensured it's all compatible, you still have to decide on speed. If you are using this for storing RAW images instead of JPEGs or HD video, step up to the faster class 6 speed format if you can afford it.
    7. If you are going to pay more for a faster speed, make sure your device can benefit from it. I've read, for example, that Kodak cameras are set to a fixed voltage and cannot go faster than standard speed. So the extra cash spent on Class 4, 5, or 6 is basically wasted.

    Conclusion

    It's great to have several extra cards on hand just in case. This 4 GB card is a nice performer. If you have a high capacity camera (10 Megapixels or more) and are storing videos or RAW images, the extra cash for the 8GB card is worth it. Or you may want to step up to the larger 16 GB size that is now available.

    Enjoy!

    4-0 out of 5 stars Transcend 32 GB SDHC Review, May 25, 2009
    Before you drop 120~$ for a SD card ask yourself, Do you really need 32GB card? because the card itself with same specs costs only 35$ for the 16GB version, anyway here is info that might help you

    Pros :
    1- Class 6 Card the(guaranteed minimum Read/write speed of 6MB/s)
    2- My Test Results 18.2-18.5MB/S Read - 11.6-11.8 Write (very stable)
    3- Faster than average cards and almost close to top speed SDHC cards
    4- 32GB in a single small chip is awesome(You can use it as a portable HD once in a while, i share some stuff with my friends with it sometimes


    Cons :
    1- Expensive
    2- You can get two 16GB cards for around only 70$ and save yourself 50$~
    3- Slow write speeds for a 32GB card (Takes forever to fill it with DATA from PC, its not the card fault though , its just the SDHC technology is getting old and slow for 2009 standards , time for newer Tech)

    * Important Info

    Avoid the Sandisk Ultra Series they never reach the true marketed speed "15MB-20MB/S" its just in theory speed like how everybody knows that USB2 is much slower than its specs, and they are only Class 2 for the 32GB version which will drop frames from your HD video (Plus Class 4 is minimum requirement for shooting in HD ) if you plan to get San disk Card then get the Extreme III Series (but again from my own Tests there read speed is about 20MB not 30MB and the write speed is 14MB/s~ instead of the transcend 11MB/s write speed (Unless you spam shooting pictures with your DSLR you don't "need" faster speed)

    I bought This card because i plan to take videos with my HD camcorder that last more 2 Hours, if you do not plan to shoot for longtime then you are better with getting the 16GB card HOWEVER, if you are lazy like my mom and do not plan to transfer DATA from the card to Your computer HD after every trip, then get the 32GB card.or you gonna end up on a trip and a message pops "No memory"

    If you plan to shoot for longer time, check your camcorder battery too does it even last that long? so be sure about that before you drop over 100$ for this card

    1-0 out of 5 stars product failed., July 26, 2009
    Well, it was great while it lasted. Unfortunately, it did not last long.

    Like other reviewers, after <20 use cycles the device failed and I got a "lock" error when, in fact, the write-protection lock was not engaged. Oddly, by engaging the lock (i.e. entering read-only mode) I was able to remove the picture files from the card. Obviously, further use in the camera was impossible; I was also unable to reformat the card (either with my camera or with the SD Associations free software [..]).

    This card has a high average rating but I would urge customers to consider the number of 1-star ratings due to complete product failure before they purchase this item.



    5-0 out of 5 stars My Canon loves the 8 GB SDHC card, January 15, 2008
    I recently purchased a Canon Powershot A720IS digital camera that is capable of recognizing and using up to 2 TERRABYTES of memory card (in the future) so I wanted to get the largest memory card I could install for now. I wanted to use the camera both on dry land and with an underwater housing for shooting stills and video on dive trips. Camera specs said an 8 GB SDHC card would record one hour of hi res video at 30 fps. Or nearly 2300 hi res stills at 8 megapixels.

    A test of the Transcend 8GB SDHC card in the camera ended up shooting 70 minutes of full screen, 30fps digital video that could not be distinguished from my DV camcorder video quality. Playback from the memory card to the TV was so fast & efficient there was never a single "stutter" on the screen. The card speed is genuinely FAST as advertised. Low level formatting of the card allowed for very acceptable rapid-fire sequential still photo shooting speeds when light levels were bright enough that the flash was not needed/used. Something like 2 photos every 3 seconds. Files were flawless in display, both for stills and video.

    This product was significantly lower in price than the Kingston 8GB SDHC card I originally bought with the camera. I've used both interchangeably and cannot see any different in the speed or capacity and quality of imagery is identical. For the money I'll stick with Transcend and am looking forward to getting their 16GB card once the price drops substantially below the $100 mark. That would provide nearly 2 1/2 hours of video on my still camera or 4600 highest quality stills. I'm afraid my camcorder will be collecting dust much of the time. A big advantage to video on the card is there are NO MOVING PARTS, e.g. a mini DV tape cassette and camcorder or VCR playback unit needed to dump the video and stills to my Mac for editing and burning DVDs. I just stick the card in the MicroMate USB card reader, plug it in the computer and bingo, ready to sort thru and dump to the hard drive. Since the card is formatted by a Canon camera it automatically boots up the Canon Viewer software too. That should work the same for other brands of still cameras formatting this chip.

    3-0 out of 5 stars The Fastest Card at This Price But..., June 26, 2007
    This SDHC card is the fastest one in its price range but it may cause your images to be lost.

    I use two of this in a Canon SD750. After the first use, all of the images were lost. (But thank God, I could rescue them with Lexar Image Rescue 2, a program better than its competitors) Then I formated the card(s) in the camera(s) with "low level format" option several times and there has been no problem after that so far.

    I can suggest these points to potential owners of this card:
    1- Use it very carefully, make backups if possible.
    2- Format it several times before the first use with "low level format" option.
    3- If you loose your images, don't panic. At this situation, It is very important not to take anymore pictures. If you take pictures after this point, you can overwrite your lost images and there can be no chance to get them back. Connect your card to your computer with a card reader (SDHC Compatible) and rescue them with Lexar Image Rescue.

    5-0 out of 5 stars Excellent Mini Hard Drive equivalent, December 11, 2007
    This card is able to hold a complete DVD movie, thousands of songs/photos, or just serve as a backup device for one's files.

    It operates very well - I now have purchased 3 and with each use its value becomes more apparent.

    One word of caution - even though most laptops and systems have an SD card slot, older computers may not be able to recognize or write to this card. Make sure your system has the ability to read SDHC configured products.

    If you do not have an SD slot you can purchase an tiny SD reader (very inexpensive) that plugs into your USB port.

    4-0 out of 5 stars Great value, just be careful..., January 2, 2009
    I recently ordered this card as an accessory for my Acer Aspire One netbook PC. The card took a little while to ship, about 8 days, but that wasn't a big deal. The card has lots of space, and the read speeds are quite impressive. I mostly use it to run and store portable software, and it does a very good job at that.

    My only complaint is that when I first inserted the card into my PC it attempted to install some adware. The program was from a company called RelevantKnowledge, and they gather your information for market research purposes. Luckily my spyware software picked it up immediately,so I was able to delete it. Afterward I formatted the card, and now I'm happy as can be.

    5-0 out of 5 stars Reliable card, good speeds!, December 4, 2008
    Transcend 16 GB SDHC SD Class 6 Flash Memory Card TS16GSDHC6E [Amazon Frustration-Free Packaging]
    I have 4 of these cards that I use in my Panasonic HMC-150, a professional grade video camera. I've run read/write tests on all of them and they get about 14 MB/s write speeds and 17.5 MB/s read speeds. Never encountered any errors! These cards are the best bang for your buck, and the frustration free packaging is awesome.

    1-0 out of 5 stars Don't Let This Happen to You....., August 3, 2008
    It's great to have 8GB of memory but it is a double edged sword. Today after using this card for only the second time, it failed on me. I lost almost 200 precious images - gone forever. I am what you would call an enthusiast or hobbyist. I love photography and spend every spare minute, which is very seldom these days, pursuing my passion. So I do a fair amount of experimentation. These cards are great when they work - but if they fail you even once - the results can be catastrophic. Maybe I am the unlucky 1 of 250 reviewers with a bad experience with this product, but I feel it is my responsibility to report this to everyone. I hope it never happens to you. It is human nature for me to wonder, if I had spent a few more dollars for a better brand name, would my photos be intact today? Read more


    2. Transcend 16 GB Class 10 SDHC Flash Memory Card TS16GSDHC10E
    Electronics
    -- our price: $26.99
    (price subject to change: see help)
    Asin: B003VNKNEQ
    Manufacturer: TRANSCEND
    US | Canada | United Kingdom | Germany | France | Japan

    Editorial Review

    Amazon.com Product DescriptionTranscend 16GB Class 10 SDHC Flash Memory Card (TS16GSDHC10E) - Frustration Free Package

    Certified Frustration-Free Packaging
    Amazon.com has certified this product's packaging is Frustration-Free. A Frustration-Free Package is easy-to-open and comes without excess packaging materials such as hard plastic "clamshell" casings, plastic bindings, and wire ties. It is exactly the same as a traditionally packaged product--we've just streamlined the packaging to be opened without the use of a box cutter or knife and will protect your product just as well as traditional packaging during shipping. Products with Frustration-Free Packaging can frequently be shipped in their own boxes, without the need for an additional shipping box. Learn more.
    1 ... Read more

    Reviews

    4-0 out of 5 stars Not All Class 10 Cards are Equal
    UPDATE 9-10 I own 4 of these cards now. I have more of these than any other card I own because the are a very good value for capacity/price/and speed. My initial dissapointment over the lack of super high speed is outweighed by the reality that this card is an exceptional value.

    Origional Review:
    I purchased this card making the assumption that all class 10 cards had the same read and write speed. This was a poor assumption on my part.

    The product photo on Amazon does not have the card's speed printed on it. The card that was shipped shows the front of the card printed with "20MB/s" which is the cards read speed. The cards write speed is only 16MB/s.

    I own a SanDisk Extreme III class 10 card that has (up to) 30MB/s read and write speed. My Nikon D-90 that can take advantage of the SanDisk cards speed. The difference is the SanDisk card can capture 100 photos at fine resolution in 24 seconds. The Transcend card captures 66 photos in the same time/resolution.

    I reality very few people will ever have the need to drill off 100 photos in 24 seconds, but I can't stand to loose a good shot because the camera is slow while writing to the card and I can't fire the shutter. You can hear this happen at about 4.5 seconds in the video review. This does not happen with the SanDisk class 10 30MB/s card.

    A lot can happen in a fraction of a second that can make a shot good or bad and the having ability to fire a lot of shots in rapid succession is important to me.

    If you own an SLR that is capable of rapid fire, high-resolution photography you may want to consider the SanDisk Extreme III 30 MB/s card.

    If you own a compact digital camera, this card will exceed the capabilities of all of them. For compact cameras the card isn't usually the slowest part of the data write process, it's the camera.

    This card is reasonably priced for a class 10 card. Just know what you are getting, what your needs may be, and what else is available. I own other Transcend cards and they have always worked properly without any issues.

    The video that I attached shows this card with the same 24 seconds that I gave the SanDisk Card.

    To see the SanDisk Extreme III 30MB/s video demo and review on Amazon go to:

    Sandisk SDSDX3-008G-E31 8GB Extreme III SD Card 30MB/s (RETAIL PACKAGE)

    5-0 out of 5 stars Fast!
    I purchased this for use with my new Canon T2i. I use it primarily for shooting full resolution 1080p video, although I shoot stills as well.

    The camera choked on the class 4 chip that I originally purchased, but with this one, it is amazing. I can shoot rapidfire 18 megapixel stills (I've tested it up to 30+ shots in a row), and there is no lag. I've never had an error when shooting hi-def video.

    Highly recommended! I'm buying another one.

    5-0 out of 5 stars Fast, fast, fast!
    I bought this card for my Canon T1i. The card I had been using before ordering this one was a Kingston Class 6 micro sd card and it worked well enough for the type of shooting I did. Class 6 was the card speed that Canon recommended when I bought my T1i (Class 10 cards were not yet available) and it seemed fast enough for the way I used my camera - isolated single photos taken at Medium (8 MP) or Large (15 MP) jpg settings and 1280 x 720 video. And while I ocassionally took continuous photos, I had never much exceeded 5-10 photos in a row and had never run into a problem with my Class 6 card.

    When I first saw the Class 10 cards I did some experiments with my camera. How many continuous Large photos could I take before the camera slowed down? It turned out to be about 30. And how many RAW photos could I take before the camera slowed down? It turned out to be about 9. SInce I did not generally take any photos in RAW and never needed more than about 10 continuous photos at Large, the Class 6 card seemed more than sufficient for my needs. But I wondered about the speed of the Class 10 cards enough that I finally bought one.

    It turns out that the Class 10 card is sufficiently fast that there does not seem to be a reasonable upper limit on single Large photos. I have taken 60 on continuous without an issue. And although I still cannot take more than 9 RAW photos on continuous with the Class 10 card, when I am finished taking those photos the camera no longer displays a Wait - writing pictures screen. The RAW photos get written from the built-in memory to the card so quickly that the camera does not need to display the Wait screen.

    So this card is fast! Given the way I take photos this purchase was unnecessary, but still I am glad I bought it. I know I will not run into a situation where speed is an issue with this card.

    5-0 out of 5 stars Transcend vs Sandisk of equal price
    OK. this card was around $47 for a class 10 16gb. The other card i bought was a Sandisk class 10 8gb for the around same price. I did a 10 sec stop watch test on both cards with my Rebel T1i on raw and the Sandisk was only faster by 1 shot in a 10 sec burst. to me it seems trivial to pay 47 bucks for a Sandisk 8gig when you can get 16 gigs for the same price. yes i know, the Sandisk is good for arctic and desert temperatures... but i live in western NY... not Antarctica or the Sahara. If your looking for a good card, with more gigs for your buck, the Transcend is well worth it.

    3-0 out of 5 stars Slower than slow on Pentax K-x
    I bought this for my pentax K-x but it would randomly corrupt images. Also, it was slower than my 3+ year old SandDisk Ultra 1GB card. I was told by the seller (Thememstore) that others with the k-x have had the same problems. So apparently it must have something to do with the class 10 part, because since I returned this card I bought a SandDisk Extreme III 4GB Class 6 and it works far better.

    Would I recommend this card? Yes, but only to someone who knows that class 10 will work in their camera. I don't fault the card as I think the problem is with the K-x.

    1-0 out of 5 stars DESTROYS DATA -- after working fine for just long enough to fool you!
    SUMMARY:


    DO NOT BUY THIS CARD UNLESS YOU WANT TO PLAY RUSSIAN ROULETTE WITH YOUR DATA. Card worked fine when I bought it, but malfunctioned within the first 400 photos -- malfunctioned so badly that some very technical tools were needed to recover anything at all, and some photos were still permanently lost. Recovering the data requires the attention of a serious data recovery expert or someone with substantial technical knowledge and lots of time.


    DETAILS:

    I made the mistake buying this card for my camera right before a long trip overseas. It worked fine on the first few dozen shots. I didn't see any improvement in speed over my trusty 1.5-year-old Transcend 8GB Class-6 card, but that was most likely because the camera itself (Canon EOS Rebel 1000D/XSi) could not write images any faster than that (full-size JPEG, continuous shutter mode, roughly did ~2.5-3 images/second on both cards, with no slowdown after the first few shots).

    200 shots or so into using this card, I get a sudden mysterious message from the camera when I try to take a new shot -- Card Format Invalid (never saw it in the previous 1.5 years on this camera with 3 other SDHC cards). I look around for a bit, and discover that turning the camera off, pulling the card out and putting it back in is enough to clear the error message, and the previous photos are still visible.

    I then make the mistake of assuming the problem is just that -- needing to "reboot" the camera when the card is acting stupid, and nothing else. Over the next 200 or so shots, this problem comes up every 50 shots or so. Then, after yet another "reboot", I notice that the camera's playback function is only showing the last 30 photos!!! Yet it shows that there's only 5.7G of space left on the camera -- the other 2G+ _should_ be taken up by the photos I've shot thus far, but the playback doesn't show them.

    And this happens in the middle of a trek through the Peruvian Andes, several days' walk/horse ride from the first village with electricity, let alone a computer (with lots of once-in-a-lifetime shots on the camera). I pull this card out immediately, plug in my backup card, and wait until coming back to civilization to take a look at the card. Sure enough, the card is severely corrupted -- the directory listing is showing a bunch of folders with weird-character names, and only the last ~30 photos are visible from the computer, too!


    RECOVERY SUGGESTIONS:

    Hopefully you'll read this before buying and will not buy this piece of junk card. If you had the misfortune of running into the same problem and losing your data, read on.

    I have now had time to examine what was left on the card, using tools that are not easily usable to people without substantial technical training. I've managed to recover over 90% of my photos, but this was NOT easy, and I suspect that even some shops specializing in data recovery from failed disks may not know how to get your data back -- this is NOT as simple as just undeleting a file!

    Non-technical instructions:

    1. As soon as you see the FIRST error involving the card format, turn off the camera, pull out the card, and copy all of your photos to a different device (computer/harddrive/whatnot). The earlier you stop using this card, the safer your photos will be.

    2. As soon as the first problem happens, move the little plastic slider on the side of the card to the "Lock" position -- this will prevent anything else from being written on the card, which lowers the risk of what's left of your photos being overwritten.

    3. If you see directories (aka folders) with weird names when you plug this card into a computer -- or see a huge number of photos missing when you look at them on the camera, take the card out IMMEDIATELY, and take the card to a data recovery shop or a technical expert willing to look at the card in depth. Give them a printout of the explanation below.


    Technical details:

    At least in my case, the filesystem was indeed somehow damaged, perhaps by the camera deciding to write over the location of the root directory somehow. I took a full disk image of the card, and operated on the disk image only (there were no read errors when making the image, FWIW). Somehow I was lucky enough to have the original _subdirectories_ \DCIM and \DCIM\100CANON survive on the card intact even though the root directory structure now pointed to a different, new, place on the filesystem as \DCIM.

    I found the location of the old 100CANON directory on the filesystem by searching for one of the filenames I knew would exist in the old directory, like IMG_7000, across the whole disk image.

    I then edited the filesystem (yea, with a hex editor!) to have the new \DCIM directory point to the old 100CANON subdirectory. See the Wikipedia article on FAT32 for a reasonably easy reference on how to find the 4 bytes that need to be edited, and how to calculate the correct updated value.

    Mounting the edited disk image (with Linux's 'mount -t loop'), the directory was intact, and all but about 5% of the photos were completely intact as well -- the remainder must have been overwritten after the directory structure got corrupted. Depending on how long it takes the user to notice a problem, of course, much more damage could easily happen to the original data.

    Here's one easy hack to see how much you can hope to recover, if you're recovering camera data. The same trick may be useful for locating the JPEGs if the original image-containing directory is no longer intact (good luck with recovery then! I thankfully didn't have to do this). Take any image produced by the same camera, look at its JFIF headers. My camera leaves the string "Canon EOS DIGITAL REBEL XS" in two places in every JPEG it creates, early on in the JFIF header. Search for that string across the whole filesystem. If there's, say, 500 hits, that means you can hope for [easy] recovery of at most 250 photos -- any photo that is missing the JFIF headers will be missing the first chunk of the file, and will make it very hard both to find _and_ to reconstruct the remaining data, if any, into a usable JPEG (I have not tried to do this, at least, and it seems very hard).

    4-0 out of 5 stars Transcend Vs. Sandisk on Panasonic LX5
    I will be writing this review for both SanDisk Extreme SDHC class 10 8gb and Transcend SDHC class 10 16gb.

    I bought SanDisk class 10 and Transcend class 10 for my new Panasonic LX5. I got both card because no one really did a comparison with a compact camera and I was just going crazy trying to see if there is any big difference between the 2 cards.

    SanDisk Extreme package box indicated it's water proof, x-ray proof, shock proof, temperature proof. I am not ready to spend $50 to see if it really stand up to it's words. And I don't think normal people would go through the extreme condition in taking pictures or videos.

    Cut the story short, I really want to see if there is any difference in writing performance between the 2 cards in a compact camera. There is a continuous burst mode in LX5 and the manual indicated it is only limited by the condition of picture environment and performance of the SD card. Within the mode there are 2 different settings:1) speed priority or 2) picture/quality priority. The shutter speed is much faster with speed priority compare to picture priority.

    I first formatted both cards out of box then put each card in series of test(3 rounds each setting for each card) shooting at the same object under same lighting condition. The results:
    Speed Priority:
    SanDisk Class 10 8gb
    22-33 shots before camera stopped to allow the card to catch up with writing.

    Transcend Class 10 16gb
    22-24 shots before camera stopped to allow the card to catch up with writing.

    Picture priority
    SanDisk Class 10 8gb
    34-46 shots before camera stopped

    Transcend Class 10 16gb
    27-33 shots before camera stopped


    It seems that at a higher shutter speed, both cards performed very similar under the same shooting condition. But at a slower shutter speed the SanDisk definitely out perform Transcend. I hope this little experiment satisfied anyone with curiosity like me. Transcend definitely is a bargain with 16gb and almost half of the price compare to SanDisk. But I am going to use SanDisk Extreme as my primary card and Transcend as backup or on a second camera to ensure i would not miss any shots.

    5-0 out of 5 stars Depend on what you will use it for ...
    The "C10" is for "minimum sustaining speed" of 10mbps. The sustaining speed is critical if you're using for HD camcorder. There is other brand card that is also c10 but it costs more (2x) for its print of 30mbps on the card. It leads consumers into thinking that the higher price is worth for the 30mbps. However, the 30mbps is the "burst" speed. Burst speed is critical for HD camera and for doing copies. I have a HD camcorder and I'm very satisfied with this card after many hours for recording. I bought this card to do 100% of recording so it is the right price. I would buy the other high price brand card of 30mbps if I will do a lot of picture taking. The bottom line is to buy for the purpose of your usage.

    2-0 out of 5 stars Not very fast
    On my Panasonic GF1, it's the same speed as a Class 6 Transcend card and much slower than a Class 10 SanDisk Extreme. Buy the Transcend Class 6 if you want to save money or the SanDisk if you wan speed, but skip this one.

    2-0 out of 5 stars Class 10 pricing for Class 6 performance
    Ran some of my own informal tests of this card pitted against an older well used Transcend Class 6 card. The older cheaper card equalled or beat this "Class 10" card. Shop for the best priced Class 6 card right now or pay the premium for real Class 10 performance.

    Test Spec: ThinkPad T61p multi-format internal card reader, Windows 7 x64
    Both FAT32 formatted, both Taiwan mfg, sustained speed as reported by Windows.
    No multi-tasking during test.

    Material: Directory of 697 MB, Mix of Jpegs (~4.4mb/ea) & Nikon RAWs (~8.5mb/ea)
    Transcend 4GB SDHC Class 6
    Partition detail: 4K Offset/32K Blocks
    Averaged 17.5 MB/s read
    Averaged 7.3 MB/s write

    Transcend 4GB SDHC Class 10 (Formatted by Factory)
    Partition detail: 4K Offset/32K Blocks
    Averaged 14.5 MB/s read
    Averaged 3.7 MB/s write
    (Reformatted w/ Windows 7)
    Partition detail: 4K Offset/32K Blocks
    Averaged 14.5 MB/s read
    Averaged 3.7 MB/s write

    Material: 2.9GB DVD ISO File
    Transcend 4GB SDHC Class 10
    Partition detail: 4K Offset/32K Blocks
    Averaged 14.8 MB/s read
    Averaged 7.1 MB/s write

    Transcend 4GB SDHC Class 6
    Partition detail: 4K Offset/32K Blocks
    Averaged 12.3 MB/s read
    Averaged 8.2 MB/s write

    Other Card tested:
    Transcend 4 GB Class 6 SDHC Flash Memory Card TS4GSDHC6E [Amazon Frustration-Free Packaging]

    4-0 out of 5 stars Not All Class 10 Cards are Equal
    UPDATE 9-10 I own 4 of these cards now. I have more of these than any other card I own because the are a very good value for capacity/price/and speed. My initial dissapointment over the lack of super high speed is outweighed by the reality that this card is an exceptional value.

    Origional Review:
    I purchased this card making the assumption that all class 10 cards had the same read and write speed. This was a poor assumption on my part.

    The product photo on Amazon does not have the card's speed printed on it. The card that was shipped shows the front of the card printed with "20MB/s" which is the cards read speed. The cards write speed is only 16MB/s.

    I own a SanDisk Extreme III class 10 card that has (up to) 30MB/s read and write speed. My Nikon D-90 that can take advantage of the SanDisk cards speed. The difference is the SanDisk card can capture 100 photos at fine resolution in 24 seconds. The Transcend card captures 66 photos in the same time/resolution.

    I reality very few people will ever have the need to drill off 100 photos in 24 seconds, but I can't stand to loose a good shot because the camera is slow while writing to the card and I can't fire the shutter. You can hear this happen at about 4.5 seconds in the video review. This does not happen with the SanDisk class 10 30MB/s card.

    A lot can happen in a fraction of a second that can make a shot good or bad and the having ability to fire a lot of shots in rapid succession is important to me.

    If you own an SLR that is capable of rapid fire, high-resolution photography you may want to consider the SanDisk Extreme III 30 MB/s card.

    If you own a compact digital camera, this card will exceed the capabilities of all of them. For compact cameras the card isn't usually the slowest part of the data write process, it's the camera.

    This card is reasonably priced for a class 10 card. Just know what you are getting, what your needs may be, and what else is available. I own other Transcend cards and they have always worked properly without any issues.

    The video that I attached shows this card with the same 24 seconds that I gave the SanDisk Card.

    To see the SanDisk Extreme III 30MB/s video demo and review on Amazon go to:

    Sandisk SDSDX3-008G-E31 8GB Extreme III SD Card 30MB/s (RETAIL PACKAGE)

    5-0 out of 5 stars Fast!
    I purchased this for use with my new Canon T2i. I use it primarily for shooting full resolution 1080p video, although I shoot stills as well.

    The camera choked on the class 4 chip that I originally purchased, but with this one, it is amazing. I can shoot rapidfire 18 megapixel stills (I've tested it up to 30+ shots in a row), and there is no lag. I've never had an error when shooting hi-def video.

    Highly recommended! I'm buying another one.

    5-0 out of 5 stars Fast, fast, fast!
    I bought this card for my Canon T1i. The card I had been using before ordering this one was a Kingston Class 6 micro sd card and it worked well enough for the type of shooting I did. Class 6 was the card speed that Canon recommended when I bought my T1i (Class 10 cards were not yet available) and it seemed fast enough for the way I used my camera - isolated single photos taken at Medium (8 MP) or Large (15 MP) jpg settings and 1280 x 720 video. And while I ocassionally took continuous photos, I had never much exceeded 5-10 photos in a row and had never run into a problem with my Class 6 card.

    When I first saw the Class 10 cards I did some experiments with my camera. How many continuous Large photos could I take before the camera slowed down? It turned out to be about 30. And how many RAW photos could I take before the camera slowed down? It turned out to be about 9. SInce I did not generally take any photos in RAW and never needed more than about 10 continuous photos at Large, the Class 6 card seemed more than sufficient for my needs. But I wondered about the speed of the Class 10 cards enough that I finally bought one.

    It turns out that the Class 10 card is sufficiently fast that there does not seem to be a reasonable upper limit on single Large photos. I have taken 60 on continuous without an issue. And although I still cannot take more than 9 RAW photos on continuous with the Class 10 card, when I am finished taking those photos the camera no longer displays a Wait - writing pictures screen. The RAW photos get written from the built-in memory to the card so quickly that the camera does not need to display the Wait screen.

    So this card is fast! Given the way I take photos this purchase was unnecessary, but still I am glad I bought it. I know I will not run into a situation where speed is an issue with this card.

    5-0 out of 5 stars Transcend vs Sandisk of equal price
    OK. this card was around $47 for a class 10 16gb. The other card i bought was a Sandisk class 10 8gb for the around same price. I did a 10 sec stop watch test on both cards with my Rebel T1i on raw and the Sandisk was only faster by 1 shot in a 10 sec burst. to me it seems trivial to pay 47 bucks for a Sandisk 8gig when you can get 16 gigs for the same price. yes i know, the Sandisk is good for arctic and desert temperatures... but i live in western NY... not Antarctica or the Sahara. If your looking for a good card, with more gigs for your buck, the Transcend is well worth it.

    3-0 out of 5 stars Slower than slow on Pentax K-x
    I bought this for my pentax K-x but it would randomly corrupt images. Also, it was slower than my 3+ year old SandDisk Ultra 1GB card. I was told by the seller (Thememstore) that others with the k-x have had the same problems. So apparently it must have something to do with the class 10 part, because since I returned this card I bought a SandDisk Extreme III 4GB Class 6 and it works far better.

    Would I recommend this card? Yes, but only to someone who knows that class 10 will work in their camera. I don't fault the card as I think the problem is with the K-x.

    1-0 out of 5 stars DESTROYS DATA -- after working fine for just long enough to fool you!
    SUMMARY:


    DO NOT BUY THIS CARD UNLESS YOU WANT TO PLAY RUSSIAN ROULETTE WITH YOUR DATA. Card worked fine when I bought it, but malfunctioned within the first 400 photos -- malfunctioned so badly that some very technical tools were needed to recover anything at all, and some photos were still permanently lost. Recovering the data requires the attention of a serious data recovery expert or someone with substantial technical knowledge and lots of time.


    DETAILS:

    I made the mistake buying this card for my camera right before a long trip overseas. It worked fine on the first few dozen shots. I didn't see any improvement in speed over my trusty 1.5-year-old Transcend 8GB Class-6 card, but that was most likely because the camera itself (Canon EOS Rebel 1000D/XSi) could not write images any faster than that (full-size JPEG, continuous shutter mode, roughly did ~2.5-3 images/second on both cards, with no slowdown after the first few shots).

    200 shots or so into using this card, I get a sudden mysterious message from the camera when I try to take a new shot -- Card Format Invalid (never saw it in the previous 1.5 years on this camera with 3 other SDHC cards). I look around for a bit, and discover that turning the camera off, pulling the card out and putting it back in is enough to clear the error message, and the previous photos are still visible.

    I then make the mistake of assuming the problem is just that -- needing to "reboot" the camera when the card is acting stupid, and nothing else. Over the next 200 or so shots, this problem comes up every 50 shots or so. Then, after yet another "reboot", I notice that the camera's playback function is only showing the last 30 photos!!! Yet it shows that there's only 5.7G of space left on the camera -- the other 2G+ _should_ be taken up by the photos I've shot thus far, but the playback doesn't show them.

    And this happens in the middle of a trek through the Peruvian Andes, several days' walk/horse ride from the first village with electricity, let alone a computer (with lots of once-in-a-lifetime shots on the camera). I pull this card out immediately, plug in my backup card, and wait until coming back to civilization to take a look at the card. Sure enough, the card is severely corrupted -- the directory listing is showing a bunch of folders with weird-character names, and only the last ~30 photos are visible from the computer, too!


    RECOVERY SUGGESTIONS:

    Hopefully you'll read this before buying and will not buy this piece of junk card. If you had the misfortune of running into the same problem and losing your data, read on.

    I have now had time to examine what was left on the card, using tools that are not easily usable to people without substantial technical training. I've managed to recover over 90% of my photos, but this was NOT easy, and I suspect that even some shops specializing in data recovery from failed disks may not know how to get your data back -- this is NOT as simple as just undeleting a file!

    Non-technical instructions:

    1. As soon as you see the FIRST error involving the card format, turn off the camera, pull out the card, and copy all of your photos to a different device (computer/harddrive/whatnot). The earlier you stop using this card, the safer your photos will be.

    2. As soon as the first problem happens, move the little plastic slider on the side of the card to the "Lock" position -- this will prevent anything else from being written on the card, which lowers the risk of what's left of your photos being overwritten.

    3. If you see directories (aka folders) with weird names when you plug this card into a computer -- or see a huge number of photos missing when you look at them on the camera, take the card out IMMEDIATELY, and take the card to a data recovery shop or a technical expert willing to look at the card in depth. Give them a printout of the explanation below.


    Technical details:

    At least in my case, the filesystem was indeed somehow damaged, perhaps by the camera deciding to write over the location of the root directory somehow. I took a full disk image of the card, and operated on the disk image only (there were no read errors when making the image, FWIW). Somehow I was lucky enough to have the original _subdirectories_ \DCIM and \DCIM\100CANON survive on the card intact even though the root directory structure now pointed to a different, new, place on the filesystem as \DCIM.

    I found the location of the old 100CANON directory on the filesystem by searching for one of the filenames I knew would exist in the old directory, like IMG_7000, across the whole disk image.

    I then edited the filesystem (yea, with a hex editor!) to have the new \DCIM directory point to the old 100CANON subdirectory. See the Wikipedia article on FAT32 for a reasonably easy reference on how to find the 4 bytes that need to be edited, and how to calculate the correct updated value.

    Mounting the edited disk image (with Linux's 'mount -t loop'), the directory was intact, and all but about 5% of the photos were completely intact as well -- the remainder must have been overwritten after the directory structure got corrupted. Depending on how long it takes the user to notice a problem, of course, much more damage could easily happen to the original data.

    Here's one easy hack to see how much you can hope to recover, if you're recovering camera data. The same trick may be useful for locating the JPEGs if the original image-containing directory is no longer intact (good luck with recovery then! I thankfully didn't have to do this). Take any image produced by the same camera, look at its JFIF headers. My camera leaves the string "Canon EOS DIGITAL REBEL XS" in two places in every JPEG it creates, early on in the JFIF header. Search for that string across the whole filesystem. If there's, say, 500 hits, that means you can hope for [easy] recovery of at most 250 photos -- any photo that is missing the JFIF headers will be missing the first chunk of the file, and will make it very hard both to find _and_ to reconstruct the remaining data, if any, into a usable JPEG (I have not tried to do this, at least, and it seems very hard).

    4-0 out of 5 stars Transcend Vs. Sandisk on Panasonic LX5
    I will be writing this review for both SanDisk Extreme SDHC class 10 8gb and Transcend SDHC class 10 16gb.

    I bought SanDisk class 10 and Transcend class 10 for my new Panasonic LX5. I got both card because no one really did a comparison with a compact camera and I was just going crazy trying to see if there is any big difference between the 2 cards.

    SanDisk Extreme package box indicated it's water proof, x-ray proof, shock proof, temperature proof. I am not ready to spend $50 to see if it really stand up to it's words. And I don't think normal people would go through the extreme condition in taking pictures or videos.

    Cut the story short, I really want to see if there is any difference in writing performance between the 2 cards in a compact camera. There is a continuous burst mode in LX5 and the manual indicated it is only limited by the condition of picture environment and performance of the SD card. Within the mode there are 2 different settings:1) speed priority or 2) picture/quality priority. The shutter speed is much faster with speed priority compare to picture priority.

    I first formatted both cards out of box then put each card in series of test(3 rounds each setting for each card) shooting at the same object under same lighting condition. The results:
    Speed Priority:
    SanDisk Class 10 8gb
    22-33 shots before camera stopped to allow the card to catch up with writing.

    Transcend Class 10 16gb
    22-24 shots before camera stopped to allow the card to catch up with writing.

    Picture priority
    SanDisk Class 10 8gb
    34-46 shots before camera stopped

    Transcend Class 10 16gb
    27-33 shots before camera stopped


    It seems that at a higher shutter speed, both cards performed very similar under the same shooting condition. But at a slower shutter speed the SanDisk definitely out perform Transcend. I hope this little experiment satisfied anyone with curiosity like me. Transcend definitely is a bargain with 16gb and almost half of the price compare to SanDisk. But I am going to use SanDisk Extreme as my primary card and Transcend as backup or on a second camera to ensure i would not miss any shots.

    5-0 out of 5 stars Depend on what you will use it for ...
    The "C10" is for "minimum sustaining speed" of 10mbps. The sustaining speed is critical if you're using for HD camcorder. There is other brand card that is also c10 but it costs more (2x) for its print of 30mbps on the card. It leads consumers into thinking that the higher price is worth for the 30mbps. However, the 30mbps is the "burst" speed. Burst speed is critical for HD camera and for doing copies. I have a HD camcorder and I'm very satisfied with this card after many hours for recording. I bought this card to do 100% of recording so it is the right price. I would buy the other high price brand card of 30mbps if I will do a lot of picture taking. The bottom line is to buy for the purpose of your usage.

    2-0 out of 5 stars Not very fast
    On my Panasonic GF1, it's the same speed as a Class 6 Transcend card and much slower than a Class 10 SanDisk Extreme. Buy the Transcend Class 6 if you want to save money or the SanDisk if you wan speed, but skip this one.

    2-0 out of 5 stars Class 10 pricing for Class 6 performance
    Ran some of my own informal tests of this card pitted against an older well used Transcend Class 6 card. The older cheaper card equalled or beat this "Class 10" card. Shop for the best priced Class 6 card right now or pay the premium for real Class 10 performance.

    Test Spec: ThinkPad T61p multi-format internal card reader, Windows 7 x64
    Both FAT32 formatted, both Taiwan mfg, sustained speed as reported by Windows.
    No multi-tasking during test.

    Material: Directory of 697 MB, Mix of Jpegs (~4.4mb/ea) & Nikon RAWs (~8.5mb/ea)
    Transcend 4GB SDHC Class 6
    Partition detail: 4K Offset/32K Blocks
    Averaged 17.5 MB/s read
    Averaged 7.3 MB/s write

    Transcend 4GB SDHC Class 10 (Formatted by Factory)
    Partition detail: 4K Offset/32K Blocks
    Averaged 14.5 MB/s read
    Averaged 3.7 MB/s write
    (Reformatted w/ Windows 7)
    Partition detail: 4K Offset/32K Blocks
    Averaged 14.5 MB/s read
    Averaged 3.7 MB/s write

    Material: 2.9GB DVD ISO File
    Transcend 4GB SDHC Class 10
    Partition detail: 4K Offset/32K Blocks
    Averaged 14.8 MB/s read
    Averaged 7.1 MB/s write

    Transcend 4GB SDHC Class 6
    Partition detail: 4K Offset/32K Blocks
    Averaged 12.3 MB/s read
    Averaged 8.2 MB/s write

    Other Card tested:
    Transcend 4 GB Class 6 SDHC Flash Memory Card TS4GSDHC6E [Amazon Frustration-Free Packaging] Read more


    3. Transcend 16GB Class 10 SDHC Card (TS16GSDHC10)
    Electronics
    list price: $49.99 -- our price: $26.99
    (price subject to change: see help)
    Asin: B002WE4HE2
    Manufacturer: TRANSCEND
    Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars
    US | Canada | United Kingdom | Germany | France | Japan

    Editorial Review

    Transcend 16gb SDHC card SD 3.0 SPD class 10 ... Read more

    Reviews

    4-0 out of 5 stars Not All Class 10 Cards are Equal, April 11, 2010
    UPDATE 9-10 I own 4 of these cards now. I have more of these than any other card I own because the are a very good value for capacity/price/and speed. My initial dissapointment over the lack of super high speed is outweighed by the reality that this card is an exceptional value.

    Origional Review:
    I purchased this card making the assumption that all class 10 cards had the same read and write speed. This was a poor assumption on my part.

    The product photo on Amazon does not have the card's speed printed on it. The card that was shipped shows the front of the card printed with "20MB/s" which is the cards read speed. The cards write speed is only 16MB/s.

    I own a SanDisk Extreme III class 10 card that has (up to) 30MB/s read and write speed. My Nikon D-90 that can take advantage of the SanDisk cards speed. The difference is the SanDisk card can capture 100 photos at fine resolution in 24 seconds. The Transcend card captures 66 photos in the same time/resolution.

    I reality very few people will ever have the need to drill off 100 photos in 24 seconds, but I can't stand to loose a good shot because the camera is slow while writing to the card and I can't fire the shutter. You can hear this happen at about 4.5 seconds in the video review. This does not happen with the SanDisk class 10 30MB/s card.

    A lot can happen in a fraction of a second that can make a shot good or bad and the having ability to fire a lot of shots in rapid succession is important to me.

    If you own an SLR that is capable of rapid fire, high-resolution photography you may want to consider the SanDisk Extreme III 30 MB/s card.

    If you own a compact digital camera, this card will exceed the capabilities of all of them. For compact cameras the card isn't usually the slowest part of the data write process, it's the camera.

    This card is reasonably priced for a class 10 card. Just know what you are getting, what your needs may be, and what else is available. I own other Transcend cards and they have always worked properly without any issues.

    The video that I attached shows this card with the same 24 seconds that I gave the SanDisk Card.

    To see the SanDisk Extreme III 30MB/s video demo and review on Amazon go to:

    Sandisk SDSDX3-008G-E31 8GB Extreme III SD Card 30MB/s (RETAIL PACKAGE)

    5-0 out of 5 stars Fast!, April 8, 2010
    I bought this for my pentax K-x but it would randomly corrupt images. Also, it was slower than my 3+ year old SandDisk Ultra 1GB card. I was told by the seller (Thememstore) that others with the k-x have had the same problems. So apparently it must have something to do with the class 10 part, because since I returned this card I bought a SandDisk Extreme III 4GB Class 6 and it works far better.

    Would I recommend this card? Yes, but only to someone who knows that class 10 will work in their camera. I don't fault the card as I think the problem is with the K-x.

    1-0 out of 5 stars DESTROYS DATA -- after working fine for just long enough to fool you!, November 6, 2010
    SUMMARY:


    DO NOT BUY THIS CARD UNLESS YOU WANT TO PLAY RUSSIAN ROULETTE WITH YOUR DATA. Card worked fine when I bought it, but malfunctioned within the first 400 photos -- malfunctioned so badly that some very technical tools were needed to recover anything at all, and some photos were still permanently lost. Recovering the data requires the attention of a serious data recovery expert or someone with substantial technical knowledge and lots of time.


    DETAILS:

    I made the mistake buying this card for my camera right before a long trip overseas. It worked fine on the first few dozen shots. I didn't see any improvement in speed over my trusty 1.5-year-old Transcend 8GB Class-6 card, but that was most likely because the camera itself (Canon EOS Rebel 1000D/XSi) could not write images any faster than that (full-size JPEG, continuous shutter mode, roughly did ~2.5-3 images/second on both cards, with no slowdown after the first few shots).

    200 shots or so into using this card, I get a sudden mysterious message from the camera when I try to take a new shot -- Card Format Invalid (never saw it in the previous 1.5 years on this camera with 3 other SDHC cards). I look around for a bit, and discover that turning the camera off, pulling the card out and putting it back in is enough to clear the error message, and the previous photos are still visible.

    I then make the mistake of assuming the problem is just that -- needing to "reboot" the camera when the card is acting stupid, and nothing else. Over the next 200 or so shots, this problem comes up every 50 shots or so. Then, after yet another "reboot", I notice that the camera's playback function is only showing the last 30 photos!!! Yet it shows that there's only 5.7G of space left on the camera -- the other 2G+ _should_ be taken up by the photos I've shot thus far, but the playback doesn't show them.

    And this happens in the middle of a trek through the Peruvian Andes, several days' walk/horse ride from the first village with electricity, let alone a computer (with lots of once-in-a-lifetime shots on the camera). I pull this card out immediately, plug in my backup card, and wait until coming back to civilization to take a look at the card. Sure enough, the card is severely corrupted -- the directory listing is showing a bunch of folders with weird-character names, and only the last ~30 photos are visible from the computer, too!


    RECOVERY SUGGESTIONS:

    Hopefully you'll read this before buying and will not buy this piece of junk card. If you had the misfortune of running into the same problem and losing your data, read on.

    I have now had time to examine what was left on the card, using tools that are not easily usable to people without substantial technical training. I've managed to recover over 90% of my photos, but this was NOT easy, and I suspect that even some shops specializing in data recovery from failed disks may not know how to get your data back -- this is NOT as simple as just undeleting a file!

    Non-technical instructions:

    1. As soon as you see the FIRST error involving the card format, turn off the camera, pull out the card, and copy all of your photos to a different device (computer/harddrive/whatnot). The earlier you stop using this card, the safer your photos will be.

    2. As soon as the first problem happens, move the little plastic slider on the side of the card to the "Lock" position -- this will prevent anything else from being written on the card, which lowers the risk of what's left of your photos being overwritten.

    3. If you see directories (aka folders) with weird names when you plug this card into a computer -- or see a huge number of photos missing when you look at them on the camera, take the card out IMMEDIATELY, and take the card to a data recovery shop or a technical expert willing to look at the card in depth. Give them a printout of the explanation below.


    Technical details:

    At least in my case, the filesystem was indeed somehow damaged, perhaps by the camera deciding to write over the location of the root directory somehow. I took a full disk image of the card, and operated on the disk image only (there were no read errors when making the image, FWIW). Somehow I was lucky enough to have the original _subdirectories_ \DCIM and \DCIM\100CANON survive on the card intact even though the root directory structure now pointed to a different, new, place on the filesystem as \DCIM.

    I found the location of the old 100CANON directory on the filesystem by searching for one of the filenames I knew would exist in the old directory, like IMG_7000, across the whole disk image.

    I then edited the filesystem (yea, with a hex editor!) to have the new \DCIM directory point to the old 100CANON subdirectory. See the Wikipedia article on FAT32 for a reasonably easy reference on how to find the 4 bytes that need to be edited, and how to calculate the correct updated value.

    Mounting the edited disk image (with Linux's 'mount -t loop'), the directory was intact, and all but about 5% of the photos were completely intact as well -- the remainder must have been overwritten after the directory structure got corrupted. Depending on how long it takes the user to notice a problem, of course, much more damage could easily happen to the original data.

    Here's one easy hack to see how much you can hope to recover, if you're recovering camera data. The same trick may be useful for locating the JPEGs if the original image-containing directory is no longer intact (good luck with recovery then! I thankfully didn't have to do this). Take any image produced by the same camera, look at its JFIF headers. My camera leaves the string "Canon EOS DIGITAL REBEL XS" in two places in every JPEG it creates, early on in the JFIF header. Search for that string across the whole filesystem. If there's, say, 500 hits, that means you can hope for [easy] recovery of at most 250 photos -- any photo that is missing the JFIF headers will be missing the first chunk of the file, and will make it very hard both to find _and_ to reconstruct the remaining data, if any, into a usable JPEG (I have not tried to do this, at least, and it seems very hard).

    4-0 out of 5 stars Transcend Vs. Sandisk on Panasonic LX5, November 12, 2010
    The "C10" is for "minimum sustaining speed" of 10mbps. The sustaining speed is critical if you're using for HD camcorder. There is other brand card that is also c10 but it costs more (2x) for its print of 30mbps on the card. It leads consumers into thinking that the higher price is worth for the 30mbps. However, the 30mbps is the "burst" speed. Burst speed is critical for HD camera and for doing copies. I have a HD camcorder and I'm very satisfied with this card after many hours for recording. I bought this card to do 100% of recording so it is the right price. I would buy the other high price brand card of 30mbps if I will do a lot of picture taking. The bottom line is to buy for the purpose of your usage.

    2-0 out of 5 stars Not very fast, April 14, 2010
    Ran some of my own informal tests of this card pitted against an older well used Transcend Class 6 card. The older cheaper card equalled or beat this "Class 10" card. Shop for the best priced Class 6 card right now or pay the premium for real Class 10 performance.

    Test Spec: ThinkPad T61p multi-format internal card reader, Windows 7 x64
    Both FAT32 formatted, both Taiwan mfg, sustained speed as reported by Windows.
    No multi-tasking during test.

    Material: Directory of 697 MB, Mix of Jpegs (~4.4mb/ea) & Nikon RAWs (~8.5mb/ea)
    Transcend 4GB SDHC Class 6
    Partition detail: 4K Offset/32K Blocks
    Averaged 17.5 MB/s read
    Averaged 7.3 MB/s write

    Transcend 4GB SDHC Class 10 (Formatted by Factory)
    Partition detail: 4K Offset/32K Blocks
    Averaged 14.5 MB/s read
    Averaged 3.7 MB/s write
    (Reformatted w/ Windows 7)
    Partition detail: 4K Offset/32K Blocks
    Averaged 14.5 MB/s read
    Averaged 3.7 MB/s write

    Material: 2.9GB DVD ISO File
    Transcend 4GB SDHC Class 10
    Partition detail: 4K Offset/32K Blocks
    Averaged 14.8 MB/s read
    Averaged 7.1 MB/s write

    Transcend 4GB SDHC Class 6
    Partition detail: 4K Offset/32K Blocks
    Averaged 12.3 MB/s read
    Averaged 8.2 MB/s write

    Other Card tested:
    Transcend 4 GB Class 6 SDHC Flash Memory Card TS4GSDHC6E [Amazon Frustration-Free Packaging]

    4-0 out of 5 stars Not All Class 10 Cards are Equal, April 11, 2010
    UPDATE 9-10 I own 4 of these cards now. I have more of these than any other card I own because the are a very good value for capacity/price/and speed. My initial dissapointment over the lack of super high speed is outweighed by the reality that this card is an exceptional value.

    Origional Review:
    I purchased this card making the assumption that all class 10 cards had the same read and write speed. This was a poor assumption on my part.

    The product photo on Amazon does not have the card's speed printed on it. The card that was shipped shows the front of the card printed with "20MB/s" which is the cards read speed. The cards write speed is only 16MB/s.

    I own a SanDisk Extreme III class 10 card that has (up to) 30MB/s read and write speed. My Nikon D-90 that can take advantage of the SanDisk cards speed. The difference is the SanDisk card can capture 100 photos at fine resolution in 24 seconds. The Transcend card captures 66 photos in the same time/resolution.

    I reality very few people will ever have the need to drill off 100 photos in 24 seconds, but I can't stand to loose a good shot because the camera is slow while writing to the card and I can't fire the shutter. You can hear this happen at about 4.5 seconds in the video review. This does not happen with the SanDisk class 10 30MB/s card.

    A lot can happen in a fraction of a second that can make a shot good or bad and the having ability to fire a lot of shots in rapid succession is important to me.

    If you own an SLR that is capable of rapid fire, high-resolution photography you may want to consider the SanDisk Extreme III 30 MB/s card.

    If you own a compact digital camera, this card will exceed the capabilities of all of them. For compact cameras the card isn't usually the slowest part of the data write process, it's the camera.

    This card is reasonably priced for a class 10 card. Just know what you are getting, what your needs may be, and what else is available. I own other Transcend cards and they have always worked properly without any issues.

    The video that I attached shows this card with the same 24 seconds that I gave the SanDisk Card.

    To see the SanDisk Extreme III 30MB/s video demo and review on Amazon go to:

    Sandisk SDSDX3-008G-E31 8GB Extreme III SD Card 30MB/s (RETAIL PACKAGE)

    5-0 out of 5 stars Fast!, April 8, 2010
    I purchased this for use with my new Canon T2i. I use it primarily for shooting full resolution 1080p video, although I shoot stills as well.

    The camera choked on the class 4 chip that I originally purchased, but with this one, it is amazing. I can shoot rapidfire 18 megapixel stills (I've tested it up to 30+ shots in a row), and there is no lag. I've never had an error when shooting hi-def video.

    Highly recommended! I'm buying another one.

    5-0 out of 5 stars Fast, fast, fast!, March 15, 2010
    I bought this card for my Canon T1i. The card I had been using before ordering this one was a Kingston Class 6 micro sd card and it worked well enough for the type of shooting I did. Class 6 was the card speed that Canon recommended when I bought my T1i (Class 10 cards were not yet available) and it seemed fast enough for the way I used my camera - isolated single photos taken at Medium (8 MP) or Large (15 MP) jpg settings and 1280 x 720 video. And while I ocassionally took continuous photos, I had never much exceeded 5-10 photos in a row and had never run into a problem with my Class 6 card.

    When I first saw the Class 10 cards I did some experiments with my camera. How many continuous Large photos could I take before the camera slowed down? It turned out to be about 30. And how many RAW photos could I take before the camera slowed down? It turned out to be about 9. SInce I did not generally take any photos in RAW and never needed more than about 10 continuous photos at Large, the Class 6 card seemed more than sufficient for my needs. But I wondered about the speed of the Class 10 cards enough that I finally bought one.

    It turns out that the Class 10 card is sufficiently fast that there does not seem to be a reasonable upper limit on single Large photos. I have taken 60 on continuous without an issue. And although I still cannot take more than 9 RAW photos on continuous with the Class 10 card, when I am finished taking those photos the camera no longer displays a Wait - writing pictures screen. The RAW photos get written from the built-in memory to the card so quickly that the camera does not need to display the Wait screen.

    So this card is fast! Given the way I take photos this purchase was unnecessary, but still I am glad I bought it. I know I will not run into a situation where speed is an issue with this card.

    5-0 out of 5 stars Transcend vs Sandisk of equal price, July 31, 2010
    OK. this card was around $47 for a class 10 16gb. The other card i bought was a Sandisk class 10 8gb for the around same price. I did a 10 sec stop watch test on both cards with my Rebel T1i on raw and the Sandisk was only faster by 1 shot in a 10 sec burst. to me it seems trivial to pay 47 bucks for a Sandisk 8gig when you can get 16 gigs for the same price. yes i know, the Sandisk is good for arctic and desert temperatures... but i live in western NY... not Antarctica or the Sahara. If your looking for a good card, with more gigs for your buck, the Transcend is well worth it.

    3-0 out of 5 stars Slower than slow on Pentax K-x, April 25, 2010
    I bought this for my pentax K-x but it would randomly corrupt images. Also, it was slower than my 3+ year old SandDisk Ultra 1GB card. I was told by the seller (Thememstore) that others with the k-x have had the same problems. So apparently it must have something to do with the class 10 part, because since I returned this card I bought a SandDisk Extreme III 4GB Class 6 and it works far better.

    Would I recommend this card? Yes, but only to someone who knows that class 10 will work in their camera. I don't fault the card as I think the problem is with the K-x.

    1-0 out of 5 stars DESTROYS DATA -- after working fine for just long enough to fool you!, November 6, 2010
    SUMMARY:


    DO NOT BUY THIS CARD UNLESS YOU WANT TO PLAY RUSSIAN ROULETTE WITH YOUR DATA. Card worked fine when I bought it, but malfunctioned within the first 400 photos -- malfunctioned so badly that some very technical tools were needed to recover anything at all, and some photos were still permanently lost. Recovering the data requires the attention of a serious data recovery expert or someone with substantial technical knowledge and lots of time.


    DETAILS:

    I made the mistake buying this card for my camera right before a long trip overseas. It worked fine on the first few dozen shots. I didn't see any improvement in speed over my trusty 1.5-year-old Transcend 8GB Class-6 card, but that was most likely because the camera itself (Canon EOS Rebel 1000D/XSi) could not write images any faster than that (full-size JPEG, continuous shutter mode, roughly did ~2.5-3 images/second on both cards, with no slowdown after the first few shots).

    200 shots or so into using this card, I get a sudden mysterious message from the camera when I try to take a new shot -- Card Format Invalid (never saw it in the previous 1.5 years on this camera with 3 other SDHC cards). I look around for a bit, and discover that turning the camera off, pulling the card out and putting it back in is enough to clear the error message, and the previous photos are still visible.

    I then make the mistake of assuming the problem is just that -- needing to "reboot" the camera when the card is acting stupid, and nothing else. Over the next 200 or so shots, this problem comes up every 50 shots or so. Then, after yet another "reboot", I notice that the camera's playback function is only showing the last 30 photos!!! Yet it shows that there's only 5.7G of space left on the camera -- the other 2G+ _should_ be taken up by the photos I've shot thus far, but the playback doesn't show them.

    And this happens in the middle of a trek through the Peruvian Andes, several days' walk/horse ride from the first village with electricity, let alone a computer (with lots of once-in-a-lifetime shots on the camera). I pull this card out immediately, plug in my backup card, and wait until coming back to civilization to take a look at the card. Sure enough, the card is severely corrupted -- the directory listing is showing a bunch of folders with weird-character names, and only the last ~30 photos are visible from the computer, too!


    RECOVERY SUGGESTIONS:

    Hopefully you'll read this before buying and will not buy this piece of junk card. If you had the misfortune of running into the same problem and losing your data, read on.

    I have now had time to examine what was left on the card, using tools that are not easily usable to people without substantial technical training. I've managed to recover over 90% of my photos, but this was NOT easy, and I suspect that even some shops specializing in data recovery from failed disks may not know how to get your data back -- this is NOT as simple as just undeleting a file!

    Non-technical instructions:

    1. As soon as you see the FIRST error involving the card format, turn off the camera, pull out the card, and copy all of your photos to a different device (computer/harddrive/whatnot). The earlier you stop using this card, the safer your photos will be.

    2. As soon as the first problem happens, move the little plastic slider on the side of the card to the "Lock" position -- this will prevent anything else from being written on the card, which lowers the risk of what's left of your photos being overwritten.

    3. If you see directories (aka folders) with weird names when you plug this card into a computer -- or see a huge number of photos missing when you look at them on the camera, take the card out IMMEDIATELY, and take the card to a data recovery shop or a technical expert willing to look at the card in depth. Give them a printout of the explanation below.


    Technical details:

    At least in my case, the filesystem was indeed somehow damaged, perhaps by the camera deciding to write over the location of the root directory somehow. I took a full disk image of the card, and operated on the disk image only (there were no read errors when making the image, FWIW). Somehow I was lucky enough to have the original _subdirectories_ \DCIM and \DCIM\100CANON survive on the card intact even though the root directory structure now pointed to a different, new, place on the filesystem as \DCIM.

    I found the location of the old 100CANON directory on the filesystem by searching for one of the filenames I knew would exist in the old directory, like IMG_7000, across the whole disk image.

    I then edited the filesystem (yea, with a hex editor!) to have the new \DCIM directory point to the old 100CANON subdirectory. See the Wikipedia article on FAT32 for a reasonably easy reference on how to find the 4 bytes that need to be edited, and how to calculate the correct updated value.

    Mounting the edited disk image (with Linux's 'mount -t loop'), the directory was intact, and all but about 5% of the photos were completely intact as well -- the remainder must have been overwritten after the directory structure got corrupted. Depending on how long it takes the user to notice a problem, of course, much more damage could easily happen to the original data.

    Here's one easy hack to see how much you can hope to recover, if you're recovering camera data. The same trick may be useful for locating the JPEGs if the original image-containing directory is no longer intact (good luck with recovery then! I thankfully didn't have to do this). Take any image produced by the same camera, look at its JFIF headers. My camera leaves the string "Canon EOS DIGITAL REBEL XS" in two places in every JPEG it creates, early on in the JFIF header. Search for that string across the whole filesystem. If there's, say, 500 hits, that means you can hope for [easy] recovery of at most 250 photos -- any photo that is missing the JFIF headers will be missing the first chunk of the file, and will make it very hard both to find _and_ to reconstruct the remaining data, if any, into a usable JPEG (I have not tried to do this, at least, and it seems very hard).

    4-0 out of 5 stars Transcend Vs. Sandisk on Panasonic LX5, November 12, 2010
    I will be writing this review for both SanDisk Extreme SDHC class 10 8gb and Transcend SDHC class 10 16gb.

    I bought SanDisk class 10 and Transcend class 10 for my new Panasonic LX5. I got both card because no one really did a comparison with a compact camera and I was just going crazy trying to see if there is any big difference between the 2 cards.

    SanDisk Extreme package box indicated it's water proof, x-ray proof, shock proof, temperature proof. I am not ready to spend $50 to see if it really stand up to it's words. And I don't think normal people would go through the extreme condition in taking pictures or videos.

    Cut the story short, I really want to see if there is any difference in writing performance between the 2 cards in a compact camera. There is a continuous burst mode in LX5 and the manual indicated it is only limited by the condition of picture environment and performance of the SD card. Within the mode there are 2 different settings:1) speed priority or 2) picture/quality priority. The shutter speed is much faster with speed priority compare to picture priority.

    I first formatted both cards out of box then put each card in series of test(3 rounds each setting for each card) shooting at the same object under same lighting condition. The results:
    Speed Priority:
    SanDisk Class 10 8gb
    22-33 shots before camera stopped to allow the card to catch up with writing.

    Transcend Class 10 16gb
    22-24 shots before camera stopped to allow the card to catch up with writing.

    Picture priority
    SanDisk Class 10 8gb
    34-46 shots before camera stopped

    Transcend Class 10 16gb
    27-33 shots before camera stopped


    It seems that at a higher shutter speed, both cards performed very similar under the same shooting condition. But at a slower shutter speed the SanDisk definitely out perform Transcend. I hope this little experiment satisfied anyone with curiosity like me. Transcend definitely is a bargain with 16gb and almost half of the price compare to SanDisk. But I am going to use SanDisk Extreme as my primary card and Transcend as backup or on a second camera to ensure i would not miss any shots.

    5-0 out of 5 stars Depend on what you will use it for ..., October 13, 2010
    The "C10" is for "minimum sustaining speed" of 10mbps. The sustaining speed is critical if you're using for HD camcorder. There is other brand card that is also c10 but it costs more (2x) for its print of 30mbps on the card. It leads consumers into thinking that the higher price is worth for the 30mbps. However, the 30mbps is the "burst" speed. Burst speed is critical for HD camera and for doing copies. I have a HD camcorder and I'm very satisfied with this card after many hours for recording. I bought this card to do 100% of recording so it is the right price. I would buy the other high price brand card of 30mbps if I will do a lot of picture taking. The bottom line is to buy for the purpose of your usage.

    2-0 out of 5 stars Not very fast, April 14, 2010
    On my Panasonic GF1, it's the same speed as a Class 6 Transcend card and much slower than a Class 10 SanDisk Extreme. Buy the Transcend Class 6 if you want to save money or the SanDisk if you wan speed, but skip this one.

    2-0 out of 5 stars Class 10 pricing for Class 6 performance, June 10, 2010
    Ran some of my own informal tests of this card pitted against an older well used Transcend Class 6 card. The older cheaper card equalled or beat this "Class 10" card. Shop for the best priced Class 6 card right now or pay the premium for real Class 10 performance.

    Test Spec: ThinkPad T61p multi-format internal card reader, Windows 7 x64
    Both FAT32 formatted, both Taiwan mfg, sustained speed as reported by Windows.
    No multi-tasking during test.

    Material: Directory of 697 MB, Mix of Jpegs (~4.4mb/ea) & Nikon RAWs (~8.5mb/ea)
    Transcend 4GB SDHC Class 6
    Partition detail: 4K Offset/32K Blocks
    Averaged 17.5 MB/s read
    Averaged 7.3 MB/s write

    Transcend 4GB SDHC Class 10 (Formatted by Factory)
    Partition detail: 4K Offset/32K Blocks
    Averaged 14.5 MB/s read
    Averaged 3.7 MB/s write
    (Reformatted w/ Windows 7)
    Partition detail: 4K Offset/32K Blocks
    Averaged 14.5 MB/s read
    Averaged 3.7 MB/s write

    Material: 2.9GB DVD ISO File
    Transcend 4GB SDHC Class 10
    Partition detail: 4K Offset/32K Blocks
    Averaged 14.8 MB/s read
    Averaged 7.1 MB/s write

    Transcend 4GB SDHC Class 6
    Partition detail: 4K Offset/32K Blocks
    Averaged 12.3 MB/s read
    Averaged 8.2 MB/s write

    Other Card tested:
    Transcend 4 GB Class 6 SDHC Flash Memory Card TS4GSDHC6E [Amazon Frustration-Free Packaging] Read more


    4. Transcend 8 GB Class 6 SDHC Flash Memory Card TS8GSDHC6E
    Electronics
    -- our price: $13.60
    (price subject to change: see help)
    Asin: B001ECQVSS
    Manufacturer: TRANSCEND
    Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars
    US | Canada | United Kingdom | Germany | France | Japan

    Editorial Review

    Fully Compatible with SDA 2.0 specification. Suitable for SDHC compliant devices, MLC flash chip with High Speed transfer rate. Perfect for highend digital devices. Please make sure your device can support SDHC format before you purchase! SDHC host devices can use both SD and SDHC memory cards. ... Read more

    Reviews

    5-0 out of 5 stars Great affordable SDHC card, March 28, 2008
    In the past, I bought a Transcend 8GB SDHC card for my Canon SD1000 camera. I recently bought the Transcend 16GB SDHC for my new Canon SX20IS. Both cards work very well and I've had no problems with it so far. I wanted to take this opportunity to update my review since my original review was also posted (by Amazon) for the 16GB card. This is because the only difference between these two cards is the different capacity. So, if you're in the market for an affordable high quality SDHC card, this may be the one for you. Sorry, I kind of sounded like a used car salesman right there, didn't I? I assure you that I don't work for Transcend. But, here's why I think this card is awesome:

    Pros:

    -Affordable!

    -Large capacity

    -Class 6 read/write speed (which is very fast... but is no longer the fastest class available)

    -Lifetime warranty (at least that's what the package says :)

    -Transcend is a reputable company that's been making memory products for a very long time. ( I swear to the tech Gods that I don't work for them!) Other reputable and reliable memory card companies include Kingston and PNY. All three of these companies have been making memory chips for many, many years.


    Cons:

    - I can' really think of any "Cons" about this card. But here's the 2 closest things I can come up with right now: (1) "Class 6" is no longer the fastest speed available and (2) This card does NOT make coffee for you in the morning, do your dishes for you, give you compliments when you're having a bad day, or magically improve your photography skills.




    IMPORTANT SPECIAL NOTES ABOUT SDHC MEMORY CARDS:

    -SDHC cards are not compatible with most older SD cameras, SD devices, or SD card readers.

    -SDHC cards are rated by speed using different "classes". There are currently 4 data transfer speed classes available for SDHC cards. These classes are "class 2, class 4, and class 6, and the new class 10. For example, "Class 2" would have the slowest read/write speed while "Class 6" has the fastest read/write speed. So if you have a device in which speed may play a crucial role, make sure you buy a higher "class" SDHC card. Please note that this SDHC card no longer has the fastest read/write speed available. There is now a new class, called "Class 10". Class 6 has a minimum read/write speed of 6MB/sec... while Class 2 has minimum speed rating of 2MB/sec, and Class 4 is 4MB/sec. Starting to see the pattern?


    SO WHAT'S THE DIFFERENCE BETWEEN "SD CARDS" AND "SDHC CARDS?

    SDHC is basically an upgrade to the older SD cards. The reason they upgraded it was to achieve greater data transfer speeds AND capacity than previously possible with normal SD cards... and to do this, they had to redesign the card (which is why it's not compatible with normal SD devices). This was necessary because digital cameras and digital video cameras these days have higher resolutions, which equate to larger file sizes and faster data transfer needs.

    Now that many digital cameras also can record HD video, you may consider getting a larger capacity card because video takes much more space than photos. The size of the video varies from camera to camera depending on what resolution and video compression the camera uses. If you plan on taking lots of video (especially HD video), I would consider getting at least a 16GB card. Check your camera specifications to see how many minutes per Gig of memory your camera can capture ...to gauge how big of a memory card you'll want to get to meet your needs.

    Special Note on regular SD Cards:
    If you primarily take casual photos and don't need a exceptionally fast read/write capable card, you should know that newer cameras that take "SDHC" cards will also work with older normal "SD" cards. These older cards are cheaper than the new SDHC cards, so this may be something to consider. So to sum things up, newer cameras will take SDHC and regular SD cards, but older cameras that use SD cards may not be able to use SDHC cards. This is because newer technology is usually made to be compatible with older technology (the technical term used to describe this is "backwards compatibility") ... but older technology may not have the hardware necessary to run newer tech (technical term used is "obsolete"... just kidding! ;)

    I hope I haven't confused everybody by going into this much detail, but I can't help being the nerd that I am. If you are confused, don't hesitate to comment on this post and I will try my best to answer your questions. Also, any feedback is always welcome!

    Conclusion: Buy the card if you have a new device that uses SDHC. It rocks! (This message has been approved by the "Duke of New Mexico")


    4-0 out of 5 stars Transcend 4 GB Class 6 SDHC Card - Good Card for SDHC Compatible Devices, May 10, 2008
    UPDATE - March 2, 2010: This review was originally written for the 4 GB class 6 SDHC card, but the reviews have been grouped for all class 6 SDHC cards in the 4, 8, 16 and 32 GB sizes. All the cards should perform similarly since they are all class 6 and all made by Transcend. However, I will have to check which cards I have used hands on. I believe I only own the 4GB and 8GB cards. I will update the review further. If you have concerns regarding the 16GB or 32GB sizes, you should seek out the reviews tagged with the product links from those cards.


    The Transcend 4GB SDHC CARD (Class 6) is a great card for the price. I was at first a little skeptical about the brand, but I buy way too many memory cards to ignore a good price when I see one. And I'm happy to report that I've experienced decent performance and reliability issues with this card. That's as compared to other cards I own including SanDisk, PNY and Kingston.

    As long as your devices are compatible with the SDHC format, this card is a good buy. 4 GB is a nice size though I do prefer 8 GB capacity for high capacity storage.

    The class 6 speed is the fastest speed available in mass market SDHC cards. Class 6 guarantees minimum transfer speeds of 6 MBs, but I've gotten speeds up to 20Mbs! That makes this card perfect for storing pictures in RAW image formats.

    The Class 6 speed is on par with the Sandisk Extreme III cards that on average are about $15 to $20 more per card. If you don't have an SDHC reader, you may opt to get the package with a reader included to download your pics. If not you can just transfer your pics directly from your camera with your card still inserted. An SDHC card reader can be bought separately if your PC doesn't have a compatible slot.

    General SDHC and SD Card Tips

    There are a few tips that I've learned the hard way through buying TOO MANY different memory cards.
    1. Make sure your device is compatible with the card! Even in regular SD cards, some older electronics aren't compatible with that large of a size (2 GB). In terms of SDHC cards, make sure your camera or other device is SDHC compatible. SDHC is different from regular SD and only newer devices tend to have built-in compatibility
    2. Once you install this in your camera or device, you will generally want to format the card with your compatible device's interface. That is because the standard formats for certain devices, particularly Canon, are different from the factory installed format
    3. Just like your devices, most computer SD card readers are not compatible with the SDHC format. So use a card reader or download the pictures via USB connection to the camera with the card still installed.
    4. For some reason, placing the card in the locked position allows some older laptops to still read it. This is just to be used in a pinch however, and it won't apply to all systems
    5. If you did not properly format your card, you may be able to save things to it and then have them "disappear." If this happens to you, make sure you use the software recovery tools BEFORE you try to save anything else to your card. That way, you can retrieve your images without over-writing them.
    6. Make sure you know what you are going to use this card for. Once you have set up everything and ensured it's all compatible, you still have to decide on speed. If you are using this for storing RAW images instead of JPEGs or HD video, step up to the faster class 6 speed format if you can afford it.
    7. If you are going to pay more for a faster speed, make sure your device can benefit from it. I've read, for example, that Kodak cameras are set to a fixed voltage and cannot go faster than standard speed. So the extra cash spent on Class 4, 5, or 6 is basically wasted.

    Conclusion

    It's great to have several extra cards on hand just in case. This 4 GB card is a nice performer. If you have a high capacity camera (10 Megapixels or more) and are storing videos or RAW images, the extra cash for the 8GB card is worth it. Or you may want to step up to the larger 16 GB size that is now available.

    Enjoy!

    4-0 out of 5 stars Transcend 32 GB SDHC Review, May 25, 2009
    Before you drop 120~$ for a SD card ask yourself, Do you really need 32GB card? because the card itself with same specs costs only 35$ for the 16GB version, anyway here is info that might help you

    Pros :
    1- Class 6 Card the(guaranteed minimum Read/write speed of 6MB/s)
    2- My Test Results 18.2-18.5MB/S Read - 11.6-11.8 Write (very stable)
    3- Faster than average cards and almost close to top speed SDHC cards
    4- 32GB in a single small chip is awesome(You can use it as a portable HD once in a while, i share some stuff with my friends with it sometimes


    Cons :
    1- Expensive
    2- You can get two 16GB cards for around only 70$ and save yourself 50$~
    3- Slow write speeds for a 32GB card (Takes forever to fill it with DATA from PC, its not the card fault though , its just the SDHC technology is getting old and slow for 2009 standards , time for newer Tech)

    * Important Info

    Avoid the Sandisk Ultra Series they never reach the true marketed speed "15MB-20MB/S" its just in theory speed like how everybody knows that USB2 is much slower than its specs, and they are only Class 2 for the 32GB version which will drop frames from your HD video (Plus Class 4 is minimum requirement for shooting in HD ) if you plan to get San disk Card then get the Extreme III Series (but again from my own Tests there read speed is about 20MB not 30MB and the write speed is 14MB/s~ instead of the transcend 11MB/s write speed (Unless you spam shooting pictures with your DSLR you don't "need" faster speed)

    I bought This card because i plan to take videos with my HD camcorder that last more 2 Hours, if you do not plan to shoot for longtime then you are better with getting the 16GB card HOWEVER, if you are lazy like my mom and do not plan to transfer DATA from the card to Your computer HD after every trip, then get the 32GB card.or you gonna end up on a trip and a message pops "No memory"

    If you plan to shoot for longer time, check your camcorder battery too does it even last that long? so be sure about that before you drop over 100$ for this card

    1-0 out of 5 stars product failed., July 26, 2009
    Well, it was great while it lasted. Unfortunately, it did not last long.

    Like other reviewers, after <20 use cycles the device failed and I got a "lock" error when, in fact, the write-protection lock was not engaged. Oddly, by engaging the lock (i.e. entering read-only mode) I was able to remove the picture files from the card. Obviously, further use in the camera was impossible; I was also unable to reformat the card (either with my camera or with the SD Associations free software [..]).

    This card has a high average rating but I would urge customers to consider the number of 1-star ratings due to complete product failure before they purchase this item.



    5-0 out of 5 stars My Canon loves the 8 GB SDHC card, January 15, 2008
    I recently purchased a Canon Powershot A720IS digital camera that is capable of recognizing and using up to 2 TERRABYTES of memory card (in the future) so I wanted to get the largest memory card I could install for now. I wanted to use the camera both on dry land and with an underwater housing for shooting stills and video on dive trips. Camera specs said an 8 GB SDHC card would record one hour of hi res video at 30 fps. Or nearly 2300 hi res stills at 8 megapixels.

    A test of the Transcend 8GB SDHC card in the camera ended up shooting 70 minutes of full screen, 30fps digital video that could not be distinguished from my DV camcorder video quality. Playback from the memory card to the TV was so fast & efficient there was never a single "stutter" on the screen. The card speed is genuinely FAST as advertised. Low level formatting of the card allowed for very acceptable rapid-fire sequential still photo shooting speeds when light levels were bright enough that the flash was not needed/used. Something like 2 photos every 3 seconds. Files were flawless in display, both for stills and video.

    This product was significantly lower in price than the Kingston 8GB SDHC card I originally bought with the camera. I've used both interchangeably and cannot see any different in the speed or capacity and quality of imagery is identical. For the money I'll stick with Transcend and am looking forward to getting their 16GB card once the price drops substantially below the $100 mark. That would provide nearly 2 1/2 hours of video on my still camera or 4600 highest quality stills. I'm afraid my camcorder will be collecting dust much of the time. A big advantage to video on the card is there are NO MOVING PARTS, e.g. a mini DV tape cassette and camcorder or VCR playback unit needed to dump the video and stills to my Mac for editing and burning DVDs. I just stick the card in the MicroMate USB card reader, plug it in the computer and bingo, ready to sort thru and dump to the hard drive. Since the card is formatted by a Canon camera it automatically boots up the Canon Viewer software too. That should work the same for other brands of still cameras formatting this chip.

    3-0 out of 5 stars The Fastest Card at This Price But..., June 26, 2007
    This SDHC card is the fastest one in its price range but it may cause your images to be lost.

    I use two of this in a Canon SD750. After the first use, all of the images were lost. (But thank God, I could rescue them with Lexar Image Rescue 2, a program better than its competitors) Then I formated the card(s) in the camera(s) with "low level format" option several times and there has been no problem after that so far.

    I can suggest these points to potential owners of this card:
    1- Use it very carefully, make backups if possible.
    2- Format it several times before the first use with "low level format" option.
    3- If you loose your images, don't panic. At this situation, It is very important not to take anymore pictures. If you take pictures after this point, you can overwrite your lost images and there can be no chance to get them back. Connect your card to your computer with a card reader (SDHC Compatible) and rescue them with Lexar Image Rescue.

    5-0 out of 5 stars Excellent Mini Hard Drive equivalent, December 11, 2007
    This card is able to hold a complete DVD movie, thousands of songs/photos, or just serve as a backup device for one's files.

    It operates very well - I now have purchased 3 and with each use its value becomes more apparent.

    One word of caution - even though most laptops and systems have an SD card slot, older computers may not be able to recognize or write to this card. Make sure your system has the ability to read SDHC configured products.

    If you do not have an SD slot you can purchase an tiny SD reader (very inexpensive) that plugs into your USB port.

    4-0 out of 5 stars Great value, just be careful..., January 2, 2009
    I recently ordered this card as an accessory for my Acer Aspire One netbook PC. The card took a little while to ship, about 8 days, but that wasn't a big deal. The card has lots of space, and the read speeds are quite impressive. I mostly use it to run and store portable software, and it does a very good job at that.

    My only complaint is that when I first inserted the card into my PC it attempted to install some adware. The program was from a company called RelevantKnowledge, and they gather your information for market research purposes. Luckily my spyware software picked it up immediately,so I was able to delete it. Afterward I formatted the card, and now I'm happy as can be.

    5-0 out of 5 stars Reliable card, good speeds!, December 4, 2008
    Transcend 16 GB SDHC SD Class 6 Flash Memory Card TS16GSDHC6E [Amazon Frustration-Free Packaging]
    I have 4 of these cards that I use in my Panasonic HMC-150, a professional grade video camera. I've run read/write tests on all of them and they get about 14 MB/s write speeds and 17.5 MB/s read speeds. Never encountered any errors! These cards are the best bang for your buck, and the frustration free packaging is awesome.

    1-0 out of 5 stars Don't Let This Happen to You....., August 3, 2008
    It's great to have 8GB of memory but it is a double edged sword. Today after using this card for only the second time, it failed on me. I lost almost 200 precious images - gone forever. I am what you would call an enthusiast or hobbyist. I love photography and spend every spare minute, which is very seldom these days, pursuing my passion. So I do a fair amount of experimentation. These cards are great when they work - but if they fail you even once - the results can be catastrophic. Maybe I am the unlucky 1 of 250 reviewers with a bad experience with this product, but I feel it is my responsibility to report this to everyone. I hope it never happens to you. It is human nature for me to wonder, if I had spent a few more dollars for a better brand name, would my photos be intact today?

    5-0 out of 5 stars Great affordable SDHC card, March 28, 2008
    In the past, I bought a Transcend 8GB SDHC card for my Canon SD1000 camera. I recently bought the Transcend 16GB SDHC for my new Canon SX20IS. Both cards work very well and I've had no problems with it so far. I wanted to take this opportunity to update my review since my original review was also posted (by Amazon) for the 16GB card. This is because the only difference between these two cards is the different capacity. So, if you're in the market for an affordable high quality SDHC card, this may be the one for you. Sorry, I kind of sounded like a used car salesman right there, didn't I? I assure you that I don't work for Transcend. But, here's why I think this card is awesome:

    Pros:

    -Affordable!

    -Large capacity

    -Class 6 read/write speed (which is very fast... but is no longer the fastest class available)

    -Lifetime warranty (at least that's what the package says :)

    -Transcend is a reputable company that's been making memory products for a very long time. ( I swear to the tech Gods that I don't work for them!) Other reputable and reliable memory card companies include Kingston and PNY. All three of these companies have been making memory chips for many, many years.


    Cons:

    - I can' really think of any "Cons" about this card. But here's the 2 closest things I can come up with right now: (1) "Class 6" is no longer the fastest speed available and (2) This card does NOT make coffee for you in the morning, do your dishes for you, give you compliments when you're having a bad day, or magically improve your photography skills.




    IMPORTANT SPECIAL NOTES ABOUT SDHC MEMORY CARDS:

    -SDHC cards are not compatible with most older SD cameras, SD devices, or SD card readers.

    -SDHC cards are rated by speed using different "classes". There are currently 4 data transfer speed classes available for SDHC cards. These classes are "class 2, class 4, and class 6, and the new class 10. For example, "Class 2" would have the slowest read/write speed while "Class 6" has the fastest read/write speed. So if you have a device in which speed may play a crucial role, make sure you buy a higher "class" SDHC card. Please note that this SDHC card no longer has the fastest read/write speed available. There is now a new class, called "Class 10". Class 6 has a minimum read/write speed of 6MB/sec... while Class 2 has minimum speed rating of 2MB/sec, and Class 4 is 4MB/sec. Starting to see the pattern?


    SO WHAT'S THE DIFFERENCE BETWEEN "SD CARDS" AND "SDHC CARDS?

    SDHC is basically an upgrade to the older SD cards. The reason they upgraded it was to achieve greater data transfer speeds AND capacity than previously possible with normal SD cards... and to do this, they had to redesign the card (which is why it's not compatible with normal SD devices). This was necessary because digital cameras and digital video cameras these days have higher resolutions, which equate to larger file sizes and faster data transfer needs.

    Now that many digital cameras also can record HD video, you may consider getting a larger capacity card because video takes much more space than photos. The size of the video varies from camera to camera depending on what resolution and video compression the camera uses. If you plan on taking lots of video (especially HD video), I would consider getting at least a 16GB card. Check your camera specifications to see how many minutes per Gig of memory your camera can capture ...to gauge how big of a memory card you'll want to get to meet your needs.

    Special Note on regular SD Cards:
    If you primarily take casual photos and don't need a exceptionally fast read/write capable card, you should know that newer cameras that take "SDHC" cards will also work with older normal "SD" cards. These older cards are cheaper than the new SDHC cards, so this may be something to consider. So to sum things up, newer cameras will take SDHC and regular SD cards, but older cameras that use SD cards may not be able to use SDHC cards. This is because newer technology is usually made to be compatible with older technology (the technical term used to describe this is "backwards compatibility") ... but older technology may not have the hardware necessary to run newer tech (technical term used is "obsolete"... just kidding! ;)

    I hope I haven't confused everybody by going into this much detail, but I can't help being the nerd that I am. If you are confused, don't hesitate to comment on this post and I will try my best to answer your questions. Also, any feedback is always welcome!

    Conclusion: Buy the card if you have a new device that uses SDHC. It rocks! (This message has been approved by the "Duke of New Mexico")


    4-0 out of 5 stars Transcend 4 GB Class 6 SDHC Card - Good Card for SDHC Compatible Devices, May 10, 2008
    UPDATE - March 2, 2010: This review was originally written for the 4 GB class 6 SDHC card, but the reviews have been grouped for all class 6 SDHC cards in the 4, 8, 16 and 32 GB sizes. All the cards should perform similarly since they are all class 6 and all made by Transcend. However, I will have to check which cards I have used hands on. I believe I only own the 4GB and 8GB cards. I will update the review further. If you have concerns regarding the 16GB or 32GB sizes, you should seek out the reviews tagged with the product links from those cards.


    The Transcend 4GB SDHC CARD (Class 6) is a great card for the price. I was at first a little skeptical about the brand, but I buy way too many memory cards to ignore a good price when I see one. And I'm happy to report that I've experienced decent performance and reliability issues with this card. That's as compared to other cards I own including SanDisk, PNY and Kingston.

    As long as your devices are compatible with the SDHC format, this card is a good buy. 4 GB is a nice size though I do prefer 8 GB capacity for high capacity storage.

    The class 6 speed is the fastest speed available in mass market SDHC cards. Class 6 guarantees minimum transfer speeds of 6 MBs, but I've gotten speeds up to 20Mbs! That makes this card perfect for storing pictures in RAW image formats.

    The Class 6 speed is on par with the Sandisk Extreme III cards that on average are about $15 to $20 more per card. If you don't have an SDHC reader, you may opt to get the package with a reader included to download your pics. If not you can just transfer your pics directly from your camera with your card still inserted. An SDHC card reader can be bought separately if your PC doesn't have a compatible slot.

    General SDHC and SD Card Tips

    There are a few tips that I've learned the hard way through buying TOO MANY different memory cards.
    1. Make sure your device is compatible with the card! Even in regular SD cards, some older electronics aren't compatible with that large of a size (2 GB). In terms of SDHC cards, make sure your camera or other device is SDHC compatible. SDHC is different from regular SD and only newer devices tend to have built-in compatibility
    2. Once you install this in your camera or device, you will generally want to format the card with your compatible device's interface. That is because the standard formats for certain devices, particularly Canon, are different from the factory installed format
    3. Just like your devices, most computer SD card readers are not compatible with the SDHC format. So use a card reader or download the pictures via USB connection to the camera with the card still installed.
    4. For some reason, placing the card in the locked position allows some older laptops to still read it. This is just to be used in a pinch however, and it won't apply to all systems
    5. If you did not properly format your card, you may be able to save things to it and then have them "disappear." If this happens to you, make sure you use the software recovery tools BEFORE you try to save anything else to your card. That way, you can retrieve your images without over-writing them.
    6. Make sure you know what you are going to use this card for. Once you have set up everything and ensured it's all compatible, you still have to decide on speed. If you are using this for storing RAW images instead of JPEGs or HD video, step up to the faster class 6 speed format if you can afford it.
    7. If you are going to pay more for a faster speed, make sure your device can benefit from it. I've read, for example, that Kodak cameras are set to a fixed voltage and cannot go faster than standard speed. So the extra cash spent on Class 4, 5, or 6 is basically wasted.

    Conclusion

    It's great to have several extra cards on hand just in case. This 4 GB card is a nice performer. If you have a high capacity camera (10 Megapixels or more) and are storing videos or RAW images, the extra cash for the 8GB card is worth it. Or you may want to step up to the larger 16 GB size that is now available.

    Enjoy!

    4-0 out of 5 stars Transcend 32 GB SDHC Review, May 25, 2009
    Before you drop 120~$ for a SD card ask yourself, Do you really need 32GB card? because the card itself with same specs costs only 35$ for the 16GB version, anyway here is info that might help you

    Pros :
    1- Class 6 Card the(guaranteed minimum Read/write speed of 6MB/s)
    2- My Test Results 18.2-18.5MB/S Read - 11.6-11.8 Write (very stable)
    3- Faster than average cards and almost close to top speed SDHC cards
    4- 32GB in a single small chip is awesome(You can use it as a portable HD once in a while, i share some stuff with my friends with it sometimes


    Cons :
    1- Expensive
    2- You can get two 16GB cards for around only 70$ and save yourself 50$~
    3- Slow write speeds for a 32GB card (Takes forever to fill it with DATA from PC, its not the card fault though , its just the SDHC technology is getting old and slow for 2009 standards , time for newer Tech)

    * Important Info

    Avoid the Sandisk Ultra Series they never reach the true marketed speed "15MB-20MB/S" its just in theory speed like how everybody knows that USB2 is much slower than its specs, and they are only Class 2 for the 32GB version which will drop frames from your HD video (Plus Class 4 is minimum requirement for shooting in HD ) if you plan to get San disk Card then get the Extreme III Series (but again from my own Tests there read speed is about 20MB not 30MB and the write speed is 14MB/s~ instead of the transcend 11MB/s write speed (Unless you spam shooting pictures with your DSLR you don't "need" faster speed)

    I bought This card because i plan to take videos with my HD camcorder that last more 2 Hours, if you do not plan to shoot for longtime then you are better with getting the 16GB card HOWEVER, if you are lazy like my mom and do not plan to transfer DATA from the card to Your computer HD after every trip, then get the 32GB card.or you gonna end up on a trip and a message pops "No memory"

    If you plan to shoot for longer time, check your camcorder battery too does it even last that long? so be sure about that before you drop over 100$ for this card

    1-0 out of 5 stars product failed., July 26, 2009
    Well, it was great while it lasted. Unfortunately, it did not last long.

    Like other reviewers, after <20 use cycles the device failed and I got a "lock" error when, in fact, the write-protection lock was not engaged. Oddly, by engaging the lock (i.e. entering read-only mode) I was able to remove the picture files from the card. Obviously, further use in the camera was impossible; I was also unable to reformat the card (either with my camera or with the SD Associations free software [..]).

    This card has a high average rating but I would urge customers to consider the number of 1-star ratings due to complete product failure before they purchase this item.



    5-0 out of 5 stars My Canon loves the 8 GB SDHC card, January 15, 2008
    I recently purchased a Canon Powershot A720IS digital camera that is capable of recognizing and using up to 2 TERRABYTES of memory card (in the future) so I wanted to get the largest memory card I could install for now. I wanted to use the camera both on dry land and with an underwater housing for shooting stills and video on dive trips. Camera specs said an 8 GB SDHC card would record one hour of hi res video at 30 fps. Or nearly 2300 hi res stills at 8 megapixels.

    A test of the Transcend 8GB SDHC card in the camera ended up shooting 70 minutes of full screen, 30fps digital video that could not be distinguished from my DV camcorder video quality. Playback from the memory card to the TV was so fast & efficient there was never a single "stutter" on the screen. The card speed is genuinely FAST as advertised. Low level formatting of the card allowed for very acceptable rapid-fire sequential still photo shooting speeds when light levels were bright enough that the flash was not needed/used. Something like 2 photos every 3 seconds. Files were flawless in display, both for stills and video.

    This product was significantly lower in price than the Kingston 8GB SDHC card I originally bought with the camera. I've used both interchangeably and cannot see any different in the speed or capacity and quality of imagery is identical. For the money I'll stick with Transcend and am looking forward to getting their 16GB card once the price drops substantially below the $100 mark. That would provide nearly 2 1/2 hours of video on my still camera or 4600 highest quality stills. I'm afraid my camcorder will be collecting dust much of the time. A big advantage to video on the card is there are NO MOVING PARTS, e.g. a mini DV tape cassette and camcorder or VCR playback unit needed to dump the video and stills to my Mac for editing and burning DVDs. I just stick the card in the MicroMate USB card reader, plug it in the computer and bingo, ready to sort thru and dump to the hard drive. Since the card is formatted by a Canon camera it automatically boots up the Canon Viewer software too. That should work the same for other brands of still cameras formatting this chip.

    3-0 out of 5 stars The Fastest Card at This Price But..., June 26, 2007
    This SDHC card is the fastest one in its price range but it may cause your images to be lost.

    I use two of this in a Canon SD750. After the first use, all of the images were lost. (But thank God, I could rescue them with Lexar Image Rescue 2, a program better than its competitors) Then I formated the card(s) in the camera(s) with "low level format" option several times and there has been no problem after that so far.

    I can suggest these points to potential owners of this card:
    1- Use it very carefully, make backups if possible.
    2- Format it several times before the first use with "low level format" option.
    3- If you loose your images, don't panic. At this situation, It is very important not to take anymore pictures. If you take pictures after this point, you can overwrite your lost images and there can be no chance to get them back. Connect your card to your computer with a card reader (SDHC Compatible) and rescue them with Lexar Image Rescue.

    5-0 out of 5 stars Excellent Mini Hard Drive equivalent, December 11, 2007
    This card is able to hold a complete DVD movie, thousands of songs/photos, or just serve as a backup device for one's files.

    It operates very well - I now have purchased 3 and with each use its value becomes more apparent.

    One word of caution - even though most laptops and systems have an SD card slot, older computers may not be able to recognize or write to this card. Make sure your system has the ability to read SDHC configured products.

    If you do not have an SD slot you can purchase an tiny SD reader (very inexpensive) that plugs into your USB port.

    4-0 out of 5 stars Great value, just be careful..., January 2, 2009
    I recently ordered this card as an accessory for my Acer Aspire One netbook PC. The card took a little while to ship, about 8 days, but that wasn't a big deal. The card has lots of space, and the read speeds are quite impressive. I mostly use it to run and store portable software, and it does a very good job at that.

    My only complaint is that when I first inserted the card into my PC it attempted to install some adware. The program was from a company called RelevantKnowledge, and they gather your information for market research purposes. Luckily my spyware software picked it up immediately,so I was able to delete it. Afterward I formatted the card, and now I'm happy as can be.

    5-0 out of 5 stars Reliable card, good speeds!, December 4, 2008
    Transcend 16 GB SDHC SD Class 6 Flash Memory Card TS16GSDHC6E [Amazon Frustration-Free Packaging]
    I have 4 of these cards that I use in my Panasonic HMC-150, a professional grade video camera. I've run read/write tests on all of them and they get about 14 MB/s write speeds and 17.5 MB/s read speeds. Never encountered any errors! These cards are the best bang for your buck, and the frustration free packaging is awesome.

    1-0 out of 5 stars Don't Let This Happen to You....., August 3, 2008
    It's great to have 8GB of memory but it is a double edged sword. Today after using this card for only the second time, it failed on me. I lost almost 200 precious images - gone forever. I am what you would call an enthusiast or hobbyist. I love photography and spend every spare minute, which is very seldom these days, pursuing my passion. So I do a fair amount of experimentation. These cards are great when they work - but if they fail you even once - the results can be catastrophic. Maybe I am the unlucky 1 of 250 reviewers with a bad experience with this product, but I feel it is my responsibility to report this to everyone. I hope it never happens to you. It is human nature for me to wonder, if I had spent a few more dollars for a better brand name, would my photos be intact today? Read more


    5. Transcend 8 GB Class 6 SDHC Flash Memory Card TS8GSDHC6
    Electronics
    list price: $42.92 -- our price: $13.60
    (price subject to change: see help)
    Asin: B000P9ZBFA
    Manufacturer: TRANSCEND
    Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars
    US | Canada | United Kingdom | Germany | France | Japan

    Editorial Review

    SDHC (SD High-Capacity) is the new generation of SD cards (Version 2.0). Formatted in FAT32, SDHC cards reach a maximum capacity of 32GB and can fulfill the high-capacity demand of the new SDHC devices such as Casio Exilim Z1000/Z600/S600 cameras, Panasonic DMC-L1 camera, and HP printer A/B. Now you can enjoy a high-quality digital life and store all of your MP3 music files, high-resolution pictures, and video clips in your SDHC card. ... Read more

    Reviews

    5-0 out of 5 stars Great affordable SDHC card, March 28, 2008
    UPDATE - March 2, 2010: This review was originally written for the 4 GB class 6 SDHC card, but the reviews have been grouped for all class 6 SDHC cards in the 4, 8, 16 and 32 GB sizes. All the cards should perform similarly since they are all class 6 and all made by Transcend. However, I will have to check which cards I have used hands on. I believe I only own the 4GB and 8GB cards. I will update the review further. If you have concerns regarding the 16GB or 32GB sizes, you should seek out the reviews tagged with the product links from those cards.


    The Transcend 4GB SDHC CARD (Class 6) is a great card for the price. I was at first a little skeptical about the brand, but I buy way too many memory cards to ignore a good price when I see one. And I'm happy to report that I've experienced decent performance and reliability issues with this card. That's as compared to other cards I own including SanDisk, PNY and Kingston.

    As long as your devices are compatible with the SDHC format, this card is a good buy. 4 GB is a nice size though I do prefer 8 GB capacity for high capacity storage.

    The class 6 speed is the fastest speed available in mass market SDHC cards. Class 6 guarantees minimum transfer speeds of 6 MBs, but I've gotten speeds up to 20Mbs! That makes this card perfect for storing pictures in RAW image formats.

    The Class 6 speed is on par with the Sandisk Extreme III cards that on average are about $15 to $20 more per card. If you don't have an SDHC reader, you may opt to get the package with a reader included to download your pics. If not you can just transfer your pics directly from your camera with your card still inserted. An SDHC card reader can be bought separately if your PC doesn't have a compatible slot.

    General SDHC and SD Card Tips

    There are a few tips that I've learned the hard way through buying TOO MANY different memory cards.
    1. Make sure your device is compatible with the card! Even in regular SD cards, some older electronics aren't compatible with that large of a size (2 GB). In terms of SDHC cards, make sure your camera or other device is SDHC compatible. SDHC is different from regular SD and only newer devices tend to have built-in compatibility
    2. Once you install this in your camera or device, you will generally want to format the card with your compatible device's interface. That is because the standard formats for certain devices, particularly Canon, are different from the factory installed format
    3. Just like your devices, most computer SD card readers are not compatible with the SDHC format. So use a card reader or download the pictures via USB connection to the camera with the card still installed.
    4. For some reason, placing the card in the locked position allows some older laptops to still read it. This is just to be used in a pinch however, and it won't apply to all systems
    5. If you did not properly format your card, you may be able to save things to it and then have them "disappear." If this happens to you, make sure you use the software recovery tools BEFORE you try to save anything else to your card. That way, you can retrieve your images without over-writing them.
    6. Make sure you know what you are going to use this card for. Once you have set up everything and ensured it's all compatible, you still have to decide on speed. If you are using this for storing RAW images instead of JPEGs or HD video, step up to the faster class 6 speed format if you can afford it.
    7. If you are going to pay more for a faster speed, make sure your device can benefit from it. I've read, for example, that Kodak cameras are set to a fixed voltage and cannot go faster than standard speed. So the extra cash spent on Class 4, 5, or 6 is basically wasted.

    Conclusion

    It's great to have several extra cards on hand just in case. This 4 GB card is a nice performer. If you have a high capacity camera (10 Megapixels or more) and are storing videos or RAW images, the extra cash for the 8GB card is worth it. Or you may want to step up to the larger 16 GB size that is now available.

    Enjoy!

    4-0 out of 5 stars Transcend 32 GB SDHC Review, May 25, 2009
    Before you drop 120~$ for a SD card ask yourself, Do you really need 32GB card? because the card itself with same specs costs only 35$ for the 16GB version, anyway here is info that might help you

    Pros :
    1- Class 6 Card the(guaranteed minimum Read/write speed of 6MB/s)
    2- My Test Results 18.2-18.5MB/S Read - 11.6-11.8 Write (very stable)
    3- Faster than average cards and almost close to top speed SDHC cards
    4- 32GB in a single small chip is awesome(You can use it as a portable HD once in a while, i share some stuff with my friends with it sometimes


    Cons :
    1- Expensive
    2- You can get two 16GB cards for around only 70$ and save yourself 50$~
    3- Slow write speeds for a 32GB card (Takes forever to fill it with DATA from PC, its not the card fault though , its just the SDHC technology is getting old and slow for 2009 standards , time for newer Tech)

    * Important Info

    Avoid the Sandisk Ultra Series they never reach the true marketed speed "15MB-20MB/S" its just in theory speed like how everybody knows that USB2 is much slower than its specs, and they are only Class 2 for the 32GB version which will drop frames from your HD video (Plus Class 4 is minimum requirement for shooting in HD ) if you plan to get San disk Card then get the Extreme III Series (but again from my own Tests there read speed is about 20MB not 30MB and the write speed is 14MB/s~ instead of the transcend 11MB/s write speed (Unless you spam shooting pictures with your DSLR you don't "need" faster speed)

    I bought This card because i plan to take videos with my HD camcorder that last more 2 Hours, if you do not plan to shoot for longtime then you are better with getting the 16GB card HOWEVER, if you are lazy like my mom and do not plan to transfer DATA from the card to Your computer HD after every trip, then get the 32GB card.or you gonna end up on a trip and a message pops "No memory"

    If you plan to shoot for longer time, check your camcorder battery too does it even last that long? so be sure about that before you drop over 100$ for this card

    1-0 out of 5 stars product failed., July 26, 2009
    Well, it was great while it lasted. Unfortunately, it did not last long.

    Like other reviewers, after <20 use cycles the device failed and I got a "lock" error when, in fact, the write-protection lock was not engaged. Oddly, by engaging the lock (i.e. entering read-only mode) I was able to remove the picture files from the card. Obviously, further use in the camera was impossible; I was also unable to reformat the card (either with my camera or with the SD Associations free software [..]).

    This card has a high average rating but I would urge customers to consider the number of 1-star ratings due to complete product failure before they purchase this item.



    5-0 out of 5 stars My Canon loves the 8 GB SDHC card, January 15, 2008
    This SDHC card is the fastest one in its price range but it may cause your images to be lost.

    I use two of this in a Canon SD750. After the first use, all of the images were lost. (But thank God, I could rescue them with Lexar Image Rescue 2, a program better than its competitors) Then I formated the card(s) in the camera(s) with "low level format" option several times and there has been no problem after that so far.

    I can suggest these points to potential owners of this card:
    1- Use it very carefully, make backups if possible.
    2- Format it several times before the first use with "low level format" option.
    3- If you loose your images, don't panic. At this situation, It is very important not to take anymore pictures. If you take pictures after this point, you can overwrite your lost images and there can be no chance to get them back. Connect your card to your computer with a card reader (SDHC Compatible) and rescue them with Lexar Image Rescue.

    5-0 out of 5 stars Excellent Mini Hard Drive equivalent, December 11, 2007
    I recently ordered this card as an accessory for my Acer Aspire One netbook PC. The card took a little while to ship, about 8 days, but that wasn't a big deal. The card has lots of space, and the read speeds are quite impressive. I mostly use it to run and store portable software, and it does a very good job at that.

    My only complaint is that when I first inserted the card into my PC it attempted to install some adware. The program was from a company called RelevantKnowledge, and they gather your information for market research purposes. Luckily my spyware software picked it up immediately,so I was able to delete it. Afterward I formatted the card, and now I'm happy as can be.

    5-0 out of 5 stars Reliable card, good speeds!, December 4, 2008
    Transcend 16 GB SDHC SD Class 6 Flash Memory Card TS16GSDHC6E [Amazon Frustration-Free Packaging]
    I have 4 of these cards that I use in my Panasonic HMC-150, a professional grade video camera. I've run read/write tests on all of them and they get about 14 MB/s write speeds and 17.5 MB/s read speeds. Never encountered any errors! These cards are the best bang for your buck, and the frustration free packaging is awesome.

    5-0 out of 5 stars Great affordable SDHC card, March 28, 2008
    In the past, I bought a Transcend 8GB SDHC card for my Canon SD1000 camera. I recently bought the Transcend 16GB SDHC for my new Canon SX20IS. Both cards work very well and I've had no problems with it so far. I wanted to take this opportunity to update my review since my original review was also posted (by Amazon) for the 16GB card. This is because the only difference between these two cards is the different capacity. So, if you're in the market for an affordable high quality SDHC card, this may be the one for you. Sorry, I kind of sounded like a used car salesman right there, didn't I? I assure you that I don't work for Transcend. But, here's why I think this card is awesome:

    Pros:

    -Affordable!

    -Large capacity

    -Class 6 read/write speed (which is very fast... but is no longer the fastest class available)

    -Lifetime warranty (at least that's what the package says :)

    -Transcend is a reputable company that's been making memory products for a very long time. ( I swear to the tech Gods that I don't work for them!) Other reputable and reliable memory card companies include Kingston and PNY. All three of these companies have been making memory chips for many, many years.


    Cons:

    - I can' really think of any "Cons" about this card. But here's the 2 closest things I can come up with right now: (1) "Class 6" is no longer the fastest speed available and (2) This card does NOT make coffee for you in the morning, do your dishes for you, give you compliments when you're having a bad day, or magically improve your photography skills.




    IMPORTANT SPECIAL NOTES ABOUT SDHC MEMORY CARDS:

    -SDHC cards are not compatible with most older SD cameras, SD devices, or SD card readers.

    -SDHC cards are rated by speed using different "classes". There are currently 4 data transfer speed classes available for SDHC cards. These classes are "class 2, class 4, and class 6, and the new class 10. For example, "Class 2" would have the slowest read/write speed while "Class 6" has the fastest read/write speed. So if you have a device in which speed may play a crucial role, make sure you buy a higher "class" SDHC card. Please note that this SDHC card no longer has the fastest read/write speed available. There is now a new class, called "Class 10". Class 6 has a minimum read/write speed of 6MB/sec... while Class 2 has minimum speed rating of 2MB/sec, and Class 4 is 4MB/sec. Starting to see the pattern?


    SO WHAT'S THE DIFFERENCE BETWEEN "SD CARDS" AND "SDHC CARDS?

    SDHC is basically an upgrade to the older SD cards. The reason they upgraded it was to achieve greater data transfer speeds AND capacity than previously possible with normal SD cards... and to do this, they had to redesign the card (which is why it's not compatible with normal SD devices). This was necessary because digital cameras and digital video cameras these days have higher resolutions, which equate to larger file sizes and faster data transfer needs.

    Now that many digital cameras also can record HD video, you may consider getting a larger capacity card because video takes much more space than photos. The size of the video varies from camera to camera depending on what resolution and video compression the camera uses. If you plan on taking lots of video (especially HD video), I would consider getting at least a 16GB card. Check your camera specifications to see how many minutes per Gig of memory your camera can capture ...to gauge how big of a memory card you'll want to get to meet your needs.

    Special Note on regular SD Cards:
    If you primarily take casual photos and don't need a exceptionally fast read/write capable card, you should know that newer cameras that take "SDHC" cards will also work with older normal "SD" cards. These older cards are cheaper than the new SDHC cards, so this may be something to consider. So to sum things up, newer cameras will take SDHC and regular SD cards, but older cameras that use SD cards may not be able to use SDHC cards. This is because newer technology is usually made to be compatible with older technology (the technical term used to describe this is "backwards compatibility") ... but older technology may not have the hardware necessary to run newer tech (technical term used is "obsolete"... just kidding! ;)

    I hope I haven't confused everybody by going into this much detail, but I can't help being the nerd that I am. If you are confused, don't hesitate to comment on this post and I will try my best to answer your questions. Also, any feedback is always welcome!

    Conclusion: Buy the card if you have a new device that uses SDHC. It rocks! (This message has been approved by the "Duke of New Mexico")


    4-0 out of 5 stars Transcend 4 GB Class 6 SDHC Card - Good Card for SDHC Compatible Devices, May 10, 2008
    UPDATE - March 2, 2010: This review was originally written for the 4 GB class 6 SDHC card, but the reviews have been grouped for all class 6 SDHC cards in the 4, 8, 16 and 32 GB sizes. All the cards should perform similarly since they are all class 6 and all made by Transcend. However, I will have to check which cards I have used hands on. I believe I only own the 4GB and 8GB cards. I will update the review further. If you have concerns regarding the 16GB or 32GB sizes, you should seek out the reviews tagged with the product links from those cards.


    The Transcend 4GB SDHC CARD (Class 6) is a great card for the price. I was at first a little skeptical about the brand, but I buy way too many memory cards to ignore a good price when I see one. And I'm happy to report that I've experienced decent performance and reliability issues with this card. That's as compared to other cards I own including SanDisk, PNY and Kingston.

    As long as your devices are compatible with the SDHC format, this card is a good buy. 4 GB is a nice size though I do prefer 8 GB capacity for high capacity storage.

    The class 6 speed is the fastest speed available in mass market SDHC cards. Class 6 guarantees minimum transfer speeds of 6 MBs, but I've gotten speeds up to 20Mbs! That makes this card perfect for storing pictures in RAW image formats.

    The Class 6 speed is on par with the Sandisk Extreme III cards that on average are about $15 to $20 more per card. If you don't have an SDHC reader, you may opt to get the package with a reader included to download your pics. If not you can just transfer your pics directly from your camera with your card still inserted. An SDHC card reader can be bought separately if your PC doesn't have a compatible slot.

    General SDHC and SD Card Tips

    There are a few tips that I've learned the hard way through buying TOO MANY different memory cards.
    1. Make sure your device is compatible with the card! Even in regular SD cards, some older electronics aren't compatible with that large of a size (2 GB). In terms of SDHC cards, make sure your camera or other device is SDHC compatible. SDHC is different from regular SD and only newer devices tend to have built-in compatibility
    2. Once you install this in your camera or device, you will generally want to format the card with your compatible device's interface. That is because the standard formats for certain devices, particularly Canon, are different from the factory installed format
    3. Just like your devices, most computer SD card readers are not compatible with the SDHC format. So use a card reader or download the pictures via USB connection to the camera with the card still installed.
    4. For some reason, placing the card in the locked position allows some older laptops to still read it. This is just to be used in a pinch however, and it won't apply to all systems
    5. If you did not properly format your card, you may be able to save things to it and then have them "disappear." If this happens to you, make sure you use the software recovery tools BEFORE you try to save anything else to your card. That way, you can retrieve your images without over-writing them.
    6. Make sure you know what you are going to use this card for. Once you have set up everything and ensured it's all compatible, you still have to decide on speed. If you are using this for storing RAW images instead of JPEGs or HD video, step up to the faster class 6 speed format if you can afford it.
    7. If you are going to pay more for a faster speed, make sure your device can benefit from it. I've read, for example, that Kodak cameras are set to a fixed voltage and cannot go faster than standard speed. So the extra cash spent on Class 4, 5, or 6 is basically wasted.

    Conclusion

    It's great to have several extra cards on hand just in case. This 4 GB card is a nice performer. If you have a high capacity camera (10 Megapixels or more) and are storing videos or RAW images, the extra cash for the 8GB card is worth it. Or you may want to step up to the larger 16 GB size that is now available.

    Enjoy!

    4-0 out of 5 stars Transcend 32 GB SDHC Review, May 25, 2009
    Before you drop 120~$ for a SD card ask yourself, Do you really need 32GB card? because the card itself with same specs costs only 35$ for the 16GB version, anyway here is info that might help you

    Pros :
    1- Class 6 Card the(guaranteed minimum Read/write speed of 6MB/s)
    2- My Test Results 18.2-18.5MB/S Read - 11.6-11.8 Write (very stable)
    3- Faster than average cards and almost close to top speed SDHC cards
    4- 32GB in a single small chip is awesome(You can use it as a portable HD once in a while, i share some stuff with my friends with it sometimes


    Cons :
    1- Expensive
    2- You can get two 16GB cards for around only 70$ and save yourself 50$~
    3- Slow write speeds for a 32GB card (Takes forever to fill it with DATA from PC, its not the card fault though , its just the SDHC technology is getting old and slow for 2009 standards , time for newer Tech)

    * Important Info

    Avoid the Sandisk Ultra Series they never reach the true marketed speed "15MB-20MB/S" its just in theory speed like how everybody knows that USB2 is much slower than its specs, and they are only Class 2 for the 32GB version which will drop frames from your HD video (Plus Class 4 is minimum requirement for shooting in HD ) if you plan to get San disk Card then get the Extreme III Series (but again from my own Tests there read speed is about 20MB not 30MB and the write speed is 14MB/s~ instead of the transcend 11MB/s write speed (Unless you spam shooting pictures with your DSLR you don't "need" faster speed)

    I bought This card because i plan to take videos with my HD camcorder that last more 2 Hours, if you do not plan to shoot for longtime then you are better with getting the 16GB card HOWEVER, if you are lazy like my mom and do not plan to transfer DATA from the card to Your computer HD after every trip, then get the 32GB card.or you gonna end up on a trip and a message pops "No memory"

    If you plan to shoot for longer time, check your camcorder battery too does it even last that long? so be sure about that before you drop over 100$ for this card

    1-0 out of 5 stars product failed., July 26, 2009
    Well, it was great while it lasted. Unfortunately, it did not last long.

    Like other reviewers, after <20 use cycles the device failed and I got a "lock" error when, in fact, the write-protection lock was not engaged. Oddly, by engaging the lock (i.e. entering read-only mode) I was able to remove the picture files from the card. Obviously, further use in the camera was impossible; I was also unable to reformat the card (either with my camera or with the SD Associations free software [..]).

    This card has a high average rating but I would urge customers to consider the number of 1-star ratings due to complete product failure before they purchase this item.



    5-0 out of 5 stars My Canon loves the 8 GB SDHC card, January 15, 2008
    I recently purchased a Canon Powershot A720IS digital camera that is capable of recognizing and using up to 2 TERRABYTES of memory card (in the future) so I wanted to get the largest memory card I could install for now. I wanted to use the camera both on dry land and with an underwater housing for shooting stills and video on dive trips. Camera specs said an 8 GB SDHC card would record one hour of hi res video at 30 fps. Or nearly 2300 hi res stills at 8 megapixels.

    A test of the Transcend 8GB SDHC card in the camera ended up shooting 70 minutes of full screen, 30fps digital video that could not be distinguished from my DV camcorder video quality. Playback from the memory card to the TV was so fast & efficient there was never a single "stutter" on the screen. The card speed is genuinely FAST as advertised. Low level formatting of the card allowed for very acceptable rapid-fire sequential still photo shooting speeds when light levels were bright enough that the flash was not needed/used. Something like 2 photos every 3 seconds. Files were flawless in display, both for stills and video.

    This product was significantly lower in price than the Kingston 8GB SDHC card I originally bought with the camera. I've used both interchangeably and cannot see any different in the speed or capacity and quality of imagery is identical. For the money I'll stick with Transcend and am looking forward to getting their 16GB card once the price drops substantially below the $100 mark. That would provide nearly 2 1/2 hours of video on my still camera or 4600 highest quality stills. I'm afraid my camcorder will be collecting dust much of the time. A big advantage to video on the card is there are NO MOVING PARTS, e.g. a mini DV tape cassette and camcorder or VCR playback unit needed to dump the video and stills to my Mac for editing and burning DVDs. I just stick the card in the MicroMate USB card reader, plug it in the computer and bingo, ready to sort thru and dump to the hard drive. Since the card is formatted by a Canon camera it automatically boots up the Canon Viewer software too. That should work the same for other brands of still cameras formatting this chip.

    3-0 out of 5 stars The Fastest Card at This Price But..., June 26, 2007
    This SDHC card is the fastest one in its price range but it may cause your images to be lost.

    I use two of this in a Canon SD750. After the first use, all of the images were lost. (But thank God, I could rescue them with Lexar Image Rescue 2, a program better than its competitors) Then I formated the card(s) in the camera(s) with "low level format" option several times and there has been no problem after that so far.

    I can suggest these points to potential owners of this card:
    1- Use it very carefully, make backups if possible.
    2- Format it several times before the first use with "low level format" option.
    3- If you loose your images, don't panic. At this situation, It is very important not to take anymore pictures. If you take pictures after this point, you can overwrite your lost images and there can be no chance to get them back. Connect your card to your computer with a card reader (SDHC Compatible) and rescue them with Lexar Image Rescue.

    5-0 out of 5 stars Excellent Mini Hard Drive equivalent, December 11, 2007
    This card is able to hold a complete DVD movie, thousands of songs/photos, or just serve as a backup device for one's files.

    It operates very well - I now have purchased 3 and with each use its value becomes more apparent.

    One word of caution - even though most laptops and systems have an SD card slot, older computers may not be able to recognize or write to this card. Make sure your system has the ability to read SDHC configured products.

    If you do not have an SD slot you can purchase an tiny SD reader (very inexpensive) that plugs into your USB port.

    4-0 out of 5 stars Great value, just be careful..., January 2, 2009
    I recently ordered this card as an accessory for my Acer Aspire One netbook PC. The card took a little while to ship, about 8 days, but that wasn't a big deal. The card has lots of space, and the read speeds are quite impressive. I mostly use it to run and store portable software, and it does a very good job at that.

    My only complaint is that when I first inserted the card into my PC it attempted to install some adware. The program was from a company called RelevantKnowledge, and they gather your information for market research purposes. Luckily my spyware software picked it up immediately,so I was able to delete it. Afterward I formatted the card, and now I'm happy as can be.

    5-0 out of 5 stars Reliable card, good speeds!, December 4, 2008
    Transcend 16 GB SDHC SD Class 6 Flash Memory Card TS16GSDHC6E [Amazon Frustration-Free Packaging]
    I have 4 of these cards that I use in my Panasonic HMC-150, a professional grade video camera. I've run read/write tests on all of them and they get about 14 MB/s write speeds and 17.5 MB/s read speeds. Never encountered any errors! These cards are the best bang for your buck, and the frustration free packaging is awesome.

    1-0 out of 5 stars Don't Let This Happen to You....., August 3, 2008
    It's great to have 8GB of memory but it is a double edged sword. Today after using this card for only the second time, it failed on me. I lost almost 200 precious images - gone forever. I am what you would call an enthusiast or hobbyist. I love photography and spend every spare minute, which is very seldom these days, pursuing my passion. So I do a fair amount of experimentation. These cards are great when they work - but if they fail you even once - the results can be catastrophic. Maybe I am the unlucky 1 of 250 reviewers with a bad experience with this product, but I feel it is my responsibility to report this to everyone. I hope it never happens to you. It is human nature for me to wonder, if I had spent a few more dollars for a better brand name, would my photos be intact today? Read more


    6. Lexar SDHC 4 GB Class 6 Flash Memory Card 100x Jewel Case Envelope Bulk LSD4GBBE100
    Electronics
    list price: $26.83 -- our price: $22.95
    (price subject to change: see help)
    Asin: B004AM6E8Q
    Manufacturer: LEXAR MEDIA INC
    US | Canada | United Kingdom | Germany | France | Japan

    Editorial Review

    Lexar 4GB SDHC Class 6 High Speed Card ... Read more


    7. Sandisk 4GB Secure Digital SD HC Memory Card (SDSDB-4096, BULK, No Reader)

    list price: $19.99 -- our price: $2.38
    (price subject to change: see help)
    Asin: B000P1O73A
    Manufacturer: SanDisk
    US | Canada | United Kingdom | Germany | France | Japan

    Editorial Review

    e SD High Capacity (SDHC) 4GB flash card is SanDisk's newest format and capacity SD card. SanDisk cards give you plenty of room to capture and store all your precious photos, safely and securely. Fast, and built to last, you can count on SanDisk cards to be ready when you are, every day. Store high quality photos, videos, music and more with this high storage capacity (4 GB) and super, Class 2, speed performance.Not all devices support SDHC 4.0GB cards. Please contact your device manufacturer for details. To ensure compatibility, look for the SDHC Logo on the product or packaging of your new camera or digital camcorder. ... Read more

    Reviews

    5-0 out of 5 stars Beware, March 8, 2008
    This is a must for loading music to listen to on my Palm TX. But BEWARE of eek Technoligies and buying at this price. They wanted $13.20 for shipping a 2 oz memory card? Buy from someone else even if it is a few dollars more and pay reasonable shipping rates. Don't be fooled by their cheap price they make it up 2x in shippoing charges. When I saw it I cancelled my order..

    4-0 out of 5 stars Make sure you can read it., December 24, 2007
    Standard SD and SDHC cards look identical in size and shape, only SDHC-compatible products will be able to accept the new SDHC cards. SanDisk differentiates its new cards with the new SDHC logo on the card and retail package.

    Now my web research finds that at the time of its release Wes Brewer, vice president of consumer product marketing at SanDisk, said, "In order to provide the easiest and most compatible solution for 4GB and larger capacity SDHC cards in the market, SanDisk chose to bundle its new MicroMate USB 2.0 SD/SDHC compatible card reader, which normally retails for $19.99, with this new card."

    Note this deal does not include a reader.

    In my case the device I bought it for can read it. Without the dedicated reader my year old HP computer cannot .

    3-0 out of 5 stars expensive SHIPPING!, March 23, 2008
    I played around with the prices on this and found out several things. If I order this item, $11 in shipping costs is added by the third party supplier! If I get the 2G version, even two of them, those qualify for free shipping from Amazon and come out much cheaper. So check your prices on these before ordering. My hunch is that you can probably pick this 4G up cheaper at your local electronics/computer store...

    2-0 out of 5 stars Beware! does not work in many cameras, September 5, 2008
    Finding that this product does not work in my one year old Canon camera I contacted the company and was given a list of cameras which do support it. This list belongs on the product description at the Amazon site. Besides the nuisance, I'll be out the $4.50 shipping cost for shipping an item requiring .59 cents postage.

    1-0 out of 5 stars Worked fine until it didn't work, December 15, 2008
    I purchased this card five months ago and used it without incident. I was happy with the amount of space on the card. Suddenly today, for no apparent reason, a message came up saying "memory card error". I cannot access the photos on my card with my external card reader. I cannot use the card in my camera. The photos on the card are lost, and that makes me quite sad.

    1-0 out of 5 stars NOT compatible with Canon Powershot 590IS, September 9, 2008
    The Sandisk site says this disk is compatible, and the user manual for the Canon Powershot 590IS says the camera can use SD or SDHC memory cards, so I assumed this card would be compatible. It wasn't. The camera says "memory card locked!" even when the card is unlocked. I'm giving this a one star rating because everything I looked at says this card is compatible, but it wasn't. For the Sandisk compatiblity site (which, of course, recommends their most expensive 32 and 16G cards first), see http://www.sandisk.com/Compatibility/Device(8725)-Canon-PowerShot_A590_IS.aspx . I haven't found a site so far that specifically recommends one card over another for this model of camera.

    5-0 out of 5 stars Love it!, May 6, 2008
    I love it, it works as promised, and holds well over 30 minutes of video. Pops in and out of camera easily. It's a great product and worth the extra money over the 2.0 GB one.

    Two thumbs up!

    5-0 out of 5 stars Works fine, October 29, 2007
    Bought for a new camera and works fine. Many older SD card units won't handle 4GB and larger cards so make sure that yours will. If you are buying this for a PC there are USB adapters for these larger cards.

    5-0 out of 5 stars Great, April 3, 2008
    This is a great addition to a digital camera if you shoot video clips.
    Just make sure that the digital camera supports SD cards over 2Gb. You can usually be confident it will work if the device is labeled SD HC compliant (SD HC is the 4-32Gb standard). It may work in other devices (my Kodak camera is not labeled for SD HC but the card works.)

    4-0 out of 5 stars Never been disappointed, March 26, 2008
    I've bought a bunch of these. Always worked well. Don't know about the 8mb cards, but the 4mb cards are a dream. Read more


    8. Kingston 4 GB Class 4 SDHC Flash Memory Card SD4/4GBET
    Electronics
    list price: $26.99 -- our price: $6.88
    (price subject to change: see help)
    Asin: B00200K1SO
    Manufacturer: Kingston Digital
    Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars
    US | Canada | United Kingdom | Germany | France | Japan

    Editorial Review

    Performance and capacity redefined with Kingston's SD High-Capacity memory cards.

    Starting at 4GB, SDHC cards offer larger-volume data storage and optimized recording performance with support for FAT 32 file formats. In addition, Kingstonâ?TMs SDHC cards use new speed "class" ratings known as Class 2, 4 and 6 that deliver a minimum data transfer rate for optimum performance with SDHC devices.

    Although identical in size to todays standard SD card, the new SDHC cards are designed differently and are only recognized by SDHC host devices. To ensure compatibility, look for the SDHC logo on cards and host devices (cameras, camcorders, etc.).

    For added reliability and durability, our solid-state SDHC memory cards are built of nonvolatile memory components and have no moving parts that could wear out or break. All cards are 100-percent tested and are backed by a lifetime warranty and free live technical support.
    ... Read more

    Reviews

    5-0 out of 5 stars Kingston quality, massive storage, what's not to love?, December 2, 2008
    There are some things to consider before buying this particular card or any other 32gb SDHC card on the market:

    1. This is NOT an ideal card for a digital SLR like a D80, D90, Rebel XT, etc... That is because it is a class 4 device. The class of a SDHC cards has to do with how fast they read and write files, not how much storage they have. For a digital SLR, you should purchase a class 6 SDHC card most of the time. Class 6 cards will allow you to take 'bursts' of photos and not be limited by the card's capacity to write them. Also class 4 cards are slower reading data, meaning they will take longer to upload files to your computer. Upload speed is convenient, especially when loading large batches of files.

    2. This card has far more storage than most people will need for their digital camera. Unless you like to keep all your photos on a SDHC card and never move them to your computer, or are a high volume photographer, there is very little need for more than about 8gb of storage space for most caeras. The possible exception to this is if you have a professional SLR that shoots files in the 16-20mb range--but if you do, you'll likely want a class 6 card anyway. If all you intend to use this card for is a digital camera, save yourself a lot of money and buy a PNY 8GB SDHC Card. If you're worried about running out of space on a vacation, buy a few of them. Otherwise you run the risk of having 'all your eggs in one basket.' If one card fails, you lose all your pictures instead of only a portion of them.

    This card is fantastic for use in a video camcorder capable of writing to an SDHC card. (Check with the manual first to insure that a class 4 card will be fast enough first). It is also perfect as extra storage for an ultra portable computer or net book like the Asus EEE pc. Another great application would be as added storage to a personal media player or MP3 player equipped with a SDHC slot such as the Cowon D2.

    There are other good 32gb SDHC cards on the market, some at cheaper price points than the Kingston card. IMHO, brand matters very little with something like a SDHC card, since they all are made pretty much the same way. None of the brands currently offering them (Transcend, PNY, Kingston) have high fail rates with their other products, so I believe they are all pretty similar. What you decide to buy will depend on whether you trust a particular brand, or who has the lowest price. All of them will work equally well.

    5-0 out of 5 stars Very Big, September 8, 2008
    PREFACE:

    I bought this card for extra disk space on my Asus EeePC netbook. I needed as much space as possible to supplement the very small SSD hard drive. I needed something with large capacity and relatively fast file transfer time.

    PROS:

    It shares the largest SD capacity on the market today with few others (Panasonic, Sandisk, and PNY) and is a quality name that I have had a good history with in the past. Its file transfer time is similar to the SSD drive in my machine so it basically acts as a second SSD for me at less than a quarter of the price!

    CONS:

    Its not the cheapest 32gb SD card(PNY) nor the fastest(Panasonic) but its good quality with a decent transfer rate.

    CONCLUSION:

    I'm very happy with its performance and capacity. I would like to see the price come down a bit, but that's the price of getting electronics of this caliber.

    That's my input, take it or leave it :)

    4-0 out of 5 stars Good for the money, but don't expect fast speeds., December 8, 2007
    Excellent for the price. I give it a 4/5 because it performs slower than expected from a C4 SDHC card. I also have a Sandisk EIII 2GB. Although it doesn't have the class ratings because it's not SDHC, the Sandisk outperforms the Kingston in both read/write.

    My test scenario: Using a Nikon D80 taking 6 shots continuously. The Kingston took considerably longer to write contents from the Nikon D80 buffer.

    If you're looking for a high speed card in a similar scenario, then look elsewhere. However, if you want a good card and no particular need for speed, then I recommend getting.

    2-0 out of 5 stars does the job, but not good enough..., December 23, 2009
    I have this card. This is extremely fast card. I did a test on my laptop sd slot writing 6 gb files onto the card. Average speed was 5mb per second. that was more than it rated for.

    5-0 out of 5 stars If it was a little faster..., January 19, 2008
    I contemplated a 4 star rating, but when you buy the card, you know that it is a "class 4" card, which means it's supposed to transfer files at at least 4GB/s. If it's crucial and you can afford it, you could get the "class 6" card, which would make a difference when transferring large amounts of data.

    In short:
    *Pros:*
    - Capacity. You can get more capacity, but this is a bout the best size/price ratio.
    - Price. Again, 8GB and 4GB cards have the best size/price ratio.
    *Cons:*
    - SDHC. This is not really a con if you have new equipment, but SDHC is a newer standard, so you have to make sure you have the right equipment - SDHC IS NOT THE SAME AS SD!!
    - Speed. It's not "slow", but if you've had fast cards you'll notice the difference. Of course, you know this from the "Class 4" rating, so it's also not really a con.

    I've owned 2 Kingston SD cards. The oldest of them is about 3 years old and is still as reliable and good as when I first got it, so I have reason to believe this card will last for a while.

    My older Kingston 50X SD card is about twice as fast as this card, but it's only 1GB, so I needed more GB's to capture more video. This card would be just about perfect if it was faster. When I say that, I don't mean that the card is slow - my Vista machine can use it for ReadyBoost and camera performance is good. Just know that ReadyBoost can only use 4GB of memory, so you'll have 4GB of memory just sitting unused if you use it for this purpose.

    Primarily, I use this card for recording video clips and pictures with my Canon cameras, SD800IS and A710IS. For that purpose the card is great. I haven't noticed any lag when taking 7.1 Mega-pixel pictures (which range from 1MB to about 4MBs) or full screen VGA video (640x480). Here's some general advice for these cameras in particular, but it applies to most cameras:
    1. Don't record more than about 10 minutes of video at a time because the file size goes over 1GB, but this depends on the camera and video format, not the card itself.
    2. You might want to get an external card reader, if you don't have an internal card reader. You'll be fine transferring files directly from the camera if you only take a few snapshots and short videos. But if you plan on truly using all 8GB and transferring them at once, do yourself a favor and get a card reader. Most cameras are not meant to read/transfer files at fast speeds (even if they're USB 2.0 capable), and at least with the SD800IS, I could not transfer files over 500MB. Once I used a memory card reader, transferring was a breeze.

    Although reading times are fast enough (between 4-8MB/s), writing is a bit slower - it tops out at about 4MB/s, which is good enough for the "Class 4" rating and fast enough to capture pictures without (noticeable) lag in my cameras.
    It's a great card for the price; just make sure you understand what you're buying.

    5-0 out of 5 stars Don't be swayed by idiot customers.., February 25, 2008
    The Kingston 4gb SDHC memory card, like all other Kingston products, is an exceptional piece of equipment. I use it with my Canon SD1000 and I get nothing but blazing fast write times and no headaches. Make sure your device supports SDHC because if not, it will not work. This is a key reason why people are left "unsatisfied" by what they get, not because of the product, but because they did not do their homework.

    Buyers, you should really take note that, most reviews on any site about not only Kingston, but other great brands, is heavily altered by idiot customers leaving comments to attack the site that sold them the items. So don't quickly judge an product based on how many stars it has, because honestly, you cannot take that into consideration unless you have read every review posted.

    5-0 out of 5 stars great value at $22, December 3, 2007
    The price of the SD4/4GB card jumps around a lot here. It is a great value at $22. Not so hot at $40. Wait a while and it may go down again. Note that only newer SD devices can use the 4GB SDHC cards. Older cameras, etc. can only use regular SD cards up to 2GB. If you're not sure, check your owner's manual or contact your manufacturer. Also, older SD card readers will not work with SDHC cards, but SDHC card readers are available for about $10 on amazon.com

    1-0 out of 5 stars Unreliable - Disappearing Pictures, December 12, 2008
    I had this card in a Panasonic DMC-TZ5 camera for about a month, and in that time the card experienced a "read error" on three separate occasions that resulted in all the pictures currently on the card disappearing. I called Panasonic customer service and the first question they asked was what brand card I had. When I told them Kingston, they advised me to get a new card, as nearly everyone who complained about disappearing pictures (in any model camera) had a Kingston card. I'd much rather spend a little more money and actually have my pictures!

    5-0 out of 5 stars A great bargain, and didn't fill up after 1000 pics!, January 21, 2009
    I like our point and shoot camera to be low thought-low effort (big SD card, high capacity rechargeable battery, reliable point and shoot performance, etc.), and this 16 gig card coupled with our Canon SD770 has been a great combination. Almost 1000 pics on our vacation to Punta Cana, and the card wasn't filled (I could do the math, but I don't want to).

    The card has been reliable, worked fine in a card reader, and I'd make the purchase again. I can't believe this little card holds 1000's of times more information than information storage from only a short time ago, and cost me ~$20. Amazing!

    5-0 out of 5 stars Kingston quality, massive storage, what's not to love?, December 2, 2008
    There are some things to consider before buying this particular card or any other 32gb SDHC card on the market:

    1. This is NOT an ideal card for a digital SLR like a D80, D90, Rebel XT, etc... That is because it is a class 4 device. The class of a SDHC cards has to do with how fast they read and write files, not how much storage they have. For a digital SLR, you should purchase a class 6 SDHC card most of the time. Class 6 cards will allow you to take 'bursts' of photos and not be limited by the card's capacity to write them. Also class 4 cards are slower reading data, meaning they will take longer to upload files to your computer. Upload speed is convenient, especially when loading large batches of files.

    2. This card has far more storage than most people will need for their digital camera. Unless you like to keep all your photos on a SDHC card and never move them to your computer, or are a high volume photographer, there is very little need for more than about 8gb of storage space for most caeras. The possible exception to this is if you have a professional SLR that shoots files in the 16-20mb range--but if you do, you'll likely want a class 6 card anyway. If all you intend to use this card for is a digital camera, save yourself a lot of money and buy a PNY 8GB SDHC Card. If you're worried about running out of space on a vacation, buy a few of them. Otherwise you run the risk of having 'all your eggs in one basket.' If one card fails, you lose all your pictures instead of only a portion of them.

    This card is fantastic for use in a video camcorder capable of writing to an SDHC card. (Check with the manual first to insure that a class 4 card will be fast enough first). It is also perfect as extra storage for an ultra portable computer or net book like the Asus EEE pc. Another great application would be as added storage to a personal media player or MP3 player equipped with a SDHC slot such as the Cowon D2.

    There are other good 32gb SDHC cards on the market, some at cheaper price points than the Kingston card. IMHO, brand matters very little with something like a SDHC card, since they all are made pretty much the same way. None of the brands currently offering them (Transcend, PNY, Kingston) have high fail rates with their other products, so I believe they are all pretty similar. What you decide to buy will depend on whether you trust a particular brand, or who has the lowest price. All of them will work equally well.

    5-0 out of 5 stars Very Big, September 8, 2008
    PREFACE:

    I bought this card for extra disk space on my Asus EeePC netbook. I needed as much space as possible to supplement the very small SSD hard drive. I needed something with large capacity and relatively fast file transfer time.

    PROS:

    It shares the largest SD capacity on the market today with few others (Panasonic, Sandisk, and PNY) and is a quality name that I have had a good history with in the past. Its file transfer time is similar to the SSD drive in my machine so it basically acts as a second SSD for me at less than a quarter of the price!

    CONS:

    Its not the cheapest 32gb SD card(PNY) nor the fastest(Panasonic) but its good quality with a decent transfer rate.

    CONCLUSION:

    I'm very happy with its performance and capacity. I would like to see the price come down a bit, but that's the price of getting electronics of this caliber.

    That's my input, take it or leave it :)

    4-0 out of 5 stars Good for the money, but don't expect fast speeds., December 8, 2007
    Excellent for the price. I give it a 4/5 because it performs slower than expected from a C4 SDHC card. I also have a Sandisk EIII 2GB. Although it doesn't have the class ratings because it's not SDHC, the Sandisk outperforms the Kingston in both read/write.

    My test scenario: Using a Nikon D80 taking 6 shots continuously. The Kingston took considerably longer to write contents from the Nikon D80 buffer.

    If you're looking for a high speed card in a similar scenario, then look elsewhere. However, if you want a good card and no particular need for speed, then I recommend getting.

    2-0 out of 5 stars does the job, but not good enough..., December 23, 2009
    I didnt realize how fast the point and shoot cameras are getting sooo many megapixels until I started looking for a good one for my mom... This card is no good for a 12 megapixel camera! It takes way too long to save each picture slowing down how fast you're able to take consecutive pictures! Go for the Sandisk extreme cards and dont look back!

    I only have SLR cameras, and use the San Disk extreme cards because speed is crucial! Dont cheap out on a card after buying a nice camera, or you'll be sorry! Thats the first thing i noticed when showing her how to use her new Canon Point and Shoot camera is how SLOWWWWWWWW it took to save each photo before I could take another.. If waiting a few seconds between each picture is a non-issue, buy all means save some money and buy this card.

    Bottom line: You're wasting your money buying this card to use in a high resolution point and shoot, which they all seem to be now days. Just too slow!

    5-0 out of 5 stars Fast Card, November 21, 2007
    I have this card. This is extremely fast card. I did a test on my laptop sd slot writing 6 gb files onto the card. Average speed was 5mb per second. that was more than it rated for.

    5-0 out of 5 stars If it was a little faster..., January 19, 2008
    I contemplated a 4 star rating, but when you buy the card, you know that it is a "class 4" card, which means it's supposed to transfer files at at least 4GB/s. If it's crucial and you can afford it, you could get the "class 6" card, which would make a difference when transferring large amounts of data.

    In short:
    *Pros:*
    - Capacity. You can get more capacity, but this is a bout the best size/price ratio.
    - Price. Again, 8GB and 4GB cards have the best size/price ratio.
    *Cons:*
    - SDHC. This is not really a con if you have new equipment, but SDHC is a newer standard, so you have to make sure you have the right equipment - SDHC IS NOT THE SAME AS SD!!
    - Speed. It's not "slow", but if you've had fast cards you'll notice the difference. Of course, you know this from the "Class 4" rating, so it's also not really a con.

    I've owned 2 Kingston SD cards. The oldest of them is about 3 years old and is still as reliable and good as when I first got it, so I have reason to believe this card will last for a while.

    My older Kingston 50X SD card is about twice as fast as this card, but it's only 1GB, so I needed more GB's to capture more video. This card would be just about perfect if it was faster. When I say that, I don't mean that the card is slow - my Vista machine can use it for ReadyBoost and camera performance is good. Just know that ReadyBoost can only use 4GB of memory, so you'll have 4GB of memory just sitting unused if you use it for this purpose.

    Primarily, I use this card for recording video clips and pictures with my Canon cameras, SD800IS and A710IS. For that purpose the card is great. I haven't noticed any lag when taking 7.1 Mega-pixel pictures (which range from 1MB to about 4MBs) or full screen VGA video (640x480). Here's some general advice for these cameras in particular, but it applies to most cameras:
    1. Don't record more than about 10 minutes of video at a time because the file size goes over 1GB, but this depends on the camera and video format, not the card itself.
    2. You might want to get an external card reader, if you don't have an internal card reader. You'll be fine transferring files directly from the camera if you only take a few snapshots and short videos. But if you plan on truly using all 8GB and transferring them at once, do yourself a favor and get a card reader. Most cameras are not meant to read/transfer files at fast speeds (even if they're USB 2.0 capable), and at least with the SD800IS, I could not transfer files over 500MB. Once I used a memory card reader, transferring was a breeze.

    Although reading times are fast enough (between 4-8MB/s), writing is a bit slower - it tops out at about 4MB/s, which is good enough for the "Class 4" rating and fast enough to capture pictures without (noticeable) lag in my cameras.
    It's a great card for the price; just make sure you understand what you're buying.

    5-0 out of 5 stars Don't be swayed by idiot customers.., February 25, 2008
    The Kingston 4gb SDHC memory card, like all other Kingston products, is an exceptional piece of equipment. I use it with my Canon SD1000 and I get nothing but blazing fast write times and no headaches. Make sure your device supports SDHC because if not, it will not work. This is a key reason why people are left "unsatisfied" by what they get, not because of the product, but because they did not do their homework.

    Buyers, you should really take note that, most reviews on any site about not only Kingston, but other great brands, is heavily altered by idiot customers leaving comments to attack the site that sold them the items. So don't quickly judge an product based on how many stars it has, because honestly, you cannot take that into consideration unless you have read every review posted.

    5-0 out of 5 stars great value at $22, December 3, 2007
    The price of the SD4/4GB card jumps around a lot here. It is a great value at $22. Not so hot at $40. Wait a while and it may go down again. Note that only newer SD devices can use the 4GB SDHC cards. Older cameras, etc. can only use regular SD cards up to 2GB. If you're not sure, check your owner's manual or contact your manufacturer. Also, older SD card readers will not work with SDHC cards, but SDHC card readers are available for about $10 on amazon.com

    1-0 out of 5 stars Unreliable - Disappearing Pictures, December 12, 2008
    I had this card in a Panasonic DMC-TZ5 camera for about a month, and in that time the card experienced a "read error" on three separate occasions that resulted in all the pictures currently on the card disappearing. I called Panasonic customer service and the first question they asked was what brand card I had. When I told them Kingston, they advised me to get a new card, as nearly everyone who complained about disappearing pictures (in any model camera) had a Kingston card. I'd much rather spend a little more money and actually have my pictures!

    5-0 out of 5 stars A great bargain, and didn't fill up after 1000 pics!, January 21, 2009
    I like our point and shoot camera to be low thought-low effort (big SD card, high capacity rechargeable battery, reliable point and shoot performance, etc.), and this 16 gig card coupled with our Canon SD770 has been a great combination. Almost 1000 pics on our vacation to Punta Cana, and the card wasn't filled (I could do the math, but I don't want to).

    The card has been reliable, worked fine in a card reader, and I'd make the purchase again. I can't believe this little card holds 1000's of times more information than information storage from only a short time ago, and cost me ~$20. Amazing! Read more


    9. Kingston 4 GB Class 4 SDHC Flash Memory Card SD4/4GB
    Electronics
    list price: $26.99 -- our price: $6.88
    (price subject to change: see help)
    Asin: B000MX48VM
    Manufacturer: Kingston Digital
    Average Customer Review: 4.3 out of 5 stars
    US | Canada | United Kingdom | Germany | France | Japan

    Editorial Review

    4GB SDHC Class 4 Flash Card ... Read more

    Reviews

    5-0 out of 5 stars Kingston quality, massive storage, what's not to love?, December 2, 2008
    There are some things to consider before buying this particular card or any other 32gb SDHC card on the market:

    1. This is NOT an ideal card for a digital SLR like a D80, D90, Rebel XT, etc... That is because it is a class 4 device. The class of a SDHC cards has to do with how fast they read and write files, not how much storage they have. For a digital SLR, you should purchase a class 6 SDHC card most of the time. Class 6 cards will allow you to take 'bursts' of photos and not be limited by the card's capacity to write them. Also class 4 cards are slower reading data, meaning they will take longer to upload files to your computer. Upload speed is convenient, especially when loading large batches of files.

    2. This card has far more storage than most people will need for their digital camera. Unless you like to keep all your photos on a SDHC card and never move them to your computer, or are a high volume photographer, there is very little need for more than about 8gb of storage space for most caeras. The possible exception to this is if you have a professional SLR that shoots files in the 16-20mb range--but if you do, you'll likely want a class 6 card anyway. If all you intend to use this card for is a digital camera, save yourself a lot of money and buy a PNY 8GB SDHC Card. If you're worried about running out of space on a vacation, buy a few of them. Otherwise you run the risk of having 'all your eggs in one basket.' If one card fails, you lose all your pictures instead of only a portion of them.

    This card is fantastic for use in a video camcorder capable of writing to an SDHC card. (Check with the manual first to insure that a class 4 card will be fast enough first). It is also perfect as extra storage for an ultra portable computer or net book like the Asus EEE pc. Another great application would be as added storage to a personal media player or MP3 player equipped with a SDHC slot such as the Cowon D2.

    There are other good 32gb SDHC cards on the market, some at cheaper price points than the Kingston card. IMHO, brand matters very little with something like a SDHC card, since they all are made pretty much the same way. None of the brands currently offering them (Transcend, PNY, Kingston) have high fail rates with their other products, so I believe they are all pretty similar. What you decide to buy will depend on whether you trust a particular brand, or who has the lowest price. All of them will work equally well.

    5-0 out of 5 stars Very Big, September 8, 2008
    PREFACE:

    I bought this card for extra disk space on my Asus EeePC netbook. I needed as much space as possible to supplement the very small SSD hard drive. I needed something with large capacity and relatively fast file transfer time.

    PROS:

    It shares the largest SD capacity on the market today with few others (Panasonic, Sandisk, and PNY) and is a quality name that I have had a good history with in the past. Its file transfer time is similar to the SSD drive in my machine so it basically acts as a second SSD for me at less than a quarter of the price!

    CONS:

    Its not the cheapest 32gb SD card(PNY) nor the fastest(Panasonic) but its good quality with a decent transfer rate.

    CONCLUSION:

    I'm very happy with its performance and capacity. I would like to see the price come down a bit, but that's the price of getting electronics of this caliber.

    That's my input, take it or leave it :)

    4-0 out of 5 stars Good for the money, but don't expect fast speeds., December 8, 2007
    I didnt realize how fast the point and shoot cameras are getting sooo many megapixels until I started looking for a good one for my mom... This card is no good for a 12 megapixel camera! It takes way too long to save each picture slowing down how fast you're able to take consecutive pictures! Go for the Sandisk extreme cards and dont look back!

    I only have SLR cameras, and use the San Disk extreme cards because speed is crucial! Dont cheap out on a card after buying a nice camera, or you'll be sorry! Thats the first thing i noticed when showing her how to use her new Canon Point and Shoot camera is how SLOWWWWWWWW it took to save each photo before I could take another.. If waiting a few seconds between each picture is a non-issue, buy all means save some money and buy this card.

    Bottom line: You're wasting your money buying this card to use in a high resolution point and shoot, which they all seem to be now days. Just too slow!

    5-0 out of 5 stars Fast Card, November 21, 2007
    I have this card. This is extremely fast card. I did a test on my laptop sd slot writing 6 gb files onto the card. Average speed was 5mb per second. that was more than it rated for.

    5-0 out of 5 stars If it was a little faster..., January 19, 2008
    I contemplated a 4 star rating, but when you buy the card, you know that it is a "class 4" card, which means it's supposed to transfer files at at least 4GB/s. If it's crucial and you can afford it, you could get the "class 6" card, which would make a difference when transferring large amounts of data.

    In short:
    *Pros:*
    - Capacity. You can get more capacity, but this is a bout the best size/price ratio.
    - Price. Again, 8GB and 4GB cards have the best size/price ratio.
    *Cons:*
    - SDHC. This is not really a con if you have new equipment, but SDHC is a newer standard, so you have to make sure you have the right equipment - SDHC IS NOT THE SAME AS SD!!
    - Speed. It's not "slow", but if you've had fast cards you'll notice the difference. Of course, you know this from the "Class 4" rating, so it's also not really a con.

    I've owned 2 Kingston SD cards. The oldest of them is about 3 years old and is still as reliable and good as when I first got it, so I have reason to believe this card will last for a while.

    My older Kingston 50X SD card is about twice as fast as this card, but it's only 1GB, so I needed more GB's to capture more video. This card would be just about perfect if it was faster. When I say that, I don't mean that the card is slow - my Vista machine can use it for ReadyBoost and camera performance is good. Just know that ReadyBoost can only use 4GB of memory, so you'll have 4GB of memory just sitting unused if you use it for this purpose.

    Primarily, I use this card for recording video clips and pictures with my Canon cameras, SD800IS and A710IS. For that purpose the card is great. I haven't noticed any lag when taking 7.1 Mega-pixel pictures (which range from 1MB to about 4MBs) or full screen VGA video (640x480). Here's some general advice for these cameras in particular, but it applies to most cameras:
    1. Don't record more than about 10 minutes of video at a time because the file size goes over 1GB, but this depends on the camera and video format, not the card itself.
    2. You might want to get an external card reader, if you don't have an internal card reader. You'll be fine transferring files directly from the camera if you only take a few snapshots and short videos. But if you plan on truly using all 8GB and transferring them at once, do yourself a favor and get a card reader. Most cameras are not meant to read/transfer files at fast speeds (even if they're USB 2.0 capable), and at least with the SD800IS, I could not transfer files over 500MB. Once I used a memory card reader, transferring was a breeze.

    Although reading times are fast enough (between 4-8MB/s), writing is a bit slower - it tops out at about 4MB/s, which is good enough for the "Class 4" rating and fast enough to capture pictures without (noticeable) lag in my cameras.
    It's a great card for the price; just make sure you understand what you're buying.

    5-0 out of 5 stars Don't be swayed by idiot customers.., February 25, 2008
    I like our point and shoot camera to be low thought-low effort (big SD card, high capacity rechargeable battery, reliable point and shoot performance, etc.), and this 16 gig card coupled with our Canon SD770 has been a great combination. Almost 1000 pics on our vacation to Punta Cana, and the card wasn't filled (I could do the math, but I don't want to).

    The card has been reliable, worked fine in a card reader, and I'd make the purchase again. I can't believe this little card holds 1000's of times more information than information storage from only a short time ago, and cost me ~$20. Amazing!

    5-0 out of 5 stars Kingston quality, massive storage, what's not to love?, December 2, 2008
    There are some things to consider before buying this particular card or any other 32gb SDHC card on the market:

    1. This is NOT an ideal card for a digital SLR like a D80, D90, Rebel XT, etc... That is because it is a class 4 device. The class of a SDHC cards has to do with how fast they read and write files, not how much storage they have. For a digital SLR, you should purchase a class 6 SDHC card most of the time. Class 6 cards will allow you to take 'bursts' of photos and not be limited by the card's capacity to write them. Also class 4 cards are slower reading data, meaning they will take longer to upload files to your computer. Upload speed is convenient, especially when loading large batches of files.

    2. This card has far more storage than most people will need for their digital camera. Unless you like to keep all your photos on a SDHC card and never move them to your computer, or are a high volume photographer, there is very little need for more than about 8gb of storage space for most caeras. The possible exception to this is if you have a professional SLR that shoots files in the 16-20mb range--but if you do, you'll likely want a class 6 card anyway. If all you intend to use this card for is a digital camera, save yourself a lot of money and buy a PNY 8GB SDHC Card. If you're worried about running out of space on a vacation, buy a few of them. Otherwise you run the risk of having 'all your eggs in one basket.' If one card fails, you lose all your pictures instead of only a portion of them.

    This card is fantastic for use in a video camcorder capable of writing to an SDHC card. (Check with the manual first to insure that a class 4 card will be fast enough first). It is also perfect as extra storage for an ultra portable computer or net book like the Asus EEE pc. Another great application would be as added storage to a personal media player or MP3 player equipped with a SDHC slot such as the Cowon D2.

    There are other good 32gb SDHC cards on the market, some at cheaper price points than the Kingston card. IMHO, brand matters very little with something like a SDHC card, since they all are made pretty much the same way. None of the brands currently offering them (Transcend, PNY, Kingston) have high fail rates with their other products, so I believe they are all pretty similar. What you decide to buy will depend on whether you trust a particular brand, or who has the lowest price. All of them will work equally well.

    5-0 out of 5 stars Very Big, September 8, 2008
    PREFACE:

    I bought this card for extra disk space on my Asus EeePC netbook. I needed as much space as possible to supplement the very small SSD hard drive. I needed something with large capacity and relatively fast file transfer time.

    PROS:

    It shares the largest SD capacity on the market today with few others (Panasonic, Sandisk, and PNY) and is a quality name that I have had a good history with in the past. Its file transfer time is similar to the SSD drive in my machine so it basically acts as a second SSD for me at less than a quarter of the price!

    CONS:

    Its not the cheapest 32gb SD card(PNY) nor the fastest(Panasonic) but its good quality with a decent transfer rate.

    CONCLUSION:

    I'm very happy with its performance and capacity. I would like to see the price come down a bit, but that's the price of getting electronics of this caliber.

    That's my input, take it or leave it :)

    4-0 out of 5 stars Good for the money, but don't expect fast speeds., December 8, 2007
    Excellent for the price. I give it a 4/5 because it performs slower than expected from a C4 SDHC card. I also have a Sandisk EIII 2GB. Although it doesn't have the class ratings because it's not SDHC, the Sandisk outperforms the Kingston in both read/write.

    My test scenario: Using a Nikon D80 taking 6 shots continuously. The Kingston took considerably longer to write contents from the Nikon D80 buffer.

    If you're looking for a high speed card in a similar scenario, then look elsewhere. However, if you want a good card and no particular need for speed, then I recommend getting.

    2-0 out of 5 stars does the job, but not good enough..., December 23, 2009
    I didnt realize how fast the point and shoot cameras are getting sooo many megapixels until I started looking for a good one for my mom... This card is no good for a 12 megapixel camera! It takes way too long to save each picture slowing down how fast you're able to take consecutive pictures! Go for the Sandisk extreme cards and dont look back!

    I only have SLR cameras, and use the San Disk extreme cards because speed is crucial! Dont cheap out on a card after buying a nice camera, or you'll be sorry! Thats the first thing i noticed when showing her how to use her new Canon Point and Shoot camera is how SLOWWWWWWWW it took to save each photo before I could take another.. If waiting a few seconds between each picture is a non-issue, buy all means save some money and buy this card.

    Bottom line: You're wasting your money buying this card to use in a high resolution point and shoot, which they all seem to be now days. Just too slow!

    5-0 out of 5 stars Fast Card, November 21, 2007
    I have this card. This is extremely fast card. I did a test on my laptop sd slot writing 6 gb files onto the card. Average speed was 5mb per second. that was more than it rated for.

    5-0 out of 5 stars If it was a little faster..., January 19, 2008
    I contemplated a 4 star rating, but when you buy the card, you know that it is a "class 4" card, which means it's supposed to transfer files at at least 4GB/s. If it's crucial and you can afford it, you could get the "class 6" card, which would make a difference when transferring large amounts of data.

    In short:
    *Pros:*
    - Capacity. You can get more capacity, but this is a bout the best size/price ratio.
    - Price. Again, 8GB and 4GB cards have the best size/price ratio.
    *Cons:*
    - SDHC. This is not really a con if you have new equipment, but SDHC is a newer standard, so you have to make sure you have the right equipment - SDHC IS NOT THE SAME AS SD!!
    - Speed. It's not "slow", but if you've had fast cards you'll notice the difference. Of course, you know this from the "Class 4" rating, so it's also not really a con.

    I've owned 2 Kingston SD cards. The oldest of them is about 3 years old and is still as reliable and good as when I first got it, so I have reason to believe this card will last for a while.

    My older Kingston 50X SD card is about twice as fast as this card, but it's only 1GB, so I needed more GB's to capture more video. This card would be just about perfect if it was faster. When I say that, I don't mean that the card is slow - my Vista machine can use it for ReadyBoost and camera performance is good. Just know that ReadyBoost can only use 4GB of memory, so you'll have 4GB of memory just sitting unused if you use it for this purpose.

    Primarily, I use this card for recording video clips and pictures with my Canon cameras, SD800IS and A710IS. For that purpose the card is great. I haven't noticed any lag when taking 7.1 Mega-pixel pictures (which range from 1MB to about 4MBs) or full screen VGA video (640x480). Here's some general advice for these cameras in particular, but it applies to most cameras:
    1. Don't record more than about 10 minutes of video at a time because the file size goes over 1GB, but this depends on the camera and video format, not the card itself.
    2. You might want to get an external card reader, if you don't have an internal card reader. You'll be fine transferring files directly from the camera if you only take a few snapshots and short videos. But if you plan on truly using all 8GB and transferring them at once, do yourself a favor and get a card reader. Most cameras are not meant to read/transfer files at fast speeds (even if they're USB 2.0 capable), and at least with the SD800IS, I could not transfer files over 500MB. Once I used a memory card reader, transferring was a breeze.

    Although reading times are fast enough (between 4-8MB/s), writing is a bit slower - it tops out at about 4MB/s, which is good enough for the "Class 4" rating and fast enough to capture pictures without (noticeable) lag in my cameras.
    It's a great card for the price; just make sure you understand what you're buying.

    5-0 out of 5 stars Don't be swayed by idiot customers.., February 25, 2008
    The Kingston 4gb SDHC memory card, like all other Kingston products, is an exceptional piece of equipment. I use it with my Canon SD1000 and I get nothing but blazing fast write times and no headaches. Make sure your device supports SDHC because if not, it will not work. This is a key reason why people are left "unsatisfied" by what they get, not because of the product, but because they did not do their homework.

    Buyers, you should really take note that, most reviews on any site about not only Kingston, but other great brands, is heavily altered by idiot customers leaving comments to attack the site that sold them the items. So don't quickly judge an product based on how many stars it has, because honestly, you cannot take that into consideration unless you have read every review posted.

    5-0 out of 5 stars great value at $22, December 3, 2007
    The price of the SD4/4GB card jumps around a lot here. It is a great value at $22. Not so hot at $40. Wait a while and it may go down again. Note that only newer SD devices can use the 4GB SDHC cards. Older cameras, etc. can only use regular SD cards up to 2GB. If you're not sure, check your owner's manual or contact your manufacturer. Also, older SD card readers will not work with SDHC cards, but SDHC card readers are available for about $10 on amazon.com

    1-0 out of 5 stars Unreliable - Disappearing Pictures, December 12, 2008
    I had this card in a Panasonic DMC-TZ5 camera for about a month, and in that time the card experienced a "read error" on three separate occasions that resulted in all the pictures currently on the card disappearing. I called Panasonic customer service and the first question they asked was what brand card I had. When I told them Kingston, they advised me to get a new card, as nearly everyone who complained about disappearing pictures (in any model camera) had a Kingston card. I'd much rather spend a little more money and actually have my pictures!

    5-0 out of 5 stars A great bargain, and didn't fill up after 1000 pics!, January 21, 2009
    I like our point and shoot camera to be low thought-low effort (big SD card, high capacity rechargeable battery, reliable point and shoot performance, etc.), and this 16 gig card coupled with our Canon SD770 has been a great combination. Almost 1000 pics on our vacation to Punta Cana, and the card wasn't filled (I could do the math, but I don't want to).

    The card has been reliable, worked fine in a card reader, and I'd make the purchase again. I can't believe this little card holds 1000's of times more information than information storage from only a short time ago, and cost me ~$20. Amazing! Read more


    10. 3 Pack of Premium Crystal Clear Screen Protectors for Apple iPad
    Electronics
    list price: $19.95 -- our price: $0.01
    (price subject to change: see help)
    Asin: B003D8GAA0
    Manufacturer: ChiTek
    Average Customer Review: 4.4 out of 5 stars
    US | Canada | United Kingdom | Germany | France | Japan

    Editorial Review

    3 Pack of Premium Crystal Clear Screen Protector for Apple iPad ... Read more

    Reviews

    4-0 out of 5 stars Now I know why there are three in the pack, April 3, 2010
    As an iTouch owner, I had used a clear screen protector with generally good results, although there were a very few bubbles that weren't really a distraction once the device was in use.

    I had pre-ordered an iPad on the first day that they became available to order and knew that with the much larger screen, I would definitely need a screen protector.

    My iPad arrived today (April 3rd) and I immediately attempted to install one of the three "Premium Crystal Clear Screen Protectors" as son as I removed the iPad from its box.

    The method of installation was basically the same as for the iTouch screen protector that I had previously used. First you peel off one side of the backing with a tab. You then place the screen onto the iPad screen, trying to do so without leaving a lot of bubbles. I tried as best I could to align the screen hole over the iPad button and then slowly applied the rest of the screen moving from bottom to top. Unfortunately after applying the screen and then removing the outside of the clear screen with the other tab, I was left with a LOT of bubbles.

    Hoping to do better I repeated the process using the second of the supplied screens. My efforts the second time were a bit better in terms of a smaller amount of bubbles, but then I noticed a piece of yellow lint that had been left by the supplied yellow cleaning cloth that I had used to wipe the iPad screen. When I tried to remove the lint with the cloth and replaced the clear screen back onto the iPad screen, there was a noticeable smudge.

    I was now down to the last of the three supplied screens and repeated the process again except this time I discovered that when applying the clear screen to the iPad screen DIAGONALLY starting from the bottom and moving toward the top, you can do so leaving almost no bubbles at all. You will also need to be make certain that the sides of the clear screen and the iPad screen are aligned exactly or you will be left with a long bubble down most of one side.

    After going through all of this trial and error, I was finally able to have a clear screen in acceptable condition with only a few bubbles. I only hope that readers of this review will learn from my own initial difficulties and not have to use all three of the supplied screens before arriving at a satisfactory result.

    4-0 out of 5 stars There are 3 pieces and you just don't see it., April 10, 2010
    This product works great once you figure out how it works.

    At first glance it looks like 2 pieces stuck together that you have to pull apart.
    It then appears that you should apply the thin one to your iPad. wrong.

    The thicker side still has an invisible piece stuck to it.

    You apply the thicker piece smoothly over your ipad and then squeeze out the few bubbles you see.
    rub the whole face now to get the invisible layer to stick.

    You then Peel Off the thick piece and you will see that another layer is present on your iPad.

    This would have been nice to include as instructions but no instructions came with the product.
    I would say that is pretty rude considering you cannot even see the piece that will be used.

    So I bought the pack of 3 and got my last one to work. I figured it out on #2, #3 was perfect.

    5-0 out of 5 stars Perfect protector once installion is done properly, May 10, 2010
    I've read most of the reviews for this product and it seems like the complaints revolve around installation. I too went through two before setting the last one down perfectly with virtually no bubbles. Start at the top and make sure the paper tab lettering is facing the iPad. Pull slowly from underneath and you will see that it lays is self down virtually with no bubbles. I just purchased a second set so I have them ready for when I damage the one I just installed.

    4-0 out of 5 stars How to Apply and Get 99% Bubble Free Results, July 7, 2010
    I've applied this type of screen protector in the past (on my iPod Touch, Nintendo DS / DSi, and my PSP). Using the tips below, I was able to apply this LCD screen protector 99% bubble free. I was actually pleasantly surprised I was able to do this since it was by far the largest screen protector I've ever applied.

    The instructions that come with the package are not very helpful. Below are mine. Hope they help.

    INSTRUCTIONS / TIPS
    ========

    1) CLEAN the surface of your iPad. Use a microfiber cloth and even use a compressed air can if you want to be sure. Position yourself or a light so that you would be able to see ANY specs. Any leftover specs will raise the screen protector and will give you a bubble that you CANNOT remove. Keep the iPad's screen OFF so you have a better chance of seeing any specks.

    2) First remove the plastic envelope/pouch that directly contains the screen protector.

    3) Without removing and of the backing, place the screen protector with the hole over the iPad's circle button. Now you know exactly how much leeway you will have.
    Also make sure that the circle is popped out of the screen protector.

    4) Find something flexible and semi-rigid to push away the air bubbles. You WILL be getting air bubbles as you apply the screen protector. The trick will be to remove them as you apply the screen protector. With smaller screen protectors, I've used credit cards. But in this case, the screen is bigger. I've found that the plastic Staples cards you get in the mail (the ones that the size of postcards) are very helpful for this task. Your second choice may be a credit card or the very thin, plastic window of a cheap picture frame. Whatever you use, make sure it has a sizable straight edge and no sharp corners (You don't want to puncture the screen protector).

    6) Peel away a corner of the backing (The side labeled #1). Don't peel the whole backing off. You'll need to touch the backing in order to reposition the screen protector if necessary.

    7) Continue to peel the backing but keep it minimal. You want just enough so that you can position the hole over the circle button. If you don't get it the 1st time, remove from the iPad's surface as little as possible and try again. Be careful to avoid getting any dust on the iPad's screen at this time. This is why it's good to keep as much backing on as possible.

    8) After you have adequately centered the hole around the circle button, begin to slowly peel the Side 1 Backing while you use your flexible card to push away any air bubbles. Push the bubbles to the EDGE of the screen protector. If there are bubbles that are difficult to get rid of and if you're certain that's it just a bubble and not caused by specks, then you can gently remove as much backing as needed from the iPad's screen and try again. TAKE YOUR TIME.

    9) Hopefully you've managed to attach the screen protector with minimal bubbles. Continue to push away as many bubbles as possible.

    10) Now you need to peel of Side 2 Backing. But since the screen protector is already attached to your iPad screen, you will need to be VERY careful and slow. It's possible that the quick removal of Side 2 Backing can lift the screen protector off of the iPad screen and cause air bubbles. If there are air bubbles, use the flexible card to push away any air bubbles.

    That's it, you're done. Sit back and treat yourself to a new app.

    CONCLUSION
    ==========
    I liked the fact that it includes 3 screen protectors. I was able to succeed with my first one but it's nice to know that there are backups.

    I didn't like the minimal instructions with the package (and the Engrish spellings). This item is very cheap. If it were more expensive, I would expect to get a flexible plastic card for getting rid of the air bubbles.

    The screen protector itself has a slightly oily residue. When your iPad is off, you can see it. The residue is not visible when the iPad is turned on.

    1-0 out of 5 stars Not worth the few dollars I spent! Don't Buy This Screen Cover!, June 14, 2010
    I spent a lot of time reading reviews before I bought this screen cover, so I knew it was difficult to place. The truth is that getting this to line up perfectly and have zero air bubbles and zero lint (especially with the cloth they provide) is about the same as winning big in Vegas. It can happen, but it most likely won't. I have had an iPhone since the first model and have purchased the new models each release and have placed screen protectors on all of them - pretty much the same process on a smaller screen. So I have some experience at placing these little clear covers. I burned through all 3 of these screen protectors, NEVER getting a perfect placement, no air bubbles and no lint. I could have lived with the first 2 small imperfections, but a tiny hair lint, which shows up massively on a white background, such as when you are checking or reading mail, is akin to seeing a great movie on a theater screen with that little tear right in the middle of the action.

    Secondly, I played with the last one before taking it off due to the above mentioned issues and the feel and responsiveness of the pad changes. Things were slightly less responsive and, as another reviewer mentioned, fingerprints on the screen protector were nightmarish compared to the actual screen. I bought the $599.00 version and did not spend that kind of money on a visual, interactive touch device, to have the screen less than perfect and slower to respond. I will wait till apple or another vendor actual produces something that is worth buying to protect the screen. In the meantime, I purchased the Hard Candy case with the shield cover for transport.

    5-0 out of 5 stars Awesome!, June 12, 2010
    I read the reviews and saw that folks had trouble getting it to work on the first try. So I ordered 6. I got it to work on the first try. If you follow the advice of the the previous reviewers you will be fine. The thicker piece on top makes it a breeze to lay down. I had no bubbles after the first try. Just make sure there is no lint on the screen. I had a very small piece On one of the corners but you can barely see it. I swear, when you are laying this thing down it's amazing. It goes down so smooth.
    I did have help. One person held it in place. One person used a card to insure no bubbles. I pulled the 1st cover off. I slipped it out from under the bottom starting at the top where the tab is located. When you slip it out you have to hold the whole thing really close to the screen or it will come back up. When you are laying it down you will be amazed that very few, if any, bubbles appear. The few that do are easily handled by the person with the credit card (to smooth out bubbles). I was very worried about getting this to work. I've had so much trouble with cell phones in the past. But the thick card on top is the trick. It wants to lay down smooth. Just use three people. A holder, a peeler, and a bubble handler. Don't forget to take the temporary thick piece off the top after smoothing out the bubbles. This thing is so awesome, I just can't understand why they don't send instructions.

    3-0 out of 5 stars You get what you pay for...., May 3, 2010
    For it's very cheap price, you get what you pay for.

    I had no problems applying the screen protector. It just needs alot of patience. Before you start anything, make sure you are in a lint free environment (which is impossible). Using the cloth included, wipe the screen clean. You will notice that any finger prints or skin oil residue come right off. That is the special coating Apple uses on all their touch devices. First, I peeled off the number one layer. Yes, there are tabs with numbers to peel of the right layer which makes me wonder why other reviewers would confuse the protective film from the actual screen protector. The instuctions tell you specifically to remove tab 1 first. Some people would keep tab 1 on and start applying the sceen protector but, I figured that peeling off the tab 1 after would cause some air bubbles to appear.

    Next, I dry fitted the screen protector with tab 2 side down. The hole was a tight fit with the edge of the screen protector right on the lip of the metal lip of the iPad. Hold the screen protector in place. Then, I peeled just the corner of tab 2 back to apply the screen protector. This takes some skill as I removed the corner with a little movement as possible. Still holding the screen protector in place, I made contact with the iPad and slowly peeled away tab 2 film. Still going diagonally and still going very slowly, I use the cloth to wipe the screen protector and applying pressure to the contact area. If an air bubble forms as you are putting it down, gently lift the specific area and re-apply. Air bubbles will usually form if you are placing on too fast. If a random lint gets under, take the plastic cover it came with or tab 1 film and use the corner to take it away. If you cleaned the screen properly, you would only have lint appear at the sides which get drawn to the application process because of the static electricity generated by the cleaning cloth and the separation of the film and screen protector.

    With alot of patience, you will have the screen protector on lint and bubble free. I was able to do it on one try. I did have one lint that got away but it was way on the side and could not been seen when the iPad case was put on. NOTE: the iPad case is a very tight fit and probably should not be used with this screen protector. I used the iPad case and it caused a bubble to form on one side (not very noticable). This was caused by the case pushing against the screen protector edge. This cannot be avoided. It is the tight fit of the iPad case that will cause this.

    On another note, you will notice that after use, there will some skin oil residue or finger prints. When wiping with the cloth, the residue will not clean as easily as it did when you cleaned the iPad screen before you applied the screen protector. Again, the iPad has a special coating that makes it easier to clean. I used the screen protector to prevent any scratches. Good luck.

    5-0 out of 5 stars Very pleased. Remember the extra top film!, June 28, 2010
    When I first installed it, I neglected to follow the final step in the directions. The result was cloudy, checkerboard looking, and just plain awful. It looked like it had scratched and streaked from the squeegee too. I thought I had wasted my money.

    There is a top layer of protective film that you are supposed to remove after install.

    Once that film is removed, the result is a very clear screen protector that I am very pleased with.

    It's a bit grippy at first (as are all screen protectors) but a few days use or a buff with a microfiber cloth and it feels great.

    Use a pair of latex gloves when you install and you can reposition and touch both sides as needed without screwing it up.

    I am very very pleased -- once I noticed the second protective film layer.

    1-0 out of 5 stars Useless, June 1, 2010
    After a bit of effort, I managed to get the screen lined up properly and put on my ipad with few bubbles.

    But I found it useless. I use my ipad as an eBook reader, and I found the quality of the display severely degraded (and unusable for reading books) after putting on the protective screen. I took it off after 5 minutes and am currently using nothing. I'm still looking for a usable protective screen.

    1-0 out of 5 stars Don't buy it, July 10, 2010
    Forget the application or worrying about bubbles...once it's applied it totally destroys the crystal clear image the iPad produces. I put it on, took it right off and threw it in the trash. JUNK! Read more


    11. Roku XDS Streaming Player 1080p
    Electronics
    list price: $99.99 -- our price: $99.99
    (price subject to change: see help)
    Asin: B00426C57O
    Manufacturer: Roku, Inc.
    Sales Rank: 17
    Average Customer Review: 4.6 out of 5 stars
    US | Canada | United Kingdom | Germany | France | Japan

    Editorial Review

    Roku is a little box that allows you to instantly stream tons of entertainment on your TV. Watch over 100,000 movies and TV shows from Netflix, Amazon Video On Demand, and more. Listen to music on Pandora, or listen to your own iTunes playlists. Even watch major sports, news, or original Internet programming. It's all available whenever you want it. The all-new, top-of-the-line Roku XDS sets a new standard with 1080p streaming video, the latest wireless technology, and Instant Replay. All for under $100. No wonder Roku is the best selling streaming player ever. ... Read more

    Reviews

    5-0 out of 5 stars Every once in a while, a truly impressive device comes along.
    Like a lot of people who use Amazon, I own all kinds of electronic gear. Every once in a while, you get your hands on a device that really stands out in terms of ease of use and performance. When I first hooked up my Slingbox, for example, I realized that it was unique and was going to add something truly useful and impressive to my audio-video set-up. When I read a description of the Roku box, I had a similar expectation. Could it be as easy to use as advertised? Would it perform on a level that would really satisfy? Would it be one of those "stand out" devices? Now I can say in all honesty that the Roku player is everything I hoped and more. When the description says you will be up and running in just a few minutes, you can believe it. I opened the box, plugged in the power cord, attached a cable to my high speed router, and ran audio to my amp. I turned everything on and immediately saw the set-up screen for the Roku player. To run a quick test, I tried streaming a video from Netflix--it worked perfectly. This initial set-up and test took no more than 10 minutes. After several days of using the Roku, I have yet to have even the slightest problem. I have added a couple dozen channels and all work as expected. My only moment of hesitation came when I saw how small the Roku player is. It is tiny sitting there with all the other components, but when I saw what it could do, the size became inconsequential. The Roku player truly is an impressive device. While not necessarily a replacement, the Roku XDS Streaming Player is another serious alternative to cable TV. By the way, for those traveling outside the USA, where Netflix does not allow the streaming of movies on your PC, there is a way to connect the Roku player to your Slingbox. You then have access to Netflix through the Roku wherever you have an internet connection.

    5-0 out of 5 stars Cable Killer? For my family YES!!
    I have been looking for an alternative to cable/satellite for awhile. The ROKU XDS is the closest thing to it. With the support of Netflix streaming(some episodes even in HD), and with Hulu plus coming in the fall, the ROKU XDS is all my family needs. Also, if you look at the ROKU forums, developers are creating other private and premium channels. This is something that Apple.tv cannot do. They also mention on their website that with an update in November you will be able to play video off USB. Setup took only minutes and the picture in awesome on my 1080P LCD. The only draw back would be if you watch a lot of sports, currently they only have MLB.tv. As soon as Hulu Plus is added I will be dropping my $90/month satellite bill and pay $20 a month for Hulu and Netflix.

    5-0 out of 5 stars ### COMPONENT CABLE USERS, Info ~ ROKU Rules NOW it plays your MP3 MUSIC & .MP4 VIDEOS! & .JPG
    No need to comment about the NETFLX features of this new version ROKU XDS it is SUPERB as always...
    ..................................................
    [] ### COMPONENT CABLE USERS (Red/Green/Blue RCA to 3.5mm male jack) info:

    *** F.Y.I. ## COMPONENT CABLE Users (Red/Green/Blue RCA to 3.5mm male jack): You will require a Special COMPONENT CABLE to use the Roku XDS on your TV. In case the Roku website says "OUT OF STOCK" for this cable, you CAN BUY THIS CABLE through Amazon, which WILL WORK for you to connect the Roku XDS to your TV:
    ##> Media Player Component Cable <##

    * You will need to use the 'Composite Cable' -- Red/White/Yellow RCA connector cable -- to enable AUDIO to your TV. Using the Red/White as needed ONLY for AUDIO from the Roku XDS to your TV's input RCA jacks.

    * NOTE: an HDMI cable carries Both AUDIO and VIDEO in the one single HDMI cable.
    * NOTE: Quoting From Roku's Support Site: "PLEASE NOTE: To take advantage of HD content available on Roku, you must use either HDMI or component."
    ..................................................

    *** F.Y.I. for you WIRELESS Users: I am using this TRENDnet 300 Mbps Wireless router, and it is working perfectly with my Roku XDS setup [Excellent range, NO dropped signals, GREAT!]:
    TRENDnet 300 Mbps Wireless N Gigabit Router TEW-639GR (Black)

    ..................................................

    Here's what I am doing with the new ROKU XDS:

    [] I bought from Amazon, this Hard Drive enclosure:
    Eagle Tech ET-CS2PSU2-BK 2.5-Inch SATA to USB Portable HDD Enclosure w/Built-in USB cable
    ** Notes about this Hard Drive enclosure:
    # Fits 2.5-Inch SATA hard drive up to 500GB and connects to USB 2.0
    # Enclosure measures 5.4 x 3.2 x 0.44 Inches

    [] I added the following WD 250gb 7200rpm 2.5" Hard Drive:
    Western Digital 250 GB Scorpio Black SATA 7200 RPM 16 MB Cache Bulk/OEM Notebook Hard Drive WD2500BEKT

    Using your computer/laptop you will want to create on the external Hard drive. three FOLDERS:

    VIDEO
    MUSIC
    PHOTOS
    Now from your computer, you add your mp3's to the Hardrive folder called "MUSIC" etc... you get the idea.
    USB Media Browser will display these FOLDERS on screen in your Roku XDS
    NOW I am converting all my videos to .MP4 format and loading them onto the WD Hard drive in the enclosure. Adding .MP3 Audio files is working great also. You can also view .JPG photo files...

    Plug the Hard drive Enclosure into the USB Jack on the side of the ROKU XDS and turn on the ROKU and your TV. [ You may need to add the "Private Channel" for the "USB MEDIA BROWSER" as a 'Private Channel' for your ROKU XDS first]

    [see below instructions to ADD PRIVATE CHANNEL to your Roku XDS]:
    Channel code: KGULU
    ................................................................

    #### HOW TO ADD ROKU PRIVATE CHANNEL - to your Roku XDS - "USB MEDIA BROWSER" ####

    Here's what you will need to do to learn MORE about the file formats that are supported using the "USB Media Browser" that you added by doing the following:
    USB Media Browser allows you to access content via the USB port on your Roku XR & Roku XDS.

    * If you haven't already, login to your online Roku Account owner(dot)roku(dot)com
    * On the "My Account" page, click the link labled "Add Private Channel"
    * You will be prompted to enter a code.
    * The code to install "USB Media Browser" is KGULU
    .......................................................................

    To learn more about what FILE FORMATS can be used by the "USB MEDIA BROWSER" do a Google search for the following (copy and paste the below line into search box):

    roku usb media browser forums file formats

    From what I am seeing on the Roku forums, I can't confirm this because I haven't tried these yet here is a list that the forums have said will work on the Roku "USB Media Browser":

    [VIDEO FILES[
    .mp4

    [AUDIO FORMATS]:
    .mp3
    .wma

    [IMAGE FORMATS]:
    .jpg
    .png
    .gif

    Read more on the Roku forums, there is more information there from users that are working with the "USB Media Browser."

    [] I am formatting my VIDEO files to .mp4 because the .MP4 video files will also work on my Ipod Classic, Sony DASH, and Sansa Fuze. ]

    To View your USB Media Browser:
    1) Turn on Roku XDS (and TV)
    2) Scroll over to the right with your remote, until you find the Yellow Icon titled "USB Media Browser" and click on it, and again... until you see the files on your external Hard Drive (or inserted USB Drive , which ever you are using for your file storage on the Roku XDS USB port.)

    Roku is always updating their menu, and features. Great way to get videos -- as well as Amazon video-on-demand, and more. Excellent Purchase!! 5 Star device.

    3-0 out of 5 stars Great features but wireless needs some work...
    I brought this for my mother because it will be simple for her to use. I especially liked the simple remote control which is not overwhelming. However the wireless connectivity was a little difficult and very finicky. The wireless router is located about 20 feet away, and we've never had any problem conencting with laptops or iPhones/iPods. However, I had to fidget with the placement of the Roku and attempted 2-3x before connecting finally. It then downloaded an update and after it rebooted, it lost the wireless connection again. So I fidgeted with the placement again until it connected. Then I tried to setup NetFlix and the wireless had dropped again, so I reconnected, got the activitation code and it validated the Roku box. Thankfully, you cannot turn the Roku off so hopefully once it's connected, it stays connected or tries to reconnect. I am hoping it was just the initial setup that was slightly flakey. To be on the safe side, I made sure the wireless router and the Roku had as few electronic obstacles around it. I am very impressed with the streaming technology and how the Roku is able to buffer the streaming so the movie is shown smoothly and crisply. It does look so much better than watching NetFlix on the PC or Wii. I also have Netflix on the PS3 and Xbox360 and I find the quality comparable. Another great feature is that the audio is turned on for BOTH HDMI and left/right audio cables so you can run the sound to the receiver and TV. Unfortunately, I ran out of optical inputs on the receiver but I'm assuming that toslink connection is always on as well. I have high hopes that my mother will be able to use the Roku, and once Netflix starts providing closed-captioning on the Roku, it will be even more useful! I am just concerned about the wireless connectivity but if it does prove to be a problem, my solution would be to run ethernet straight to the Roku or wire the electrical outlets with Netgear PowerLine equipment (they seem to provide very good results).

    5-0 out of 5 stars Great device. Here's some wireless setup help.
    OUT OF THE BOX;

    Comes with the basic unit, Composite cables (pretty useless), power supply, remote, a very minimal setup guide, and batteries for the remote.

    WIRELES SSETUP:

    Wired ethernet is also an option.
    1. There is some plastic film to peel off. Plug the unit in and connect your HDMI cable (or component cables) to your TV or HD AMP. Turn your TV and amp on and set the correct inputs. The unit will display the first screen on TV and immediately ask what kind of connection you would like. I used wireless, which I suspect will be most popular.

    2. Wireless networks in range with SSID broadcast on will be displayed. Choose your network and click Ok. The next screen has alphanumeric input to supply your network password if your router is set to WEP or WPA protection. If you have MAC filtering on, turn off your MAC filter or add the MAC device ID to your router. The ROKU's MAC is displayed if you seek help from a help menu button on the password screen.

    3. If the following sounds a bit complicated, it's not really. The setup proceedure will lead you through it well. The unit will connect and do a rather lengthy download of a "software" update. If this is successful, the home screen will be displayed with options of what service you want to link to the ROKU. If any step fails, back to the first setup screen. Thankfully it remembers your net password. You will also have to choose a display size configuration and resolution. The unit will then display a code to link to the ROKU site. You can ignore it or link to the ROKU site and choose your service from there. I picked 1080P HD, and chose Netflix directly from the ROKU menu. A new Netflix specific code will be displayed. Then I went to my computer to pull up the Netflix site, migrate to streaming access, pick the ROKU out of a menu of devices (it's "other") and input the Netflix code.

    4. Thats it! The ROKU will now be ready and will display a nice Netflix menu to choose what you want to stream and play. The Computer menu is a bit easier to browse when choosing a DVD or show to watch than the ROKU screen, but the latter is perfectly serviceable, especially if you know what you want to watch.

    Some caveats/suggestions/musings. When I started the setup routine, the device kept rebooting and loosing network connectivity. It was position. It is VERY sensitive to it's placement. Don't put it in between a large amp and a DVD player, or in a deep cabinet, say. Have it positioned out in the open. If you don't have a gigabit 802.11 "n" router, get one. There's lots of info downloading and streaming to this device through your router. Some reviews have criticized the ROKU's remote. I found it worked just fine. If you are wedded to the idea of streaming media, this device is great at present. But, there is an increasing selection of Blu- Ray DVD players with this capability already built in. They are much more expensive at this time, but prices will come down. If you are almost ready to upgrade to a Blu-Ray player, maybe good to wait a bit and pick one when prices fall in the near future.

    AFTER SETUP;

    Great. video quality and sound are terrific at 720p. 1080p and surround sound to probably come from Netflix next year, I hear. Wasn't disappointed at all. Terrific buy.

    5-0 out of 5 stars Initial Problems Overcome
    This is a great product. Not only can you get streaming Netflix - but so much more. Now that there are so many of makers of 'streaming boxes', just doing that singular act is not so miraculous anymore. Its how many other 'apps' that are available on the box that gives you that 'extra'. And ROKU is great about adding new apps all the time. And I like that there are so many options on how to connect the device to my tv. That allows me to move the ROKU box around in the house and attach it to other tvs - even my older tvs that only have red,white,yellow RCA connectors on the back of them. I can even take it on trips with me and attach it to 'whatever' tv, as long as wireless is available to me.

    When I got my new ROKU XDS I, like others that reported here, had some problems getting it to connect to my wireless network. So, I reported the problem to ROKU support and they provided me with the 'fix' (see below). Glad I waited for their response before sending it back.

    ***************THE FIX*****************************
    Kindly go through the following instructions.
    1.Turn off the Modem, Router, and the Roku player.
    2.Plug the Modem back in, give it some time to settle down.
    3.Plug the router back in and when ready, turn on the Roku player.
    If you have a cable modem, kindly unscrew the co-axial cable, wait for 30 seconds and then plug it back in.

    5-0 out of 5 stars Great little box
    This roku player is alot smaller than I expected which is a plus. It has an attractive sleek design. Super simple to set up. Sure you have to link up netflix and amazon video but alot of the "apps" are free items. This does not take long at all and once you have it done you don't have to do it again. So far it has streamed perfectly for several hours. I got this because the blu ray players I bought wouldn't stream correctly so I'm giving this a try since my extended family loves it. Really I'll probably just use it for amazon on demand and netflix. Who has time for all the other add ins? There is also a news channel where you can watch that mornings news or the previous night. Pretty neat.

    5-0 out of 5 stars Are you on the fence about what to buy?
    So picture this.... Here I am, paying over $110/month to a cable company for internet and cable. I have a thousand channels, but yet every night when I get home from work I struggle to find anything to watch..

    Then I discover Netflix streaming on my Wii. Well I was so enamoured that I decided to look into set-top boxes that could bring Netflix and more to my TV (the Wii remote is just a pain to use as a TV remote).

    I did some research, and came across the then upcoming Boxee Box. Well I just couldn't wait to try it out, but I didn't have a tv with an HDMI, so I kept looking and saw the Rokus support any tv hookup and if you have the tv its in 1080p too! (where available). So I bought the XDS. I was instantly impressed on how easy it was to set up. I had my Netflix, and all of a sudden I was choosing from a hundred different channels of content from Hulu + to live streaming 24 hour news out of Russia, France, and England. Needless to say I was impressed.

    Even though I was happy, I still really thought about getting the Boxee Box and returning the Roku because I had used the software on my PC and it was so slick, and with the addition of its browser I figured how could I go wrong? Well once that BB was released and it was lambasted in the reviews, I quickly realized the Roku was exactly the right choice!

    True there are its deficiencies, (no product is really going to be EVERYTHING) one of them being local playback. It doesn't support the breadth of codecs that others do, but pop in a thumb drive of videos in mp4 and you can watch personal files on your TV too! That's the extent of my local library so local playback isn't very important to me anyway. Other than that, all I know is for the price of Netflix and Hulu ($17 combined) I canceled BOTH my expensive cable and internet, plugged in an antenna for OTA local channels, and picked up a DSL package from my phone company for $20. So for $37/ month,down from $110, I have infinitely MORE to watch on my own schedule... Well I couldn't be happier. My only complaint is there is almost too much I want to watch!

    If you are looking to save some $$$ from those cable provider rip-off artists, actually want MORE for your money not LESS, and aren't really concerned about local playback, then my advice is to definately buy the Roku.

    5-0 out of 5 stars Absolutely amazed
    I ordered this from Amazon (pre-order) and received it only 2 days ago. Prior to this, I was streaming netflix via a WII disc. I got this little box, set it up (setup was a breeze on my wireless network) and started viewing netflix. Only after viewing thru Roku, I came to know how bad WII streaming is.

    Netflix quality is amazing even on my SD TV. We watched content for more than 12 hours and I haven't seen any inturruption. I have Wireless N router. I connected Roku to TV thru RED-WHITE-YELLOW cable. I'm planning for a HDTV with HDMI and looking forward to seeing 1080p netflix movies.

    Youtube rocks as well. You can search for songs, movies and start playing them instantly. If youtube clip is HD, it's beautifully rendered by Roku box.

    Overall, I'm completely satisfied with this little box. Hope it works well for next couple of years.

    -Sam.

    5-0 out of 5 stars Fantastic streaming internet device
    I bought this device for my father as he is somewhat technically challenged. He kept telling me that he wanted to watch Netflix on his 52" LCD television. He was under the impression that he had to buy a Blue Ray player to achieve a high quality streaming experience. I figured it would be nice to buy a Blue Ray player since he'd have the player for all the DVD's he owns and the Netflix streaming would be gravy. After pricing the BR players I realized that if I wanted WIFI built in, I'd have to buy an off brand unit to be at a comfortable price point. Further research revealed the Roku XDS which is a fantastic piece of tech. It is extremely easy to set up. From the time you open the package to the moment you're watching a movie streaming from Netflix is around 15 minutes. You could probably even do it faster, but I was tinkering with some of the other channels that Roku has to offer.

    Since WIFI connectivity was an extremely important feature, I quickly went to that screen in the setup sequence to make sure I had a good signal. Since my router is 10 feet from the Roku box my throughput is very high. I could have ran a cable to the ethernet connection but then we're talking more wires. I hate wires!!! I put in my WEP password and the box promptly started updating the firmware. In order to link your Netflix account the Roku will show you an alphanumeric code. You just go to [...]and input the code that appears on the screen. Within 15 seconds or so the Roku screen will advance and you are now fully integrated with Netflix. There is no need to do this again unless you reset the Roku back to factory settings. The same procedure is used for Pandora and other channels offered on the Roku.

    There are dozens of other channels that you can add to Roku. If you have an Amazon VOD account, it integrates just as easily as the Netflix account. Then you have the ability to add Hulu + as well but I don't recommend that. The cost is $7.99/month as of this writing and since you still have to watch ads, I don't see the value. Lastly, if you're on the fence about which Roku to purchase (there are three) you should consider the top of the line model or the second tiered unit. Do not consider the cheapest model because it lacks WIFI and will not transmit in HD.

    I happen to own the new generation of Apple TV (nearly same size as Roku). The reason I have the Apple unit is because of how it tightly integrates with iTunes and the iPhone 4 which I have. I can easily recommend the Roku player to anyone who wants to add a nice piece of tech to their multi-media systems. Best of luck and thanks for reading my review. Read more


    12. Western Digital WD Elements 2 TB USB 2.0 Desktop External Hard Drive WDBAAU0020HBK-NESN
    Electronics
    list price: $152.99 -- our price: $104.99
    (price subject to change: see help)
    Asin: B002QEBMCI
    Manufacturer: Western Digital
    US | Canada | United Kingdom | Germany | France | Japan

    Editorial Review

    2TB WD Elements USB 2.0 Ext desktop External Hard Drive ... Read more

    Reviews

    5-0 out of 5 stars Very good hard drive!, November 23, 2009
    I work for Computing support at Arizona State University, and I have enough technical knowledge to be certified as a TECH JUNKIE :).

    I am a photographer too, so I have tons of Photos (about 160GB), Videos, Software, Movies and Documentaries. I was looking for a simple external hard drive without any backup software included, I am smart enough to do manual incremental backups with file tree structure intact (I use GOODSYNC to backup, its very simple and easy to use and free).

    I have looked at many many external HDDs and narrowed down to two models "Samsung Story 1TB - very good one too" and this one (I wanted it to be cheap too - got this for $85 on [...]). I did not go with other WD models because of their annoying Backup Software.

    Coming to the WD Elements 1TB: Its much smaller than I expected. It is dead silent, I had to touch it to convince myself that it was running, when I first turned it on. Its not too heavy either. The indicator light is placed at the rear, which is a very good thing (I find these LED's annoying, especially at night).

    After I did the first setup, I copied 383GB of data (931GB was total space). It took about 4hr 47min, speed varied between 20MBps to 37MBps. This is pretty good speed for USB 2.0. It was just a bit warm (my old segate hard drive would be very very hot for this amount of data transfer).

    I would recommend it to beginners or pros alike. I am very happy with this purchase!


    UPDATE:

    After about three months of heavy usage, it never gave up on me. Its still dead silent and works flawlessly. It never got even warm!!

    Follow these steps to get GOODSYNC for FREE:

    In the beginning GOODSYNC was free, later they made a paid version as it gained popularity..

    but there is a way to get PRO version for free...

    1. go to good sync website
    2. signup for a trial offer and you get PRO serial for free (I signed up for eMusic trial)
    3. Once you get the serial, end the subscription before the trial expires...

    NOTE: The above mentioned procedure may not work anymore :(

    UPDATE: 07-28-2010

    I sold my WD Elements 1TB and got a 2TB one a couple of months ago(as my data is on rise all the time), couldn't be happier :)
    I bought it from TigerDirect for [ ... ] and got [ ... ] cashback via [ ... ] ...awesome!!

    5-0 out of 5 stars Excellent, well designed product for the money!, November 19, 2009
    I bought this on sale at Fry's for $99, way below the amazon price. I wanted something simple as most hard drives these days come with their annoying built in software which cannot be deleted (like WD Essential Edition). This is a hassle free drive and is not bundled with any of the extra software which is exactly what I wanted. You simply plug it in and it works. It can easily be formatted to work with macs as well. I've been using WD hard drives for years and I own several models of the "essential" and "passport" editions. They are very reliable.

    This elements hard drive has a sleek and sexy, minimalist design. It is well built overall and constructed of durable plastic. There is a slot for the USB cable, a slot for the power adapter and a tiny circular white light which blinks when it is in use (the light is not overwhelming as some hard drives can be). All three of these features are on one side/face of the hard drive (as shown in the picture), so if you have this plugged in and it is facing away from you, you won't see the light at all. This doesn't bother me but it may be a turn off for some people.

    When in operation, it is very smooth and quiet compared to other WD hard drives I own. This may be due to the fact that it is closed entirely and there are no holes for ventilation as in other WD models. But this doesn't bother me because I just use this as a backup and don't need it on all of the time. This could (emphasis on "could") be an issue if you are constantly using your hard drive because it may become hot. I haven't experienced this at all, just speculating. If you are just backing up files and, say, watching a movie on your computer which is stored on the hard drive, I think you'll be fine and there won't be any heating issues.

    More info here on WD's website: [...]

    5-0 out of 5 stars Good value, no extra junk software!, December 2, 2009
    I purchased the 1tb Elements (WDBAAU0010HBK-NESN) for use with a Dish DVR 622.

    Installation was was truly "plug and play". I simply took it out of the box, plugged it in, and it was immediately recognized by the DVR. I have since transferred about 200gb of content to/from it, and have watched content directly from the drive. So far, it is working perfectly. It automatically spins down after a few minutes of non-use, as well as when the DVR is powered off. It also spins back up automatically (less than 10 seconds) when the DVR accesses it.

    One thing some people might not like: The case is designed to sit flat (as pictured), not on its side. There are four small non-skid pads on the bottom corners, but none on either side. There is no indication on the box, in the documentation, or on Western Digital's web site as to whether the drive will work properly on edge. As a general rule, WD drives are designed to operate sideways or even upside down (any X,Y,Z orientation), so this one probably will too -- but you'll need to provide your own non-skid pads.

    Several similar Western Digital drives, such as the late model "My Book" series, now include a firmware-based CD-partition that is difficult to remove, and can cause compatibility issues with some devices. That partition contains backup software and utilities that are of questionable value in any case, and of absolutely no value when using the drive with a non-computer device (like the Dish DVR). The Elements -- at least at time of this review -- doesn't include any of that junk. (Note: WD does have a downloadable utility to remove the partition from the other drives, but if you don't want that junk then save yourself the time/trouble and just buy the Elements drive.)

    5-0 out of 5 stars Register the drive with Western Digital to get the warranty updated !, December 16, 2009
    I bought 3 of these drives for $99 each around Black Friday. The value cannot be beat and I always prefer Western Digital due to their Advance Replacement policy.
    One of the drives had issues. I always check all new drives I buy with the Western Digital Life Diagnostics program which is available for free from Western Digital. All drives passed the test without issues. The test will take at least 12 hours to complete on such a large drive. One of the drives was dropping the transfer rate after copying 500 GB to it for no reason and I had to replace it. What is really disappointing is that the drive passed the test so I have no confidence in the diagnostic program anymore.

    The moment you receive the drive check your warranty online at the Western Digital website. The warranty for this model is only 1 year which I consider absolutely insufficient for a drive. The bad thing about it is that Western Digital starts counting from the manufacturing date and by the time you get it, the warranty left is only 9-10 months which is ridiculous. They will update the warranty to 1 year after the purchase date but you will have to send them the receipt and be patient. It took them 2 weeks to respond to an online request. They also have an option to extend the warranty for another 2 years for $25 per drive. I might consider that....
    I recommend this drive because the size, price and ease of use. It doesn't have any of the limitations of the fancier Western Digital drives. It is just a big, cheap external hard drive.


    Update - September 16 2010

    Today I bought another one and when cheking the warranty it was shorter by 6 months. I went through my regular procedure to write to WD Customer support when I realized they had a link that was addressing the issue. Now you can register the drive and it will update the warranty automatically. It even gives you 1 month more ! Also, the registration page gives information about warranty upgrades. You can upgrade this drive from 1 year to 3 years for $25. Not bad considering that if it dies after the first year (and all do after they are out of warranty) it is just a paperweight.

    My advices to everybody that buy WD drives are:

    1. Check your warranty ASAP.
    2. Register the drive to get it updated.


    5-0 out of 5 stars Excellent External Drive, May 2, 2010
    This is a great external hard drive for expanding your digital storage capacity. I was in need for added storage and wanted to go for the 2TB WD Elements External Hard Drive. I wasn't really happy with the prices I was seeing for the 2TB hard drive, and that is when I decided to check up on the 1.5TB drives. WOW! I was amazed at the price Amazon was offering these drives and I got two of them. Yes, two! (My work requires that kind of storage space)
    I got 3TB worth of storage for the price of a 2TB External hard drive!

    That said, let us talk about the performance of these drives -

    1) Build and form factor - Nice sleek looking enclosures. All black, the sides are fingerprint magnets with a glossy finish. The top and bottom panels have a matte finish. Looks matter to me, even if it just an external drive. The microUSB and AC sockets are closely spaced with a small white indicator light besides them. All in all very compact, sleek, and aesthetically pleasing device.
    2) Performance - I am getting constantly good speeds on these drives. Reads at 30MB/s and writes at about 24MB/s, which is good and fast enough for my needs.

    As always, users have to be careful with all hard drives, internal or external. I am handling my drives with the utmost care. I don't want to lose any important data.

    Finally, this drive is a complete value for money purchase. I say go for it if you are out looking for a large capacity external hard drive.

    5-0 out of 5 stars Very nice drive for a low price, November 23, 2009
    I picked this up from Fry's when it was on sale for 100 bucks.
    I like the price.
    I think the main differentiators between this and the higher price drive is that it has only 1 year warranty, and does not come bundled with any software to help you back up stuff.
    But seriously who uses any of those anyways? Drive is preformated to NTFS, if you have a mac you'll need to reformat to be able write to it.
    what I like:
    very small.-for a 3.5" drive. very quiet and does not vibrate as much as my seagate 1.5TB drives.-This maybe due to the drive running at a lower RPM. I couldn't find the SPEC to say what this drive spins at.
    Drive spins up and down(powers down) when not in use. very nice. the white power LED isn't overly bright.
    dislike: enclosure snaps together, making it hard to swap out the drive in the future. only 1 year warranty. but I think that the 1 year is pre-built into the pricing.




    4-0 out of 5 stars So far so good.., November 29, 2009
    I was originally going to purchase the Western Digital WD Elements 1 TB USB 2.0 Desktop External Hard Drive (model WDE1UBK10000N). My sister in-law has that model and it truly is built like a tank. Metal case, rubber protectors on each end. It really looks like it could take few bumps. I picked up this particular model because I saw it on sale for $60 at the store that has a red bullseye for a logo. For that price I'd be silly not to snag it up.

    As others mentioned it has a plastic case which is ok. Metal would've been nicer. And it is completely silent. Other than seeing the white light in the back blinking when transferring files, I cannot tell that it is actually working. But it is working :). I transferred 149 gb of data from my old external drive to this one in about 3 hours. It's usb so I'm used to relatively slow transfers. The true test will be if it lasts as long as my iomega external hard drive which I've had for over 6 years. Even though it's old, it has a small fan, an on/off switch, a long power cord and it feels like it can take a bump. I just needed a back up in the event the old work horse died on me.

    Good:
    + cheap - $60 for "1TB" of storage space
    + plug and play
    + no annoying preloaded software
    + very quiet
    + barely warm after extended use(my old drive would get noticeably warm even with its built-in fan)

    Not so good:
    - plastic case. probably good idea not to lug this around too much.
    - edges are shiny and attracts finger prints (this really didn't matter to me, but I thought I'd mention it
    - short power cord ~6'4" (old drive's power cord is over 11'), though usb cord is a bit longer than my old drive (4'3" vs. 3'5"). It would've been better to add length on the power cord and shorten the usb.
    - no fan

    Price was the determining factor in choosing this drive over the "tank". If this can last as long as my old external hard drive then it will be $60 well spent.

    ***************************************************
    UPDATE (11/29/09):
    - actual storage space of 931 gb is a bit confusing at first. Per comments and some google searching 931gb is correct. Don't be alarmed when you first see the available space on your external hard drive.

    4-0 out of 5 stars Issues with Windows 7 Pro 64, June 2, 2010
    I'm very glad I purchased this drive. The hard drive is enclosed in a somewhat heavy but simple metal case, and Western Digital seems to take great pains with their retail packaging to minimize shock without using excessive packaging materials. They are using a GreenPower drive in there, so it remains quiet, cool, and merely sips energy. However, do not expect this to be a speed demon. It runs at the same speed as your average notebook drive, so filling up a large capacity drive such as this one may take a long time. The drive also comes with the benefit (to me) of having absolutely no useless backup software preinstalled. The only real complaint I have lies with the AC adapter. I generally prefer a plug with the adapter separate. This one comes with a "wall-wart" which takes up far too much space on a surge protector.

    I've had about 5 WD drives in the past, and of those 5 only one has failed me. All drives will eventually fail, and as such I see the company's ability to help you much more important than whether or not a particular drive fails. WD is one of those companies that is fairly reasonable when it comes to RMA and replacement of their products, so that's always a good sign.

    Full formatted size for a 1.5TB drive is 1.35TB (as expected). Before placing anything valuable into something this large, I run Windows error checking, the company's diagnostic program (in this case WD Data Lifeguard found on their website), use full drive encryption by TrueCrypt to avoid being paranoid if I need to send it back for warranty, and finally I transfer and delete roughly a third of the drive's capacity a few times to stress test it. I've found that if a drive is to ever fail within a reasonable amount of time, this regimen will kill it and save me the trouble of an RMA in the relatively near future.

    5-0 out of 5 stars Very good hard drive!, November 23, 2009
    I work for Computing support at Arizona State University, and I have enough technical knowledge to be certified as a TECH JUNKIE :).

    I am a photographer too, so I have tons of Photos (about 160GB), Videos, Software, Movies and Documentaries. I was looking for a simple external hard drive without any backup software included, I am smart enough to do manual incremental backups with file tree structure intact (I use GOODSYNC to backup, its very simple and easy to use and free).

    I have looked at many many external HDDs and narrowed down to two models "Samsung Story 1TB - very good one too" and this one (I wanted it to be cheap too - got this for $85 on [...]). I did not go with other WD models because of their annoying Backup Software.

    Coming to the WD Elements 1TB: Its much smaller than I expected. It is dead silent, I had to touch it to convince myself that it was running, when I first turned it on. Its not too heavy either. The indicator light is placed at the rear, which is a very good thing (I find these LED's annoying, especially at night).

    After I did the first setup, I copied 383GB of data (931GB was total space). It took about 4hr 47min, speed varied between 20MBps to 37MBps. This is pretty good speed for USB 2.0. It was just a bit warm (my old segate hard drive would be very very hot for this amount of data transfer).

    I would recommend it to beginners or pros alike. I am very happy with this purchase!


    UPDATE:

    After about three months of heavy usage, it never gave up on me. Its still dead silent and works flawlessly. It never got even warm!!

    Follow these steps to get GOODSYNC for FREE:

    In the beginning GOODSYNC was free, later they made a paid version as it gained popularity..

    but there is a way to get PRO version for free...

    1. go to good sync website
    2. signup for a trial offer and you get PRO serial for free (I signed up for eMusic trial)
    3. Once you get the serial, end the subscription before the trial expires...

    NOTE: The above mentioned procedure may not work anymore :(

    UPDATE: 07-28-2010

    I sold my WD Elements 1TB and got a 2TB one a couple of months ago(as my data is on rise all the time), couldn't be happier :)
    I bought it from TigerDirect for [ ... ] and got [ ... ] cashback via [ ... ] ...awesome!!

    5-0 out of 5 stars Excellent, well designed product for the money!, November 19, 2009
    I bought this on sale at Fry's for $99, way below the amazon price. I wanted something simple as most hard drives these days come with their annoying built in software which cannot be deleted (like WD Essential Edition). This is a hassle free drive and is not bundled with any of the extra software which is exactly what I wanted. You simply plug it in and it works. It can easily be formatted to work with macs as well. I've been using WD hard drives for years and I own several models of the "essential" and "passport" editions. They are very reliable.

    This elements hard drive has a sleek and sexy, minimalist design. It is well built overall and constructed of durable plastic. There is a slot for the USB cable, a slot for the power adapter and a tiny circular white light which blinks when it is in use (the light is not overwhelming as some hard drives can be). All three of these features are on one side/face of the hard drive (as shown in the picture), so if you have this plugged in and it is facing away from you, you won't see the light at all. This doesn't bother me but it may be a turn off for some people.

    When in operation, it is very smooth and quiet compared to other WD hard drives I own. This may be due to the fact that it is closed entirely and there are no holes for ventilation as in other WD models. But this doesn't bother me because I just use this as a backup and don't need it on all of the time. This could (emphasis on "could") be an issue if you are constantly using your hard drive because it may become hot. I haven't experienced this at all, just speculating. If you are just backing up files and, say, watching a movie on your computer which is stored on the hard drive, I think you'll be fine and there won't be any heating issues.

    More info here on WD's website: [...]

    5-0 out of 5 stars Good value, no extra junk software!, December 2, 2009
    I purchased the 1tb Elements (WDBAAU0010HBK-NESN) for use with a Dish DVR 622.

    Installation was was truly "plug and play". I simply took it out of the box, plugged it in, and it was immediately recognized by the DVR. I have since transferred about 200gb of content to/from it, and have watched content directly from the drive. So far, it is working perfectly. It automatically spins down after a few minutes of non-use, as well as when the DVR is powered off. It also spins back up automatically (less than 10 seconds) when the DVR accesses it.

    One thing some people might not like: The case is designed to sit flat (as pictured), not on its side. There are four small non-skid pads on the bottom corners, but none on either side. There is no indication on the box, in the documentation, or on Western Digital's web site as to whether the drive will work properly on edge. As a general rule, WD drives are designed to operate sideways or even upside down (any X,Y,Z orientation), so this one probably will too -- but you'll need to provide your own non-skid pads.

    Several similar Western Digital drives, such as the late model "My Book" series, now include a firmware-based CD-partition that is difficult to remove, and can cause compatibility issues with some devices. That partition contains backup software and utilities that are of questionable value in any case, and of absolutely no value when using the drive with a non-computer device (like the Dish DVR). The Elements -- at least at time of this review -- doesn't include any of that junk. (Note: WD does have a downloadable utility to remove the partition from the other drives, but if you don't want that junk then save yourself the time/trouble and just buy the Elements drive.)

    5-0 out of 5 stars Register the drive with Western Digital to get the warranty updated !, December 16, 2009
    I bought 3 of these drives for $99 each around Black Friday. The value cannot be beat and I always prefer Western Digital due to their Advance Replacement policy.
    One of the drives had issues. I always check all new drives I buy with the Western Digital Life Diagnostics program which is available for free from Western Digital. All drives passed the test without issues. The test will take at least 12 hours to complete on such a large drive. One of the drives was dropping the transfer rate after copying 500 GB to it for no reason and I had to replace it. What is really disappointing is that the drive passed the test so I have no confidence in the diagnostic program anymore.

    The moment you receive the drive check your warranty online at the Western Digital website. The warranty for this model is only 1 year which I consider absolutely insufficient for a drive. The bad thing about it is that Western Digital starts counting from the manufacturing date and by the time you get it, the warranty left is only 9-10 months which is ridiculous. They will update the warranty to 1 year after the purchase date but you will have to send them the receipt and be patient. It took them 2 weeks to respond to an online request. They also have an option to extend the warranty for another 2 years for $25 per drive. I might consider that....
    I recommend this drive because the size, price and ease of use. It doesn't have any of the limitations of the fancier Western Digital drives. It is just a big, cheap external hard drive.


    Update - September 16 2010

    Today I bought another one and when cheking the warranty it was shorter by 6 months. I went through my regular procedure to write to WD Customer support when I realized they had a link that was addressing the issue. Now you can register the drive and it will update the warranty automatically. It even gives you 1 month more ! Also, the registration page gives information about warranty upgrades. You can upgrade this drive from 1 year to 3 years for $25. Not bad considering that if it dies after the first year (and all do after they are out of warranty) it is just a paperweight.

    My advices to everybody that buy WD drives are:

    1. Check your warranty ASAP.
    2. Register the drive to get it updated.


    5-0 out of 5 stars Excellent External Drive, May 2, 2010
    The Western Digital WD Elements is probably most notable for what it doesn't have:

    1) It doesn't have any clever "look at me" flasing/glowing/blinking lights. One tiny light in the back will confirm it is on. But you won't need to check because "it just works".

    2) It doesn't have any annoying, auto-loading, "I know better" software. There are lots of great backup programs available (freeware, shareware and built into most operating systems). And, of course, you can always just drag-and-drop files right onto the drive.

    3) It doesn't get hot. Heat is a killer for electronics so that is even more important than you might think.

    4) It doesn't make ANY sound.

    5) It doesn't take up much space. It is smaller and more compact than any other external drive that I have purchased.

    6) It doen't have any goofy stands or attachments. It is squared on all sides except the back so you can position it any way you want to.

    7) And finally, it doesn't cost much. Considering drive space for cost this is the best value I have ever gotten on a drive.

    For reference I have purchased two Seagate Freeagent drives, a 1 TB MyBook and have put several old drives into external drive enclosures. All of them are still working. I also have passing experience with several others from work and associates -- I like the WD Elements solution the best!

    5-0 out of 5 stars Total value for money!, January 11, 2010
    This is a great external hard drive for expanding your digital storage capacity. I was in need for added storage and wanted to go for the 2TB WD Elements External Hard Drive. I wasn't really happy with the prices I was seeing for the 2TB hard drive, and that is when I decided to check up on the 1.5TB drives. WOW! I was amazed at the price Amazon was offering these drives and I got two of them. Yes, two! (My work requires that kind of storage space)
    I got 3TB worth of storage for the price of a 2TB External hard drive!

    That said, let us talk about the performance of these drives -

    1) Build and form factor - Nice sleek looking enclosures. All black, the sides are fingerprint magnets with a glossy finish. The top and bottom panels have a matte finish. Looks matter to me, even if it just an external drive. The microUSB and AC sockets are closely spaced with a small white indicator light besides them. All in all very compact, sleek, and aesthetically pleasing device.
    2) Performance - I am getting constantly good speeds on these drives. Reads at 30MB/s and writes at about 24MB/s, which is good and fast enough for my needs.

    As always, users have to be careful with all hard drives, internal or external. I am handling my drives with the utmost care. I don't want to lose any important data.

    Finally, this drive is a complete value for money purchase. I say go for it if you are out looking for a large capacity external hard drive.

    5-0 out of 5 stars Very nice drive for a low price, November 23, 2009
    I picked this up from Fry's when it was on sale for 100 bucks.
    I like the price.
    I think the main differentiators between this and the higher price drive is that it has only 1 year warranty, and does not come bundled with any software to help you back up stuff.
    But seriously who uses any of those anyways? Drive is preformated to NTFS, if you have a mac you'll need to reformat to be able write to it.
    what I like:
    very small.-for a 3.5" drive. very quiet and does not vibrate as much as my seagate 1.5TB drives.-This maybe due to the drive running at a lower RPM. I couldn't find the SPEC to say what this drive spins at.
    Drive spins up and down(powers down) when not in use. very nice. the white power LED isn't overly bright.
    dislike: enclosure snaps together, making it hard to swap out the drive in the future. only 1 year warranty. but I think that the 1 year is pre-built into the pricing.




    4-0 out of 5 stars So far so good.., November 29, 2009
    I was originally going to purchase the Western Digital WD Elements 1 TB USB 2.0 Desktop External Hard Drive (model WDE1UBK10000N). My sister in-law has that model and it truly is built like a tank. Metal case, rubber protectors on each end. It really looks like it could take few bumps. I picked up this particular model because I saw it on sale for $60 at the store that has a red bullseye for a logo. For that price I'd be silly not to snag it up.

    As others mentioned it has a plastic case which is ok. Metal would've been nicer. And it is completely silent. Other than seeing the white light in the back blinking when transferring files, I cannot tell that it is actually working. But it is working :). I transferred 149 gb of data from my old external drive to this one in about 3 hours. It's usb so I'm used to relatively slow transfers. The true test will be if it lasts as long as my iomega external hard drive which I've had for over 6 years. Even though it's old, it has a small fan, an on/off switch, a long power cord and it feels like it can take a bump. I just needed a back up in the event the old work horse died on me.

    Good:
    + cheap - $60 for "1TB" of storage space
    + plug and play
    + no annoying preloaded software
    + very quiet
    + barely warm after extended use(my old drive would get noticeably warm even with its built-in fan)

    Not so good:
    - plastic case. probably good idea not to lug this around too much.
    - edges are shiny and attracts finger prints (this really didn't matter to me, but I thought I'd mention it
    - short power cord ~6'4" (old drive's power cord is over 11'), though usb cord is a bit longer than my old drive (4'3" vs. 3'5"). It would've been better to add length on the power cord and shorten the usb.
    - no fan

    Price was the determining factor in choosing this drive over the "tank". If this can last as long as my old external hard drive then it will be $60 well spent.

    ***************************************************
    UPDATE (11/29/09):
    - actual storage space of 931 gb is a bit confusing at first. Per comments and some google searching 931gb is correct. Don't be alarmed when you first see the available space on your external hard drive.

    4-0 out of 5 stars Issues with Windows 7 Pro 64, June 2, 2010
    Just received mine and it works with my HP LapTop under XP but although the drive shows up in Windows 7 you can't do anything with it. No Drive letter, no format, no nothing - device is working properly - you just can't use it. When you attempt to assign a drive letter in Disk Manager it complains that it needs a refresh which doesn't help.

    After 5 or 6 Emails back and forth with WD they informed me to contact either my PC manufacturer or Microsoft to resolve the issue. After scouring the internet seems there are LOTS of people with this exact same problem under Windows 7 Pro 64 bit edition. (Most seem to have an NVidia video card as well.) Here's the fix (no thanks to WD):

    1. Open Device Manager
    2. Locate the Drive
    3. Right Click - Uninstall
    4. Unplug drive USB Cable and plug it back in

    Transfers files at around 28 MB/sec. Other than this start up issue so far it's made a great back up drive.

    5-0 out of 5 stars Very nice hard drive with no excess frills., April 15, 2010
    I'm very glad I purchased this drive. The hard drive is enclosed in a somewhat heavy but simple metal case, and Western Digital seems to take great pains with their retail packaging to minimize shock without using excessive packaging materials. They are using a GreenPower drive in there, so it remains quiet, cool, and merely sips energy. However, do not expect this to be a speed demon. It runs at the same speed as your average notebook drive, so filling up a large capacity drive such as this one may take a long time. The drive also comes with the benefit (to me) of having absolutely no useless backup software preinstalled. The only real complaint I have lies with the AC adapter. I generally prefer a plug with the adapter separate. This one comes with a "wall-wart" which takes up far too much space on a surge protector.

    I've had about 5 WD drives in the past, and of those 5 only one has failed me. All drives will eventually fail, and as such I see the company's ability to help you much more important than whether or not a particular drive fails. WD is one of those companies that is fairly reasonable when it comes to RMA and replacement of their products, so that's always a good sign.

    Full formatted size for a 1.5TB drive is 1.35TB (as expected). Before placing anything valuable into something this large, I run Windows error checking, the company's diagnostic program (in this case WD Data Lifeguard found on their website), use full drive encryption by TrueCrypt to avoid being paranoid if I need to send it back for warranty, and finally I transfer and delete roughly a third of the drive's capacity a few times to stress test it. I've found that if a drive is to ever fail within a reasonable amount of time, this regimen will kill it and save me the trouble of an RMA in the relatively near future. Read more


    13. 3 Pack of Universal Touch Screen Stylus Pen (Red + Black + Silver)
    Wireless Phone Accessory
    list price: $0.00 -- our price: $0.01
    (price subject to change: see help)
    Asin: B002BBJMO6
    Manufacturer: CCM
    Average Customer Review: 2.7 out of 5 stars
    US | Canada | United Kingdom | Germany | France | Japan

    Editorial Review

    Keep a PDA stylus on hand so you're always ready to jot a note or tap the touch screen without using your finger. ... Read more

    Reviews

    5-0 out of 5 stars Great for pointing, not for drawing, October 17, 2009
    These stylus are very well made and work very well, if all you want to do is find an alternative to pressing the onscreen keyboard. However, these stylus are totally useless for use with a drawing program because the rubber tip will not glide across the screen. If you use your iPhone outdoors and you are wearing gloves, these stylus are for you. If you want to draw, then you'd be better off with a stylus with a soft foam tip.

    5-0 out of 5 stars iTouch Stylus Pen, September 12, 2009
    For reaching those peskly small areas on your iPod Touch screen, the Universal Touch Screen Stylus Pen does the trick! They are comfortable in the hand and helps to make some of those tasks easier on the iPod Touch. If you have trouble with fingers that don't quite work the way you wish, then this is another reason to consider purchasing these pens.Silver Universal Touch Screen Stylus Pen for Apple Iphone 1st Gen, 3G 2nd Gen, Ipod Touch

    1-0 out of 5 stars Useless for your iPhone, October 20, 2009
    I should have read the reviews carefully.
    Do not buy this if you want to use it with your iPhone to draw, slide the screens or do anything cool.

    The tip is very soft and you need to put some effort in pressing it against the screen. If you try to slide it, you are in danger of damaging the screen since the tip moves away and the hard plastic of the stylus can scratch your precious sceeen.

    This is probably good if you are missing a finger or you are wearing gloves and your apps are in the main screen.

    5-0 out of 5 stars Very nice stylus but to thick for my case, August 24, 2009
    This is a very nice stylus with a soft rubber tip. They work great on my Instinct and with the rubber tip there is no fear of scratching the screen. My only "issue" is that the stylus are to thick to fit into the stylus pocket on the stock Instinct case... but the size does make the stylus much more easier to control so you're more accurate with them. I'm glad I ordered the three pack because I can just keep one at work, one in the car, and one at home.

    5-0 out of 5 stars Buy the correct stylus, September 12, 2010
    There are three (3) types of touch screens, buy the correct stylus for your screen.

    From eHow:

    Resistive-type screens lack the clarity of other touch screens but they tend to be very durable and can be used in a variety of environments. Resistive-type screens are the most common in use today.

    Capacitive screens are resistant to outside elements, making them very durable, and they still maintain a high clarity. Unlike resistive and surface wave screens, which can be used with stylus, capacitive panels must be touched with a finger.

    Surface wave touch panels are the more advanced of the three types, offering the highest clarity. But they are more easily damaged by outside elements.

    [...]
    The iPad has a capacitive touch screen, your gloves won't work, and that plastic stylus from your old Palm PDA won't work either. Buy a capacitive stylus for your iPad.


    5-0 out of 5 stars Iphone Stylus, January 31, 2010
    I bought this not sure would it work but it is great. The service I received was also great. I got product in a timely manner which is important to me.

    1-0 out of 5 stars Great price basically useless item, September 28, 2010
    The price and shipping time on this item are great. Sadly, the item itself is basically useless. I bought this for my iPad and it works but you have to mash really hard and then it leaves a funky streak mark and it's hard to get it to work and then it isn't very precise. I bought it to have a stylus to use with a drawing app and given how big the tip is and hard I have to mash to get it to work it's much less useful than simply using my finger.

    1-0 out of 5 stars yuck, July 7, 2010
    This is not a Pogo Sketch! It has a rubber tip on it that does not write as well as the pogo sketch!

    1-0 out of 5 stars stylus pens, February 7, 2010
    Would not recommend these to anyone. They don't work without a lot of pressure so if you are trying to play a game forget it. They only work for typing.

    5-0 out of 5 stars Touch Screen Stylus, April 28, 2010
    This stylus is not only perfect for those small areas, but for the entire screen! I bought mine for typing and playing solitare. It works perfectly! I found it to be of good quality and it easily attaches to the side of my GTMax Leather Flip case with its attached clip. Excellent buy! Read more


    14. Sony 4 GB Memory Stick PRO Duo Flash Memory Card MSMT4G
    Electronics
    list price: $38.99 -- our price: $19.21
    (price subject to change: see help)
    Asin: B0013AX2JM
    Manufacturer: Sony
    Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars
    US | Canada | United Kingdom | Germany | France | Japan

    Editorial Review

    4gb Memory Stick Pro Duo Mark2 Flshmedia ... Read more

    Reviews

    4-0 out of 5 stars Sony Memory Pro Duo II - Fast But Expensive Memory for Your Sony Devices, June 2, 2008
    At Least two of the Sony Packaged Memory's Pictured here on Amazon are FAKES or COUNTERFITS.

    UNUSABLE MEMORY.

    The people that make these are taking non-sony generic crap 512's, 1,2,or4 G size chips
    and creating very elaborate nearly perfect (looking) FAKES! Zoom in and look very closely
    at the model numbers for the 8 and the 16 Gig. In the third and forth images you can plainly see
    the fake model numbers I have shown below.

    Their numbers do not exist in the True Sony lineup.

    for example: MSX-M8GST/X & MSX-M16GST/X do not exist <<< BOTH ARE FAKE

    Dont believe me,, go look it up for yourself ,,, GOOGLE it or look at the links below.


    THE NUMBERS SHOULD SAY

    for MARKII MS-MT8G & MS-MT16G Also there is an 8g that is not MARKII it is MSX-M8GS/X << older model.

    There is never a T toward the end of the model number in these particular Larger memories,
    and NO MARKII's ever have a /X or a MSX !!! in the model # at all!
    This fake erroneous numbering scheme was barrowed from the 1G MSPD which has the number > MSX-M1GST/X

    and from what I can tell is the only Sony Stick to EVER have the T in that location!

    Take the time to look at these links which are both VERY, VERY Informative on the Subject.
    Look In Comments for them:

    [...]
    [...]


    You should also know there not just doing these Sony Memory Sticks. Sandisk and Lexar as well as all forms of
    flash memories and USB Thumb Drives including Kingston, as well as Many Others are being FAKED....

    5-0 out of 5 stars Works Great With PSP, March 24, 2008
    This 16GB Memory Stick Duo II card works great with the PSP portable gaming system. It comes pre-formatted, so all you have to do is stick it into your PSP and go. In fact, there is a picture of the PSP right on the packaging.

    The usable space on this device is actually 14.9 GB, however.

    The "Mark2" certification on the card has to do with higher writing speed requirements and indicates the memory is certified to operate with AVCHD recording products.

    5-0 out of 5 stars Bought this for my PSP, May 15, 2008
    This is currently the only available 16GB Memory Stick. I bought it for my Playstation Portable in order to replace an 8GB Memory Stick.
    Regarding the price you can easily argue that it is much cheaper to buy two 8GB Memory Sticks. And for any person who is concerned about spending money I would not recommend this product.
    At the time I bought it, Amazon was offering the best price online. Regarding the fact that this Memory Stick is about $50 more expensive than the PSP itself, makes you think twice. But my sole purpose was that I wanted to keep things together: my music, videos and saved games etc.
    This Memory Stick is large enough to satisfy my thirst for disc space with a single solution.

    The Memory Stick works fine in my PSP. Before this one I used a Sandisk 8GB Memory Stick Pro Ultra and I cannot see a difference in read/write speed (while connected through USB to my PC).

    Final thoughts:
    If you are concerned about spending money and you can live with more than one MS for your gadgets, you should get two or more 8GB MS. If you want a single solution and price is of no matter, get this one. Since it is from Sony you can be sure it works with your MS-enabled gadgets.

    Pro:
    - high capacity
    - read/write speed is up to par with other (higher ranked) memory sticks (using the PSP USB connection!)

    Con:
    - not cheap

    5 out of 5 stars; simply because the price does not matter to me

    (My guess is that the price will drop to about $150 once other manufactures offer similar capacity.)

    1-0 out of 5 stars Fake 16GB memory stick pro dua from Amazon directly, July 15, 2009
    I'm aparently also a victim of the fake cards. Ordered the 16GB Sony memory stick pro duo directly from Amazon. Received it (unaware of fake cards going around), formatted it in my PSP without problems. Then tried to load data to the card via my card reader. Card reader didn't recognize the card. Card reader was old so purchased a new one from Best Buy. Recognized the card but transfers were incredibly slow and data got corrupted. Checked with manufacturer of reader and they indicated they only tested up to 4GB. Bought yet another reader with guaranteed support for all speeds and capacities. Same problem. Checked online and found out about the fake cards. I already threw out the packaging believing the card readers to have been the problem. Amazon was kind enough to still ship me another card. Will wait and see if it is a genuine one. I would never have expected Amazon to be selling fake items...

    5-0 out of 5 stars Works great!, July 30, 2008
    READ BEFORE YOU ACT!!! BEWARE OF FAKE CARDS!!!
    I bought this Sony MSMT16G 16GB Memory Stick PRO Duo (Mark2) Media Card from one of Amazon "Featured Merchant". It came with a very original look like packaging, even a hologram on top. As soon as I insert it in to my video camera it did not recognized. I tried another same type camera and also a media card reader with no luck at all. Then I found lots of information on the net saying there are fake ones which won't work with cameras and else. So be careful don't buy a fake one, like me.

    5-0 out of 5 stars Real Authentic Memory card., July 14, 2008
    I bought this mainly for my PSP. 16 gigabytes is very sufficient to store tons of movies and games and the best thing is there aren't any glitches at all. :D

    5-0 out of 5 stars 16 Gigs of Satisfaction, July 16, 2008
    I bought the Sony 16GB Memory Stick PRO Duo for my PSP and I feel like I almost have too much space for pictures, game saves, music, and movies. Because of the 16GB of storage space, my PSP now rivals my iPod Nano plus I can fit a hand-full of full length films on it. More storage space is definitely a good thing; I am very happy with my purchase.

    4-0 out of 5 stars Sony Memory Pro Duo II - Fast But Expensive Memory for Your Sony Devices, June 2, 2008

    Even though I have been slowly weaning myself off of the newer Sony cameras, I still have some Sony devices that need memory pro duo cards. There are some advantages and a few disadvantages, namely the cost and availability. Sony's memory format averages 30 to 100 percent higher prices for the same capacity of SDHC cards. While that sucks, if you have a Sony Camera or a PSP there's not much you can do about it.

    To that point, both the new Sony Cybershot DSCT300 Digital Camera and upcoming PSP God of War Entertainment Pack will benefit from any of these memory cards. Both of those devices, along with most Sony devices for that matter are only comaptible with the memory duo platform.

    But like I said, if you need one of these cards, there are some advantages especially if you get a Mark II card. Namely, the performance speed of the mark II format is about 50% higher than the fastest available SDHC card at the moment. The rating is for 36 MB/s and what I've seen through some basic tests seems to indicate real performance close to this. In fact, the solid performance has to be the biggest pro for these cards. So while it sucks to have little choice, when you factor in the premium performance it's easier to swallow.

    The 2 and 4 GB cards are a better value than larger capacity ones right now. Sometimes you want the largest card you can get, but till the 8 and 16 GB cards come down I see no reason to buy them. Not to mention, this isn't for my primary camera but for an older one that I use as a backup.

    Make sure your device is compatible with the card. Some older electronics aren't compatible with larger capacities, although in general Sony has been better with making these guys backward compatible than others.

    It's always a good idea to have several extra cards on hand just in case. This 4 GB card is a nice performer. If you have a high capacity camera (10 Megapixels or more) and are storing videos or RAW images, the extra cash for the 8GB card may be worth it if the price is right. Or you may want to step up to the larger 16 GB size that is now available. But if you wait a little longer you can save yourself some cash. I have to take off at least 1 star for value, but in terms of performance I couldn't be happier.

    Enjoy!

    1-0 out of 5 stars Beware of FAKES, January 13, 2010
    At Least two of the Sony Packaged Memory's Pictured here on Amazon are FAKES or COUNTERFITS.

    UNUSABLE MEMORY.

    The people that make these are taking non-sony generic crap 512's, 1,2,or4 G size chips
    and creating very elaborate nearly perfect (looking) FAKES! Zoom in and look very closely
    at the model numbers for the 8 and the 16 Gig. In the third and forth images you can plainly see
    the fake model numbers I have shown below.

    Their numbers do not exist in the True Sony lineup.

    for example: MSX-M8GST/X & MSX-M16GST/X do not exist <<< BOTH ARE FAKE

    Dont believe me,, go look it up for yourself ,,, GOOGLE it or look at the links below.


    THE NUMBERS SHOULD SAY

    for MARKII MS-MT8G & MS-MT16G Also there is an 8g that is not MARKII it is MSX-M8GS/X << older model.

    There is never a T toward the end of the model number in these particular Larger memories,
    and NO MARKII's ever have a /X or a MSX !!! in the model # at all!
    This fake erroneous numbering scheme was barrowed from the 1G MSPD which has the number > MSX-M1GST/X

    and from what I can tell is the only Sony Stick to EVER have the T in that location!

    Take the time to look at these links which are both VERY, VERY Informative on the Subject.
    Look In Comments for them:

    [...]
    [...]


    You should also know there not just doing these Sony Memory Sticks. Sandisk and Lexar as well as all forms of
    flash memories and USB Thumb Drives including Kingston, as well as Many Others are being FAKED....

    5-0 out of 5 stars Works Great With PSP, March 24, 2008
    This 16GB Memory Stick Duo II card works great with the PSP portable gaming system. It comes pre-formatted, so all you have to do is stick it into your PSP and go. In fact, there is a picture of the PSP right on the packaging.

    The usable space on this device is actually 14.9 GB, however.

    The "Mark2" certification on the card has to do with higher writing speed requirements and indicates the memory is certified to operate with AVCHD recording products.

    5-0 out of 5 stars Bought this for my PSP, May 15, 2008
    This is currently the only available 16GB Memory Stick. I bought it for my Playstation Portable in order to replace an 8GB Memory Stick.
    Regarding the price you can easily argue that it is much cheaper to buy two 8GB Memory Sticks. And for any person who is concerned about spending money I would not recommend this product.
    At the time I bought it, Amazon was offering the best price online. Regarding the fact that this Memory Stick is about $50 more expensive than the PSP itself, makes you think twice. But my sole purpose was that I wanted to keep things together: my music, videos and saved games etc.
    This Memory Stick is large enough to satisfy my thirst for disc space with a single solution.

    The Memory Stick works fine in my PSP. Before this one I used a Sandisk 8GB Memory Stick Pro Ultra and I cannot see a difference in read/write speed (while connected through USB to my PC).

    Final thoughts:
    If you are concerned about spending money and you can live with more than one MS for your gadgets, you should get two or more 8GB MS. If you want a single solution and price is of no matter, get this one. Since it is from Sony you can be sure it works with your MS-enabled gadgets.

    Pro:
    - high capacity
    - read/write speed is up to par with other (higher ranked) memory sticks (using the PSP USB connection!)

    Con:
    - not cheap

    5 out of 5 stars; simply because the price does not matter to me

    (My guess is that the price will drop to about $150 once other manufactures offer similar capacity.)

    1-0 out of 5 stars Fake 16GB memory stick pro dua from Amazon directly, July 15, 2009
    I'm aparently also a victim of the fake cards. Ordered the 16GB Sony memory stick pro duo directly from Amazon. Received it (unaware of fake cards going around), formatted it in my PSP without problems. Then tried to load data to the card via my card reader. Card reader didn't recognize the card. Card reader was old so purchased a new one from Best Buy. Recognized the card but transfers were incredibly slow and data got corrupted. Checked with manufacturer of reader and they indicated they only tested up to 4GB. Bought yet another reader with guaranteed support for all speeds and capacities. Same problem. Checked online and found out about the fake cards. I already threw out the packaging believing the card readers to have been the problem. Amazon was kind enough to still ship me another card. Will wait and see if it is a genuine one. I would never have expected Amazon to be selling fake items...

    5-0 out of 5 stars Works great!, July 30, 2008
    Purchased this for my Sony Cyber-shot DSC-W150 camera based on the 25 great reviews before me. (Thanks, reviewers... I wasn't exactly sure what I was doing because the documentation that came with the camera didn't provide any help on how to buy memory!) I thought $38.50 was a great deal. It does the job and allows me to record video clips without feeling like I'm eating up all my memory. (For reference, about a minute and a half of video uses up about 200 shots out of the 2,500+ shots. Though I don't know if the resolution settings, etc. are factored into that estimate).

    1-0 out of 5 stars READ BEFORE YOU ACT!!! BEWARE OF FAKE CARDS!!!, December 1, 2008
    READ BEFORE YOU ACT!!! BEWARE OF FAKE CARDS!!!
    I bought this Sony MSMT16G 16GB Memory Stick PRO Duo (Mark2) Media Card from one of Amazon "Featured Merchant". It came with a very original look like packaging, even a hologram on top. As soon as I insert it in to my video camera it did not recognized. I tried another same type camera and also a media card reader with no luck at all. Then I found lots of information on the net saying there are fake ones which won't work with cameras and else. So be careful don't buy a fake one, like me.

    5-0 out of 5 stars Real Authentic Memory card., July 14, 2008
    I bought this mainly for my PSP. 16 gigabytes is very sufficient to store tons of movies and games and the best thing is there aren't any glitches at all. :D

    5-0 out of 5 stars 16 Gigs of Satisfaction, July 16, 2008
    I bought the Sony 16GB Memory Stick PRO Duo for my PSP and I feel like I almost have too much space for pictures, game saves, music, and movies. Because of the 16GB of storage space, my PSP now rivals my iPod Nano plus I can fit a hand-full of full length films on it. More storage space is definitely a good thing; I am very happy with my purchase.

    5-0 out of 5 stars Great, just does its job, July 26, 2008
    I have had this for a month and it works well. I call it "boring" as it ought to be. It just works and does not bother me. I have several and they have worked well too. This seems to be another of Sony's quality products. Read more


    15. Western Digital WD Elements 1 TB USB 2.0 Desktop External Hard Drive WDBAAU0010HBK-NESN
    Electronics
    list price: $129.99 -- our price: $76.47
    (price subject to change: see help)
    Asin: B002QEBMB4
    Manufacturer: Western Digital
    Average Customer Review: 4.4 out of 5 stars
    US | Canada | United Kingdom | Germany | France | Japan

    Editorial Review

    Designed with the same commitment to quality that made WD external drives the number one drives in the world, Western Digital’s WD Elements USB 2.0 external hard drives are the right answer for simply affordable add-on storage. Just plug it in to a USB port and start saving your photos, music, video, and files. Kit contains; USB 2.0 external hard drive, USB cable, AC adapter, Quick Install Guide. ... Read more

    Reviews

    5-0 out of 5 stars Very good hard drive!, November 23, 2009
    I bought this on sale at Fry's for $99, way below the amazon price. I wanted something simple as most hard drives these days come with their annoying built in software which cannot be deleted (like WD Essential Edition). This is a hassle free drive and is not bundled with any of the extra software which is exactly what I wanted. You simply plug it in and it works. It can easily be formatted to work with macs as well. I've been using WD hard drives for years and I own several models of the "essential" and "passport" editions. They are very reliable.

    This elements hard drive has a sleek and sexy, minimalist design. It is well built overall and constructed of durable plastic. There is a slot for the USB cable, a slot for the power adapter and a tiny circular white light which blinks when it is in use (the light is not overwhelming as some hard drives can be). All three of these features are on one side/face of the hard drive (as shown in the picture), so if you have this plugged in and it is facing away from you, you won't see the light at all. This doesn't bother me but it may be a turn off for some people.

    When in operation, it is very smooth and quiet compared to other WD hard drives I own. This may be due to the fact that it is closed entirely and there are no holes for ventilation as in other WD models. But this doesn't bother me because I just use this as a backup and don't need it on all of the time. This could (emphasis on "could") be an issue if you are constantly using your hard drive because it may become hot. I haven't experienced this at all, just speculating. If you are just backing up files and, say, watching a movie on your computer which is stored on the hard drive, I think you'll be fine and there won't be any heating issues.

    More info here on WD's website: [...]

    5-0 out of 5 stars Good value, no extra junk software!, December 2, 2009
    I bought 3 of these drives for $99 each around Black Friday. The value cannot be beat and I always prefer Western Digital due to their Advance Replacement policy.
    One of the drives had issues. I always check all new drives I buy with the Western Digital Life Diagnostics program which is available for free from Western Digital. All drives passed the test without issues. The test will take at least 12 hours to complete on such a large drive. One of the drives was dropping the transfer rate after copying 500 GB to it for no reason and I had to replace it. What is really disappointing is that the drive passed the test so I have no confidence in the diagnostic program anymore.

    The moment you receive the drive check your warranty online at the Western Digital website. The warranty for this model is only 1 year which I consider absolutely insufficient for a drive. The bad thing about it is that Western Digital starts counting from the manufacturing date and by the time you get it, the warranty left is only 9-10 months which is ridiculous. They will update the warranty to 1 year after the purchase date but you will have to send them the receipt and be patient. It took them 2 weeks to respond to an online request. They also have an option to extend the warranty for another 2 years for $25 per drive. I might consider that....
    I recommend this drive because the size, price and ease of use. It doesn't have any of the limitations of the fancier Western Digital drives. It is just a big, cheap external hard drive.


    Update - September 16 2010

    Today I bought another one and when cheking the warranty it was shorter by 6 months. I went through my regular procedure to write to WD Customer support when I realized they had a link that was addressing the issue. Now you can register the drive and it will update the warranty automatically. It even gives you 1 month more ! Also, the registration page gives information about warranty upgrades. You can upgrade this drive from 1 year to 3 years for $25. Not bad considering that if it dies after the first year (and all do after they are out of warranty) it is just a paperweight.

    My advices to everybody that buy WD drives are:

    1. Check your warranty ASAP.
    2. Register the drive to get it updated.


    5-0 out of 5 stars Excellent External Drive, May 2, 2010
    The Western Digital WD Elements is probably most notable for what it doesn't have:

    1) It doesn't have any clever "look at me" flasing/glowing/blinking lights. One tiny light in the back will confirm it is on. But you won't need to check because "it just works".

    2) It doesn't have any annoying, auto-loading, "I know better" software. There are lots of great backup programs available (freeware, shareware and built into most operating systems). And, of course, you can always just drag-and-drop files right onto the drive.

    3) It doesn't get hot. Heat is a killer for electronics so that is even more important than you might think.

    4) It doesn't make ANY sound.

    5) It doesn't take up much space. It is smaller and more compact than any other external drive that I have purchased.

    6) It doen't have any goofy stands or attachments. It is squared on all sides except the back so you can position it any way you want to.

    7) And finally, it doesn't cost much. Considering drive space for cost this is the best value I have ever gotten on a drive.

    For reference I have purchased two Seagate Freeagent drives, a 1 TB MyBook and have put several old drives into external drive enclosures. All of them are still working. I also have passing experience with several others from work and associates -- I like the WD Elements solution the best!

    5-0 out of 5 stars Total value for money!, January 11, 2010
    This is a great external hard drive for expanding your digital storage capacity. I was in need for added storage and wanted to go for the 2TB WD Elements External Hard Drive. I wasn't really happy with the prices I was seeing for the 2TB hard drive, and that is when I decided to check up on the 1.5TB drives. WOW! I was amazed at the price Amazon was offering these drives and I got two of them. Yes, two! (My work requires that kind of storage space)
    I got 3TB worth of storage for the price of a 2TB External hard drive!

    That said, let us talk about the performance of these drives -

    1) Build and form factor - Nice sleek looking enclosures. All black, the sides are fingerprint magnets with a glossy finish. The top and bottom panels have a matte finish. Looks matter to me, even if it just an external drive. The microUSB and AC sockets are closely spaced with a small white indicator light besides them. All in all very compact, sleek, and aesthetically pleasing device.
    2) Performance - I am getting constantly good speeds on these drives. Reads at 30MB/s and writes at about 24MB/s, which is good and fast enough for my needs.

    As always, users have to be careful with all hard drives, internal or external. I am handling my drives with the utmost care. I don't want to lose any important data.

    Finally, this drive is a complete value for money purchase. I say go for it if you are out looking for a large capacity external hard drive.

    5-0 out of 5 stars Very nice drive for a low price, November 23, 2009
    I picked this up from Fry's when it was on sale for 100 bucks.
    I like the price.
    I think the main differentiators between this and the higher price drive is that it has only 1 year warranty, and does not come bundled with any software to help you back up stuff.
    But seriously who uses any of those anyways? Drive is preformated to NTFS, if you have a mac you'll need to reformat to be able write to it.
    what I like:
    very small.-for a 3.5" drive. very quiet and does not vibrate as much as my seagate 1.5TB drives.-This maybe due to the drive running at a lower RPM. I couldn't find the SPEC to say what this drive spins at.
    Drive spins up and down(powers down) when not in use. very nice. the white power LED isn't overly bright.
    dislike: enclosure snaps together, making it hard to swap out the drive in the future. only 1 year warranty. but I think that the 1 year is pre-built into the pricing.




    4-0 out of 5 stars So far so good.., November 29, 2009
    Just received mine and it works with my HP LapTop under XP but although the drive shows up in Windows 7 you can't do anything with it. No Drive letter, no format, no nothing - device is working properly - you just can't use it. When you attempt to assign a drive letter in Disk Manager it complains that it needs a refresh which doesn't help.

    After 5 or 6 Emails back and forth with WD they informed me to contact either my PC manufacturer or Microsoft to resolve the issue. After scouring the internet seems there are LOTS of people with this exact same problem under Windows 7 Pro 64 bit edition. (Most seem to have an NVidia video card as well.) Here's the fix (no thanks to WD):

    1. Open Device Manager
    2. Locate the Drive
    3. Right Click - Uninstall
    4. Unplug drive USB Cable and plug it back in

    Transfers files at around 28 MB/sec. Other than this start up issue so far it's made a great back up drive.

    5-0 out of 5 stars Very nice hard drive with no excess frills., April 15, 2010
    I'm very glad I purchased this drive. The hard drive is enclosed in a somewhat heavy but simple metal case, and Western Digital seems to take great pains with their retail packaging to minimize shock without using excessive packaging materials. They are using a GreenPower drive in there, so it remains quiet, cool, and merely sips energy. However, do not expect this to be a speed demon. It runs at the same speed as your average notebook drive, so filling up a large capacity drive such as this one may take a long time. The drive also comes with the benefit (to me) of having absolutely no useless backup software preinstalled. The only real complaint I have lies with the AC adapter. I generally prefer a plug with the adapter separate. This one comes with a "wall-wart" which takes up far too much space on a surge protector.

    I've had about 5 WD drives in the past, and of those 5 only one has failed me. All drives will eventually fail, and as such I see the company's ability to help you much more important than whether or not a particular drive fails. WD is one of those companies that is fairly reasonable when it comes to RMA and replacement of their products, so that's always a good sign.

    Full formatted size for a 1.5TB drive is 1.35TB (as expected). Before placing anything valuable into something this large, I run Windows error checking, the company's diagnostic program (in this case WD Data Lifeguard found on their website), use full drive encryption by TrueCrypt to avoid being paranoid if I need to send it back for warranty, and finally I transfer and delete roughly a third of the drive's capacity a few times to stress test it. I've found that if a drive is to ever fail within a reasonable amount of time, this regimen will kill it and save me the trouble of an RMA in the relatively near future.

    5-0 out of 5 stars Very good hard drive!, November 23, 2009
    I work for Computing support at Arizona State University, and I have enough technical knowledge to be certified as a TECH JUNKIE :).

    I am a photographer too, so I have tons of Photos (about 160GB), Videos, Software, Movies and Documentaries. I was looking for a simple external hard drive without any backup software included, I am smart enough to do manual incremental backups with file tree structure intact (I use GOODSYNC to backup, its very simple and easy to use and free).

    I have looked at many many external HDDs and narrowed down to two models "Samsung Story 1TB - very good one too" and this one (I wanted it to be cheap too - got this for $85 on [...]). I did not go with other WD models because of their annoying Backup Software.

    Coming to the WD Elements 1TB: Its much smaller than I expected. It is dead silent, I had to touch it to convince myself that it was running, when I first turned it on. Its not too heavy either. The indicator light is placed at the rear, which is a very good thing (I find these LED's annoying, especially at night).

    After I did the first setup, I copied 383GB of data (931GB was total space). It took about 4hr 47min, speed varied between 20MBps to 37MBps. This is pretty good speed for USB 2.0. It was just a bit warm (my old segate hard drive would be very very hot for this amount of data transfer).

    I would recommend it to beginners or pros alike. I am very happy with this purchase!


    UPDATE:

    After about three months of heavy usage, it never gave up on me. Its still dead silent and works flawlessly. It never got even warm!!

    Follow these steps to get GOODSYNC for FREE:

    In the beginning GOODSYNC was free, later they made a paid version as it gained popularity..

    but there is a way to get PRO version for free...

    1. go to good sync website
    2. signup for a trial offer and you get PRO serial for free (I signed up for eMusic trial)
    3. Once you get the serial, end the subscription before the trial expires...

    NOTE: The above mentioned procedure may not work anymore :(

    UPDATE: 07-28-2010

    I sold my WD Elements 1TB and got a 2TB one a couple of months ago(as my data is on rise all the time), couldn't be happier :)
    I bought it from TigerDirect for [ ... ] and got [ ... ] cashback via [ ... ] ...awesome!!

    5-0 out of 5 stars Excellent, well designed product for the money!, November 19, 2009
    I bought this on sale at Fry's for $99, way below the amazon price. I wanted something simple as most hard drives these days come with their annoying built in software which cannot be deleted (like WD Essential Edition). This is a hassle free drive and is not bundled with any of the extra software which is exactly what I wanted. You simply plug it in and it works. It can easily be formatted to work with macs as well. I've been using WD hard drives for years and I own several models of the "essential" and "passport" editions. They are very reliable.

    This elements hard drive has a sleek and sexy, minimalist design. It is well built overall and constructed of durable plastic. There is a slot for the USB cable, a slot for the power adapter and a tiny circular white light which blinks when it is in use (the light is not overwhelming as some hard drives can be). All three of these features are on one side/face of the hard drive (as shown in the picture), so if you have this plugged in and it is facing away from you, you won't see the light at all. This doesn't bother me but it may be a turn off for some people.

    When in operation, it is very smooth and quiet compared to other WD hard drives I own. This may be due to the fact that it is closed entirely and there are no holes for ventilation as in other WD models. But this doesn't bother me because I just use this as a backup and don't need it on all of the time. This could (emphasis on "could") be an issue if you are constantly using your hard drive because it may become hot. I haven't experienced this at all, just speculating. If you are just backing up files and, say, watching a movie on your computer which is stored on the hard drive, I think you'll be fine and there won't be any heating issues.

    More info here on WD's website: [...]

    5-0 out of 5 stars Good value, no extra junk software!, December 2, 2009
    I purchased the 1tb Elements (WDBAAU0010HBK-NESN) for use with a Dish DVR 622.

    Installation was was truly "plug and play". I simply took it out of the box, plugged it in, and it was immediately recognized by the DVR. I have since transferred about 200gb of content to/from it, and have watched content directly from the drive. So far, it is working perfectly. It automatically spins down after a few minutes of non-use, as well as when the DVR is powered off. It also spins back up automatically (less than 10 seconds) when the DVR accesses it.

    One thing some people might not like: The case is designed to sit flat (as pictured), not on its side. There are four small non-skid pads on the bottom corners, but none on either side. There is no indication on the box, in the documentation, or on Western Digital's web site as to whether the drive will work properly on edge. As a general rule, WD drives are designed to operate sideways or even upside down (any X,Y,Z orientation), so this one probably will too -- but you'll need to provide your own non-skid pads.

    Several similar Western Digital drives, such as the late model "My Book" series, now include a firmware-based CD-partition that is difficult to remove, and can cause compatibility issues with some devices. That partition contains backup software and utilities that are of questionable value in any case, and of absolutely no value when using the drive with a non-computer device (like the Dish DVR). The Elements -- at least at time of this review -- doesn't include any of that junk. (Note: WD does have a downloadable utility to remove the partition from the other drives, but if you don't want that junk then save yourself the time/trouble and just buy the Elements drive.)

    5-0 out of 5 stars Register the drive with Western Digital to get the warranty updated !, December 16, 2009
    I bought 3 of these drives for $99 each around Black Friday. The value cannot be beat and I always prefer Western Digital due to their Advance Replacement policy.
    One of the drives had issues. I always check all new drives I buy with the Western Digital Life Diagnostics program which is available for free from Western Digital. All drives passed the test without issues. The test will take at least 12 hours to complete on such a large drive. One of the drives was dropping the transfer rate after copying 500 GB to it for no reason and I had to replace it. What is really disappointing is that the drive passed the test so I have no confidence in the diagnostic program anymore.

    The moment you receive the drive check your warranty online at the Western Digital website. The warranty for this model is only 1 year which I consider absolutely insufficient for a drive. The bad thing about it is that Western Digital starts counting from the manufacturing date and by the time you get it, the warranty left is only 9-10 months which is ridiculous. They will update the warranty to 1 year after the purchase date but you will have to send them the receipt and be patient. It took them 2 weeks to respond to an online request. They also have an option to extend the warranty for another 2 years for $25 per drive. I might consider that....
    I recommend this drive because the size, price and ease of use. It doesn't have any of the limitations of the fancier Western Digital drives. It is just a big, cheap external hard drive.


    Update - September 16 2010

    Today I bought another one and when cheking the warranty it was shorter by 6 months. I went through my regular procedure to write to WD Customer support when I realized they had a link that was addressing the issue. Now you can register the drive and it will update the warranty automatically. It even gives you 1 month more ! Also, the registration page gives information about warranty upgrades. You can upgrade this drive from 1 year to 3 years for $25. Not bad considering that if it dies after the first year (and all do after they are out of warranty) it is just a paperweight.

    My advices to everybody that buy WD drives are:

    1. Check your warranty ASAP.
    2. Register the drive to get it updated.


    5-0 out of 5 stars Excellent External Drive, May 2, 2010
    The Western Digital WD Elements is probably most notable for what it doesn't have:

    1) It doesn't have any clever "look at me" flasing/glowing/blinking lights. One tiny light in the back will confirm it is on. But you won't need to check because "it just works".

    2) It doesn't have any annoying, auto-loading, "I know better" software. There are lots of great backup programs available (freeware, shareware and built into most operating systems). And, of course, you can always just drag-and-drop files right onto the drive.

    3) It doesn't get hot. Heat is a killer for electronics so that is even more important than you might think.

    4) It doesn't make ANY sound.

    5) It doesn't take up much space. It is smaller and more compact than any other external drive that I have purchased.

    6) It doen't have any goofy stands or attachments. It is squared on all sides except the back so you can position it any way you want to.

    7) And finally, it doesn't cost much. Considering drive space for cost this is the best value I have ever gotten on a drive.

    For reference I have purchased two Seagate Freeagent drives, a 1 TB MyBook and have put several old drives into external drive enclosures. All of them are still working. I also have passing experience with several others from work and associates -- I like the WD Elements solution the best!

    5-0 out of 5 stars Total value for money!, January 11, 2010
    This is a great external hard drive for expanding your digital storage capacity. I was in need for added storage and wanted to go for the 2TB WD Elements External Hard Drive. I wasn't really happy with the prices I was seeing for the 2TB hard drive, and that is when I decided to check up on the 1.5TB drives. WOW! I was amazed at the price Amazon was offering these drives and I got two of them. Yes, two! (My work requires that kind of storage space)
    I got 3TB worth of storage for the price of a 2TB External hard drive!

    That said, let us talk about the performance of these drives -

    1) Build and form factor - Nice sleek looking enclosures. All black, the sides are fingerprint magnets with a glossy finish. The top and bottom panels have a matte finish. Looks matter to me, even if it just an external drive. The microUSB and AC sockets are closely spaced with a small white indicator light besides them. All in all very compact, sleek, and aesthetically pleasing device.
    2) Performance - I am getting constantly good speeds on these drives. Reads at 30MB/s and writes at about 24MB/s, which is good and fast enough for my needs.

    As always, users have to be careful with all hard drives, internal or external. I am handling my drives with the utmost care. I don't want to lose any important data.

    Finally, this drive is a complete value for money purchase. I say go for it if you are out looking for a large capacity external hard drive.

    5-0 out of 5 stars Very nice drive for a low price, November 23, 2009
    I picked this up from Fry's when it was on sale for 100 bucks.
    I like the price.
    I think the main differentiators between this and the higher price drive is that it has only 1 year warranty, and does not come bundled with any software to help you back up stuff.
    But seriously who uses any of those anyways? Drive is preformated to NTFS, if you have a mac you'll need to reformat to be able write to it.
    what I like:
    very small.-for a 3.5" drive. very quiet and does not vibrate as much as my seagate 1.5TB drives.-This maybe due to the drive running at a lower RPM. I couldn't find the SPEC to say what this drive spins at.
    Drive spins up and down(powers down) when not in use. very nice. the white power LED isn't overly bright.
    dislike: enclosure snaps together, making it hard to swap out the drive in the future. only 1 year warranty. but I think that the 1 year is pre-built into the pricing.




    4-0 out of 5 stars So far so good.., November 29, 2009
    I was originally going to purchase the Western Digital WD Elements 1 TB USB 2.0 Desktop External Hard Drive (model WDE1UBK10000N). My sister in-law has that model and it truly is built like a tank. Metal case, rubber protectors on each end. It really looks like it could take few bumps. I picked up this particular model because I saw it on sale for $60 at the store that has a red bullseye for a logo. For that price I'd be silly not to snag it up.

    As others mentioned it has a plastic case which is ok. Metal would've been nicer. And it is completely silent. Other than seeing the white light in the back blinking when transferring files, I cannot tell that it is actually working. But it is working :). I transferred 149 gb of data from my old external drive to this one in about 3 hours. It's usb so I'm used to relatively slow transfers. The true test will be if it lasts as long as my iomega external hard drive which I've had for over 6 years. Even though it's old, it has a small fan, an on/off switch, a long power cord and it feels like it can take a bump. I just needed a back up in the event the old work horse died on me.

    Good:
    + cheap - $60 for "1TB" of storage space
    + plug and play
    + no annoying preloaded software
    + very quiet
    + barely warm after extended use(my old drive would get noticeably warm even with its built-in fan)

    Not so good:
    - plastic case. probably good idea not to lug this around too much.
    - edges are shiny and attracts finger prints (this really didn't matter to me, but I thought I'd mention it
    - short power cord ~6'4" (old drive's power cord is over 11'), though usb cord is a bit longer than my old drive (4'3" vs. 3'5"). It would've been better to add length on the power cord and shorten the usb.
    - no fan

    Price was the determining factor in choosing this drive over the "tank". If this can last as long as my old external hard drive then it will be $60 well spent.

    ***************************************************
    UPDATE (11/29/09):
    - actual storage space of 931 gb is a bit confusing at first. Per comments and some google searching 931gb is correct. Don't be alarmed when you first see the available space on your external hard drive.

    4-0 out of 5 stars Issues with Windows 7 Pro 64, June 2, 2010
    Just received mine and it works with my HP LapTop under XP but although the drive shows up in Windows 7 you can't do anything with it. No Drive letter, no format, no nothing - device is working properly - you just can't use it. When you attempt to assign a drive letter in Disk Manager it complains that it needs a refresh which doesn't help.

    After 5 or 6 Emails back and forth with WD they informed me to contact either my PC manufacturer or Microsoft to resolve the issue. After scouring the internet seems there are LOTS of people with this exact same problem under Windows 7 Pro 64 bit edition. (Most seem to have an NVidia video card as well.) Here's the fix (no thanks to WD):

    1. Open Device Manager
    2. Locate the Drive
    3. Right Click - Uninstall
    4. Unplug drive USB Cable and plug it back in

    Transfers files at around 28 MB/sec. Other than this start up issue so far it's made a great back up drive.

    5-0 out of 5 stars Very nice hard drive with no excess frills., April 15, 2010
    I'm very glad I purchased this drive. The hard drive is enclosed in a somewhat heavy but simple metal case, and Western Digital seems to take great pains with their retail packaging to minimize shock without using excessive packaging materials. They are using a GreenPower drive in there, so it remains quiet, cool, and merely sips energy. However, do not expect this to be a speed demon. It runs at the same speed as your average notebook drive, so filling up a large capacity drive such as this one may take a long time. The drive also comes with the benefit (to me) of having absolutely no useless backup software preinstalled. The only real complaint I have lies with the AC adapter. I generally prefer a plug with the adapter separate. This one comes with a "wall-wart" which takes up far too much space on a surge protector.

    I've had about 5 WD drives in the past, and of those 5 only one has failed me. All drives will eventually fail, and as such I see the company's ability to help you much more important than whether or not a particular drive fails. WD is one of those companies that is fairly reasonable when it comes to RMA and replacement of their products, so that's always a good sign.

    Full formatted size for a 1.5TB drive is 1.35TB (as expected). Before placing anything valuable into something this large, I run Windows error checking, the company's diagnostic program (in this case WD Data Lifeguard found on their website), use full drive encryption by TrueCrypt to avoid being paranoid if I need to send it back for warranty, and finally I transfer and delete roughly a third of the drive's capacity a few times to stress test it. I've found that if a drive is to ever fail within a reasonable amount of time, this regimen will kill it and save me the trouble of an RMA in the relatively near future. Read more


    16. SanDisk 8 GB Class 2 SDHC Flash Memory Card SDSDB-8192 (Bulk Packaging)
    Electronics
    list price: $24.99 -- our price: $6.70
    (price subject to change: see help)
    Asin: B0018BOLIC
    Manufacturer: SanDisk
    Average Customer Review: 4.2 out of 5 stars
    US | Canada | United Kingdom | Germany | France | Japan

    Editorial Review

    Sandisk 8GB SDHC Memory Card ... Read more

    Reviews

    5-0 out of 5 stars Great Class 2 card, but make sure you have an SDHC reader., June 2, 2008
    Please note that this is a Class 2 card (Class 6 is the current "top of the line"). Class 2 transfers two mega-thingies per second rather than the six mega-thingies per second for Class 6 cards.

    This transfer rate is fine for most devices, but takes 3 times as long to copy files back and forth from your computer.

    Please also note that older card readers are not able to handle SDHC (HC stands for "High Capacity"). Some card readers are good for only 1 GB, some go up to 2 GB or 4 GB, but only the latest generations are capable of 8 GB.

    Lastly, if you are using Windows XP, you may need to either add Service Pack 3 or add a patch before the high capacity card can be recognized by your system.

    I recommend adding the patch rather than SP3. Some things haven't been working quite right since I installed the latest service pack from Microsoft - you may not wish to take that chance...

    5-0 out of 5 stars Sandisk 8GB SD Memory Card Works Well, March 25, 2008
    8GB is more than enough for my Canon PowerShot. I recently went to New York City for vacation and took more than 250 plus pics with the best pixel quality the camera could provide and still had more than enough memory left. Highly recommend this product. You don't need to carry any extra memory.

    5-0 out of 5 stars 8 gig SDHC card works very well!, March 25, 2008
    I found the performance excellent and the size very compact to carry about without difficulty of damage or weight reduction on travel. The price too is very competitive compared with in-shop prices.

    5-0 out of 5 stars Great Product, July 6, 2008
    This is the best value for the quality for a SD card of this size. I Highly recommend this to anyone that needs storage. I purchased this for my Nikon D40 Digital SLR camera, and it works beautifully. I have plenty of room to storage photographs.

    5-0 out of 5 stars Works as it should!, July 1, 2008
    What can I say? This product works perfectly in my Canon FS100 camcorder. No issues with corrupt data (knock on wood) and the write speed is adequate...no delays noticed during camcorder use. Sure, there are cheaper SDHC cards out there but I have used Sandisk in the past and have never had a problem with them.

    5-0 out of 5 stars 8Gb memory for camera, June 30, 2008
    Great so far. I went to an air show in Anchorage and I was able to do a lot of videos.

    1-0 out of 5 stars Beware, December 4, 2010
    The price looks good but this company eats you alive on shipping in my opinion. I received 2 SD cards ( 1.2 x 2 x 3.8 inch total, this counts their clear protective slips, and these were shipped in a 5 x 8 bubble mailer using USPS First Class. For this the company charged $11.90. REALLY? COME ON.
    Do not fall for this. Amazon needs to address these guys who overcharge for S/Handeling or face customers moving on.

    1-0 out of 5 stars SanDisk 8GB SDHC problem, September 16, 2009
    This card was purchased in 6/09 for use in a new Canon 780IS camera that IS sdhc compatible. At first it worked great and it was wonderful to have such a large amount of memory available for stills and video. then after about a month it got glitchy and I received intermittent memory card error messages that would resolve by removing and reinserting the card. After another 2 weeks it is useless, won't read, won't write not in the camera nor in my computer (where it worked fine before). It's not the camera because all the other SD/SDHC cards I've tried work fine. I know Sandisk has a 5 year warranty, but like a trusting person I did not keep the receipt so I guess that's that. Pity because i have never had problems with Sandisk products before. Read more


    17. My Passport Essential 500 GB USB 2.0 Portable External Hard Drive WDBAAA5000AD6-NESN
    Electronics
    list price: $119.99 -- our price: $85.00
    (price subject to change: see help)
    Asin: B003ZK5NZY
    Manufacturer: Western Digital
    Sales Rank: 141
    Average Customer Review: 4.6 out of 5 stars
    US | Canada | United Kingdom | Germany | France | Japan

    Editorial Review

    See your life safe in one place with wd’s ultra-portable my passport™ essential™ usb drive. wd smartware™ software automatically and continuously backs up your data, gives you a visual display of your backup as it happens, and helps you easily restore files. the drive also features password protection and hardware-based encryption. ... Read more

    Reviews

    5-0 out of 5 stars What a nice drive!!, December 6, 2010
    Okay, despite of all the negative reviews I have seen for this portable drive, I would say there is a doubt
    about them.

    This is the Second drive "My Passport Essential 500GB" I get, the first was Black midnight color, the second was
    the Amazon Exclusive Robot Design. Both comes already NTFS formatted with 465GB ready to use. you could format it
    to other File Systems if you like to make it work for MacOS X or Linux.

    The Black one had the Virtual CD that keeps nagging me. And popping up every time you hook up the usb with your
    computer which can disabled by updating the firmware from Western Digital website. but you can not delete it,
    nevertheless it's not taking any space from the drive itself.

    The Robot Design one, on the contrary, doesn't have the Virtual CD installed, and the first time you plug it in
    you could see Western Digital SmartWare backup solution on the drive itself, which you can easily delete.

    One of the folders that comes installed by default contains the drivers for WD SES Device, you need this to fully
    install device driver without failing, although the drive will work and appears in "My Computer" without it.

    I admit the Glossy finish on the black drive is fingerprint/dust magnet and can be easily scrathed, but its
    beauty makes it tolerable. Robot Design makes the dust, fingerprints and even scratches harder to see.

    About performance, I wont lie to say it's faster than my old laptops internal drive, I copied 3GB of data in less
    than 2 minutes, allow me to go out of this review's scope a little bit so you can even improve the drive's
    performance further if you go to "My Computer-> Right Click on My Passport drive -> Properties -> Select Hardware
    tab -> make sure WD My Passport is selected from the list that contains available drives in your computer ->
    Click Properties -> Select Policies tab -> Now select Optimize for Performance click Ok then Ok again. Now you
    will notice significant improvement on drive speed, but that way you can't unplug the drive without clicking on
    Safely remove drive from system tray icons near the clock" running Win Vista here, Win7 will differ a little bit,
    but there is the same option around in these tabs.

    The cool thing about this drive it doesn't need external power supply, despite of saying it needs USB 2.0 to work
    with I successfully plugged it in Playstation 2 which uses USB 1.1 and it works flawlessly, this is just an
    example you wont benefit anything from doing this unless you have the reasons to do so. but this means it could
    work with older computers with USB 1.1 boards.

    The USB cable a bit short, it would be better if it's 1ft longer.
    The Drive is calm, no noise while operating the drive and no heat.
    The Size is so small you could put it in your jacket's chest pocket.

    The last thing to say that Amazon's Exclusive Robot Design a little bit better than the Black since it doesn't
    have the Virtual CD thing, and you can't beat the price it's $30 cheaper (at the time of writing this $49.99 for
    Robot Design VS $79.99 for the Black midnight) I couldn't resist but to buy one..

    I hope this review would be helpful to some, and forgive my rants if I went off topic.

    Regards, Rebel_X :)

    5-0 out of 5 stars Great External Hard Drive.!, December 3, 2010
    I bought the Limited Edition Robot Design before to read any review here. After I bought it, I felt very frustrated because of the virtual cd and the firmware update and all that bad reviews....

    I received it and plugged it, and it was like a miracle! it did not request to install anything, It does not come with any virtual cd or anything like that. It works perfectly.!

    The unit has a separate folder where you can find the WD SmartWare software, and you install it just if you want to use it as auto backup drive, but what I needed was extra storage only, and it works perfectly.!! The same way any other external hard drive.

    I write this review just those who have doubts about buying this unit because of the other reviews.. I want to let you know that if you buy the Limited Edition Robot Design, you will not have to deal with any firmware update nor anything like that.

    I hightly recommend this product.

    4-0 out of 5 stars Passport Drives, October 19, 2010
    I have purchased 2 similar models to this one and I have been very happy with both of them. They are slim and compact and work very well. The price here on Amazon is not bad, but if you do not mind refurbished, you can save tons more right from Western Digital. If you go to their site and look for refurbished you can get a very good deal with the same 1 year warranty. I got my 320gb and 250gb drives last year both under 50$. Good luck and enjoy!

    4-0 out of 5 stars Can Confirm No Mandatory Backup, December 9, 2010
    As the most recent reviewers have noted, this drive does not have the mandatory backup software issues that the prior version seemed to have had. There were a ton of negative reviews on here (which seem to have disappeared now -- presumably since this is a slightly diff't product) centered on the fact that there was a buggy piece of software on here for mandatory backups that made the hard drive difficult to use as a plain dumb storage drive. Well I just purchased this from Amazon when the price got knocked down to $49 and can report that no such mandatory software problem exists. When you plug it in, it behaves like any other storage drive. No prompts to install anything or run any backups. Two minor issues though: a) it still has some silly bloatware that can be easily deleted and b) there does still seem to be an invisible partition for the backup software stuff and it's challenging to remove. But all in, those two items encompass about 35mb I think. Nothing major.

    5-0 out of 5 stars great little hard drive, December 7, 2010
    I love this thing. Replacing a bulky old external USB hard drive that required external power. This one is twice the capacity and 20% of the size, super quiet, and it's the cheapest 500GB hard drive on Amazon at the moment. Everyone is complaining about the back-up software. I have done nothing special to this drive and that condition doesn't exist for me. Maybe they stopped auto installing it on newer versions. I plugged it into my Windows XP machine and it installed as a regular drive. I'm able to drag and drop documents, create folders, etc with no issues. I do see some extra folders that came with it like WD SmartWare, User Manuals, and Extras - but that doesn't bother me as it seems common practice to bundle a few apps on hard drives and USB memory sticks. I bought this thing expecting to spend an hour updating the firmware, but it doesn't seem like I need to. I went with this model knowing that it had low reviews for that sole reason and I really don't mind saving $10-$20 to click a button and wait an hour for a firmware update. I intended to rate it well even if I had to update the firmware, but I found that unecessary. I also have a Windows 7 machine so we'll see what happens once I plug into there.

    1-0 out of 5 stars Never Buying A Western Digital Hard Drive AGAIN!, November 29, 2010
    These WD Hard drives with "WD Smartware" are a huge pain. They have an extra very small partition that acts like a Virtual CD drive. When you plug the hard drive into your computer, WD smartware software runs. It can be very annoying and sometimes can cause problems. For example, It won't work with you PS3 until you get the WD Smartware off. The problem is WD meant for this extra partition to be permanent. They created a way for you to "disable" the software, but the partition is still there, and it still won't work with your PS3. So, I spent a good 4 or 5 hours trying to format this thing to get rid of the extra partition. It was difficult. The normal windows disk utility couldn't do it (I couldn't get it to work on my Mac either), so i had to download and try a few different disk formatting utilities. That was after spending hours doing what the WD website recommended. Eventually I got it cleaned up and it does work on my PlayStation. I'm really disappointed in Western Digital for trying to force this on their customers without out a simple way to get rid of it.


    Final verdict: If you don't mind installing the WD Smartware on every computer you want to use the hard drive on, and don't plan to use this with a PS3, then this hard drive is probably fine. The WD Smartware offers some okay stuff like password protection. BUT, if you want a normal external hard drive that acts just like a thumb drive with no surprises, get something else and make sure it does not have "WD Smartware" on it.

    5-0 out of 5 stars WII's best friend, December 13, 2010
    This 500 GB is really nice and compact. It does come with the backup program but you do not need to install it. So that means that you have a super nice compact drive for a super nice compact price.... Note in the picture the trim is white the actual drive you get will have a black trim. Still looks good. I'm thinking about picking up another one.

    P.S. To whom it may concern get this drive for your WII needs.

    5-0 out of 5 stars Almost as cute as Wall-E, October 28, 2010

    Customer review from the Amazon Vine™ Program (What's this?)
    I have been wanting an external hard drive for years and not only is this one more than big enough at 500 GB, but it's physically very small and has a neat little robot design on the top. Like most people, I have tons of music, photos, videos and other documents, so now I no longer have the fear of my computer blowing up one day and losing it all. There is only a tiny light that stays on when in use, but it does get warm if it's connected for a long period of time, though that is a very minor negative. Thanks to this device I will no longer be jumping head first out an open window if my computer decides to bite the dust.

    5-0 out of 5 stars Love It!, October 26, 2010

    Customer review from the Amazon Vine™ Program (What's this?)
    500 gigs, smaller than my wallet, and one click automatic backup. Plus a cool robot graphic on the skin. What's not to like?

    Using a USB 2.0, it took about 4 hours to fill this baby up with music and movies, and it's a snap to transfer big files from my desktop to my laptop.

    No noise at all, but it does get warm.

    What I really like is that it doesn't have a bright light (if you have an array of HDDs, all glowing blue, that you don't turn off at night, it lights up a room.) This emits just a pinpoint of light, very low key.

    For the price, and the size, and the speed, it's the best and easiest 500gb external you can buy. Highly recommended.

    5-0 out of 5 stars Love it!, October 26, 2010

    Customer review from the Amazon Vine™ Program (What's this?)
    This drive is small and practicably weightless for the amount of memory. I like the shiny outer image. So far I've been using it for a week with a linux machine and have had absolutely no problems with formatting or using the drive. We'll see how it goes, but I'm very happy. Read more

    18. SanDisk 16 GB Class 2 microSDHC Flash Memory Card SDSDQ-016G (Bulk Packaging)
    Electronics
    list price: $99.99 -- our price: $19.49
    (price subject to change: see help)
    Asin: B001L1H0SC
    Manufacturer: SanDisk
    Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars
    US | Canada | United Kingdom | Germany | France | Japan

    Editorial Review

    SanDisk is proud to announce our newest format and capacity to the SD card family: microSD High Capacity (microSDHC) 16GB flash card.

    Not all devices support microSDHC 16.0GB cards. Please contact your device manufacturer for details. To ensure compatibility, look for the microSDHC logo on the product or packaging of your new phone or PDA.

    ... Read more

    Reviews

    4-0 out of 5 stars For now, this is the best the US has, January 31, 2009
    This micro SDHC card is the best in the US market. Samsung has developed a 32GB one but it is only available in Asia at the time of this writing. With that said, this is a good card. I bought it for my Blackberry Curve 8300. If you are going to use it for a Blackberry, make sure that you have the Blackberry OS 4.5 or later as it will not read the whole 16GB if you do not.

    Even though this is a Class 2 card (the 16GB Class 4's, like the 32GB cards, are only available in Asia right now), it reads and writes fairly quickly. The card is fast enough to record and play videos on my Curve, and saving a couple minute video after shooting it literally takes seconds to write.

    I have two minor gripes about this card, and they aren't that bad. One is the price. You can get an 8GB card for less than half of the price of this one. However, it is still "new" so that's the penalty for being an early adopter.

    The other gripe I have is that with the Samsung reader (see the bundle Amazon sells with this card) will NOT format this card in anything other than FAT32. Now the Curve can't understand NTFS, so for me it's not a big deal, but for someone who may want to use this as take away storage, just be aware of that.

    Other than that, I think this card is great. Also please note this card DOES come with an SD adapter. Don't let the Bulk Packaging fool you. If you have an SD card reader, you will not have to go out and buy a separate card reader for this. Save yourself the 5 bucks if you can. I hope this review was helpful.

    5-0 out of 5 stars Works with a Sansa Fuze, March 28, 2009
    The card arrived when they said it would. Took it out of the box and stuck it in my MP3 player, the Sansa Fuze (2GB model) and it recognized it immediately and I was able to start putting music on it (didn't need to format it). I put about 10GB of music on it which took roughly 2 hrs to load. After the initial upload of all my music. Adding a new album only took a couple of minutes. After I disconnect the Fuze from the computer it took approx 8-10 minutes to refresh the media library. I have the latest firmware update for the Fuze (maybe older firmware versions are slower - I don't know). The upload speeds didn't bother me because I'm only loading my whole library once and then its only a song/album or two at a time and that's only a few minutes. The card came with a SD adapter - so if you have a SD reader your set. I now have a 18GB MP3 Player!

    1-0 out of 5 stars Beware high failure rate of this card! :(, May 25, 2009
    I bought this card in February 2009 and it eventually failed by May 2009. I have of course only anecdotal evidence, but if you search around the Sandisk support forums and other places, you will find a lot of very upset customers complaining of the high failure rate of these Sandisk 16GB SDHC cards after a 2-3 months of use. To compound the problem, Sandisk only offers a 30 day return or refund period warranty on their flash memory cards which is atrocious in my opinion!! Unfortunately, most resellers here on Amazon only have a 30 day return policy as well assuming you have the product still in the original packaging. So overall, you are screwed if and WHEN the card does eventually fail. Thus, I recommend you not rely on this card to store important data like pictures and such. I unfortunately found this out the hard way. It just seems that this card is just not as reliable as advertised, and I am quite disappointed in the lack of at minimum one year manufacture's warranty for these cards by Sandisk. Buyer beware!!

    3-0 out of 5 stars Great at the time but go for at least a class 4 now, July 29, 2009
    I bought this six months ago (in January 2009) because it was the only 16GB micro SDHC card available. I needed it to dump as much of my music as I could onto my BlackBerry Bold. It has worked fine for the most part. However, if I were buying such a card today, I would search out at least a class 4 card and probably a class 6, both of which are now available here on Amazon (A-DATA MicroSDHC 16GB Class 6 Turbo With SD Adapter 16GUSDHC6 (Black); Sandisk 16GB Ultra microSDHC CLASS 4 / MobileMate micro Reader (SDSDQY-016G-S11M, Retail Package)).

    To the extent that it is a problem, my BlackBerry scans this class 2 card when I do a restart -- and is sluggish during that time -- so because I have almost the entire card filled up, it can take the BB a good five minutes to scan the card because a class 2 card has a slower read speed. That's a good five minutes of unwanted sluggishness after a restart. A faster class 4 or 6 card would reduce that time considerably.

    4-0 out of 5 stars I wish that I had noticed that it's only Class 2 memory, February 2, 2009
    I bought this memory for my HTC Touch Pro. I wanted to sync my music with windows media center and backup another USB flash drive. This card should only be used for occasional file transfers. The class 2 card is painfully slow to sync anything. I would have gladly spend more money for a faster Class 6 microSDHC card if I was paying attention at the time of purchase.

    5-0 out of 5 stars Works great in my EVO 4G, July 2, 2010
    Bought this to upgrade my EVO 4G Android smartphone and have no complaints, works perfectly. Good value for the money (and now they're even cheaper!). Note when I bought mine it was delivered directly from Amazon (which I wanted as there are counterfeit cards out there).

    4-0 out of 5 stars Roomy and fast enough, September 12, 2009
    I learned recently that all is not equal when it comes to SD storage. Some cards are far faster than others, and that can make a big difference in some applications. But this one is just sitting in my phone storing MP3s and files, and speed is never a big deal here, so it's okay that this is a middling-speed card. Plenty roomy for lots of stuff, too, at a good price.

    1-0 out of 5 stars Fake Card, November 10, 2010
    I Ordered This SD card thinking it was a great deal almost too good to be true well that's exactly what it was, I got the card and my phone (which does read SDHC cards up to 16 GB) would not read the card. I ended up buying one at Wal-mart and compared the two cards and you could clearly see that the writing was a little different on the 16gd card I'm of the strong belief that it was a counterfeit card, thank fully I got a refund on it but it took Threatening to file a A-Z report to get some action out of the seller, I will Never Buy any electronics from Amazon again this is the second time this type of thing has happened to me last time it was with a Memory Stick DUO for my PSP and that time I didn't get my money back.

    1-0 out of 5 stars FAILED after only a few uses., March 20, 2010
    I bought the SanDisk 16 GN Flash Memory card for use with my VHOLDR camera. To say that it took 3 months to fail is misleading. I only actually recorded on it a handful of times, maybe a dozen or so, before it failed. Extremely disappointed.

    5-0 out of 5 stars Great for my Blackberry 8900!, June 9, 2009
    Indeed this is a class 2 micro sd (hc) card but for syncing media and storing files on my blackberry it is perfect. Class two (2) cards are generally meant for storage and not a lot of back and forth transfers as they have a high failure rate in that scenario. However, if you are going to sync media once in a while and just update your music/podcasts/audiobooks and pictures then this card is perfect.

    It is a bit expensive...but you are getting 16gb and that is a lot of storage...all things considered.

    The packaging is in one of those foil bags and it does come with a regular SD adapter to stick into a memory card reader.

    I have used it in a Blackberry Bold and now the Blackberry 8900 and it works perfectly. I have not really noticed the speed degradation... The initial sync of all of my media (9gb) took a while...but that would take a while on anything....now with regular updates it is quick and easy and thus Highly Recommended. Read more


    19. OtterBox Defender Case for iPhone 4 (Black)
    Wireless Phone Accessory
    list price: $49.99 -- our price: Too low to display
    (price subject to change: see help)
    Asin: B003UC8RVE
    Manufacturer: Otterbox
    Sales Rank: 4
    Average Customer Review: 4.2 out of 5 stars
    US | Canada | United Kingdom | Germany | France | Japan

    Editorial Review

    Otterbox Defender Case, iPhone 4, Black ... Read more

    Reviews

    5-0 out of 5 stars Awesome case, but does add considerable bulk..., July 25, 2010
    I waited anxiously for Otterbox to release this case and ordered mine within minutes of receiving the "Defender Released" e-mail. I received the case on Friday and I must admit, it did not disappoint.

    First impressions: The case is of great quality and a lot of detail went into making it compatible with all the OEM "accessories". The holster is among the best I've seen for a phone of this size and works perfectly with the case.

    After carrying it for two days (and this is already my 3rd iPhone 4 case - I am rough on my phones): The case is without a doubt the most durable I've seen for the iPhone 4 and lives up to the reputation that Otterbox has built over the years.

    Cons: The case does add considerable bulk to the phone and may not be perfect for pocket carriers. It does include a holster which works great and can rotate for vertical or parallel carrying of the phone.


    Miscellaneous: I have no complaints really, but I am left to wonder if the silicone "flaps" that cover the earphone and USB plug-ins could have been a little more user-friendly. Sometimes they are frustrating to get back into their proper "closed" position.

    Edited one month after using: I am still extremely happy with the case. I have dropped my phones a few times already and though the case is starting to show signs the abuse I have provided it the phone still looks pristine! I opened up the case this morning to clean the phone etc and to my surprise there wasn't much to clean. With cases I've owned in the past I would have a forest of lint, dust etc. that would trap itself between the case and the phone. The Otterbox has minimized that debris!


    I am uploading several photos showing the difference between a "bare" iPhone 4 and an iPhone 4 in the Defender case so everyone can get an idea of how much "protection" and in turn "bulk" this case adds to the phone.

    Edited to add: Amazon removed my pictures when the placed the phone back in a "pre-order" status, I will re-upload them again once they allow. I'm not sure why they state "pre-order" when it should state "Back-ordered, will deliver in xx to xx weeks", but I digress.

    5-0 out of 5 stars Beauty and Protection in one Package. An improvement on earlier designs of the Defender, July 24, 2010
    Otterbox defender for my iPhone 3Gs was the best thing I ever did for that phone! It fell into and was completely submerged in a 5 gallon pot of BBQ sauce - and rinsed off with the sprayer in the sink. Phone continued to operate flawlessly!

    As soon as I bought iPhone 4 - I immediately ordered an otterbox case for it. It took over a month to arrive and when it finally did - I could immediately tell it did not offer the same amount of protection as the Otterbox for the 3Gs.

    I'm constantly fighting the rubber covering -- if I pull it out of my pocket I have to push it back into place all the way around the phone.

    The screen protector is better -- the bubbles are gone from the previous version. I like that.

    The flaps that cover the charger port and headphone jack suck! They never stay in place and to get them to lock down is a pain. Debris can easily infiltrate into the case through these openings. I find that I have to take the phone completely out of the case and clean the phone and the case more often than I ever did with the other phone/otterbox.

    Maybe they were just in a hurry to get a case that would fit the quick arrival of iPhone4. I hope the case is revamped and the thought is completed. I really need and want the kind of protection and rugged durability that the other case provided for 3Gs.

    Regardless of what I hate about this case, it's still the BEST case that you can put on the new iPhone 4 if you're hard on your phone. Just wish it was better...

    4-0 out of 5 stars Great case!, July 23, 2010
    yes, it's bulky and feels like it weighs a ton. yes, it'll make your sleek iPhone look industrial and a little clompy, kind of like Doc Martens on a ballerina. But it WILL do a superb job protecting your information and fragile screen when you drop it. And you WILL drop it, repeatedly. There are plenty of cute little lightweight cases out there but they cannot begin to offer the same level of serious protection. I don't use the clip-on 2-position holster but the design is pretty clever and it is easy to use and has a secure clip.

    I give it 4 stars because I felt the flaps could be better designed for ease of use, and hopefully will be in future versions. Some actual COLORS would be nice, too.

    3-0 out of 5 stars OK at best. . ., November 15, 2010
    I had really hoped I could stop searching when I found this Otterbox Defender for the iPhone 4, but after 2 months living with it, the search resumes.

    I have several friends that have the iPhone 3G/3Gs Defender case and they seemed pretty good. Other than the complaints about the bubbles behind the protective screen film and the hideous colors, they seemed pretty satisfied. I also saw a couple of positive reviews of this case as well when it came out, and so I bit. I've now lived with it for 2 months and am having to search for another case, and I'll explain why in a moment.

    First the good stuff.

    This is a handsome case. None of those neon colors and hideous bubbles popping out like the previous gen case. This one is clean, professional, and something that looks "right" as soon as you get it put on. It has a very nice feel in the hand, very grippy, and isn't all that heavy, considering its size. Somehow, the screen protector, which is an integral part of the case, fits on the iPhone screen perfectly and without any bubbles. I am a heavy user of my iPhone and have been known to kill the battery before noon (4 hours) some days. I've never felt that the screen was one iota less responsive to my touch than with it completely bare glass.

    The case comes in 3 parts plus a belt clip. There's a hard plastic case in two pieces, front and back, that directly contacts the phone itself and provides rigidity. Then there's a rubber sleeve that wraps tightly around the sides and back of the case in such a way that it clips into the plastic case nice and snugly. It's fairly easy to put on and remove, and you can do it without any sort of flat surface to rest on, if need be. All of the buttons are easily accessible, and the charge/sync port on the bottom, the ringer on-off switch on the side, and the headphone port on the top have rubber flaps that cover them and are easy to open and access. When all flaps are closed, the noise-canceling secondary mic on top (by the headphone port) is still left exposed by a small hole in the rubber, something that many other cases neglect. The speaker and mic ports on the bottom are completely unimpeded as well.

    It seems to provide pretty good protection from most average drops/spills. Though not waterproof, it covers most of the phone and would provide a modicum of protection from most things short of submersion.

    I am one of those who has a definite and pronounced problem with the iPhone 4 antenna reception issues. It was a huge step backwards in sensitivity for me from my 3G, and I've dropped more calls in the first month with the iPhone 4 than I did in almost 2 years with the 3G. This case definitely helps as there is no metal in the case at all, and it provides ample separation between the hand and the external antenna.

    Lastly, the belt clip is fairly clever. It is designed such that you can have the phone clipped in either screen out or screen facing in (probably safer). It also allows you to turn it 360 degrees around to find just the right angle where it's comfortable on the belt. As an added advantage, the belt clip itself can be locked to the open position in which is forms a stand for movie watching/etc. if placed on a flat surface. Clever little touch.

    The down sides.

    This is a large case. It absolutely dwarfs the iPhone 4 and completely masks its beautiful design. It will just barely fit in a men's shirt pocket and, if you have a pen also there, good luck. This also makes it like carrying around a brick (by size, not weight) in your pants pocket, should you decide to do that. Add to this the fact that the rubber backing grips so well that it usually will turn your pocket inside out and make it nearly impossible to remove while seated (say, in a car). That same rubber grippiness makes it attract dust, lint, and crud like nobody's business, though thankfully it will usually just wipe off. Also, the rubber sleeve that encases the plastic skeleton shell tends to separate very easily from the plastic shell. It is easy to snap it back into the grooves of the shell, but it's annoying nonetheless. I also found that after a month or so of use, the rubber flaps that cover the ports, especially the iPod port on the bottom, tend to get harder and harder to keep shut, and I've essentially given up on ever keeping them closed to keep dirt/dust out.

    Given the positives of having such good exposure to things like the speaker and mic ports, the case tends to attract a lot of dust and dirt into it. You'll frequently find yourself spotting specks of lint and other oddities trapped between the screen and the screen protector, making it a little annoying at times and compelling a quick disassemble and clean sequence. Also, after you've disassembled/reassembled the case a few times, the three plastic clips that clip the front and rear pieces of the case together start to get a little loose. Not dangerous, mind you, but they start creaking, for lack of a better term, such that if you pick the phone up by the corner, you notice the whole case seem to shift just a bit, sometimes making a creaking/cracking sound, that makes the case feel less than solid. Not confidence inspiring.

    The case itself forms a raised lip around the edge of the screen, with the screen essentially recessed into the case a few millimeters. That's great for protection, but it has a drawback of making it difficult to touch the corners of the touchscreen as far down as they go. Sometimes, especially for anyone with fat fingers, hitting those little icons in some programs that are nestled in the corners is a difficult task (for me, mostly when I'm one-handing it with my thumb). A minor complaint, but one worth mentioning.

    Given the difficulty with removal of the phone from the pocket, the belt clip is almost a necessity. It is for me, anyway, and I've been using it for the past 2 months. This brings me to the reason I am now in the market for a new case. The belt clip broke.

    The clip itself is the most poorly made component of the entire system. It is a relatively thin and fragile plastic piece. The belt clip itself is pretty robust, but the holster to which it connects is simply too thin to hold up. I suspected it from the start, and am frankly surprised it lasted 2 months. On the case, on the left and right sides, are small plastic squares with recesses in them. This is what the holster clips into. The design is such that the plastic holster flexes just a little and then clips a nub into that area on the iPhone case. Apparently, after 2 months of clipping the phone in and out of the holster, the holster clip broke. It broke exactly where you would expect it to, at the point of flexing to permit the case to clip into the holster. That has effectively killed the belt clip/holster functionality and forced the phone to go into my pocket, a place where it is not happy to come out of.

    I could live with the other, generally minor, shortfalls, but given how well thought out the case is overall, it seems that the belt clip was an afterthought, if a thought at all. I'm not sure if I'm going to move up level in the Otterbox line or look elsewhere. Probably the latter.

    2-0 out of 5 stars Otterbox slid backwards in quality here., October 16, 2010
    There are a lot of one star whiners out there. The new defender case does have some problems no doubt, but let's see them for what they really are. First of all, Otterbox did a great job listening to feedback on the iphone 3Gs cases.

    One: The clip for the 3Gs case was useless. It didn't hold the phone facing out, nor could you charge your phone with it in the clip. You also couldn't trust the clip to hold your phone securely. The new clip is light-years ahead of the old one in each of those departments.

    Two: The sound quality through the speaker on the old 3Gs case was hampered significantly by the dust covers in the speaker ports. Otterbox fixed this by opening up those ports altogether. Sound is better, but unfortunately this also allows more particulates into the case. You can't get something for nothing.

    Three: The air bubbles trapped in the 3Gs screen looked like trapped water, but were easily corrected with an anti glare screen in-between. However, the new case seems to have solved this issue.

    Four: Window ports seemed to have actually gotten worse, trapping even more dust than previous case.

    Five: This is where I think Otterbox really dropped the ball. The rubber skin is thinner and constantly moving out of place, everywhere you look. This thing flat out will not stay put. It was sad to see Otterbox cheapen out like that. Then you couple that with the plastic case that is the first layer of protection being thinner and flexing more than its 3Gs predecessor. Giving an overall felling of cheap dollar store products.

    It's obvious that those who would choose to add such bulk to their iphone, did it for the protection. So why not give us what we paid such an outrageous price for?

    3-0 out of 5 stars Otterbox Defender Series Case for iphone4, October 17, 2010
    The product is as advertised with one exception. The hole for the ear buds is off-set approximately one-half inch from the socket in the iphone4. When contacted Otterbox wanted labeled pictures of the unit.

    3-0 out of 5 stars Sleeker, but not as good as its predecessor, August 18, 2010
    I bought the Defender for my 3GS, and I fell in love. I forgot about the five other cases I owned before. I didn't have to worry about dropping or cleaning my phone anymore. Sure, I had to remove the dust from the camera port or wipe the screen, but there was a plastic cover over it so it's not like any damage was being done to the phone. When the Defender for the iPhone 4 was announced, it was a no-brainer to get it.

    The only major problem I had with the 3GS Defender case was that after a while, the dirt that I couldn't easily get off started to cake on it and the case started to look really dirty . This problem carries over to the new Defender, and add a few new problems. While the Defender for the iPhone 4 is a nicer design, it sacrifices protection I once had with the 3GS. Both Defender models are dust traps, but with the new Defender case, the dust ends up reaching the iPhone 4. Dust now collects around the ear piece, back camera, between the phone and screen protector, and the bottom back of the iPhone 4. These are things that never happened with the Defender for 3G/3GS because the ear piece had a small piece of fabric covering it, and the holes for the speaker were smaller, and there were rubber rings to provide a tighter connection. I can't really fault Otterbox for the back camera because of the LED flash Apple added to the phone. Placing a screen protector over the back camera and LED will cause all photos/video taken with the flash to have a blue hue.

    My final grip with the new case is that it's harder to place the rubber case over the hard case. I remember it being hard for the original Defender, but it because easy after a few times. Now that I have to take the phone out to clean it (I've learned from experience that letting dust and dirt collect on the phone while it's in a case causes it to burrow into the phone and leave divits.) putting the case back together is not easy at all. You have to use your nail to work the case around the sides and dock connector.

    I feel this case is a step back. The Defender on my 3GS made my phone look like a grenade, it provided complete coverage. I didn't have to worry about dropping it, or dirt reaching the phone. With the new Defender, I still don't worry about dropping it. Just buying a nice cloth to wipe it down. Read more


    20. Otterbox APL2-iPAD1-20-C4OTR iPad Defender Series Case
    Electronics
    list price: $89.95 -- our price: $49.99
    (price subject to change: see help)
    Asin: B003TVWNAM
    Manufacturer: Otterbox
    Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars
    US | Canada | United Kingdom | Germany | France | Japan

    Editorial Review

    Drop-proof your magical, new must-have gadget with the OtterBox Defender Series for Apple iPad! This cutting-edge case incorporates three layers of hardcore protection plus some advanced features. Stowing your iPad away for the night or for your commute? Simply remove the back polycarbonate cover and snap it over the face for ultimate touch screen protection. The built-in stand will come in handy while trying to watch a movie or video, and creates a comfortable browsing experience. When using your iPad on a flat surface, the silicone grip pads on the bottom will hold your device securely in place. We also designed this case to accommodate the optional iPad dock accessory! Take your iPad everywhere you go knowing that it is safe from the occasional drop, bump and/or scratch. ... Read more

    Reviews

    5-0 out of 5 stars OtterBox Defender Series Case for iPad -- Ultimate Protection, in Style, August 4, 2010
    After my wife bought me an iPad and I cradled its sleek aluminum and glass body in my hands, I knew that finding a protective case for it was of paramount importance. But rather than jumping into the arduous task of researching the dizzying array of available iPad cases, I already had an idea where to look: OtterBox. My wife and I have both protected our iPhone 3GS's in the company's iPhone Defender cases for over a year and have been very happy with the results. Even after numerous accidental drops, our Defender-clad iPhones look like new underneath their "armor".

    And fortunately, a quick check of the OtterBox web site revealed that the company did, in fact, offer a Defender series case for the iPad. Nearly ninety bucks and just over a week later, I am happy to report that OtterBox's Defender case for iPad is everything I had hoped it would be. At $89.95, this case is certainly one of the more expensive iPad case options available, but in my opinion, it is well worth the investment. I do have a minor quibble with the included instructions, but it is far outweighed by the product's overall quality, sheer durability, and style.

    Contents:
    The iPad Defender product includes a black high-impact polycarbonate shell, a separate black polycarbonate shield, a silicone outer skin, and a self-adhesive protective film. Other items include a microfiber cleaning cloth and a stiff scraper tool for applying the protective film to your iPad screen.

    Packaging:
    After opening the box, you find your Defender case nestled in a recyclable cardboard tray, along with a packet containing instructions and the other items included with the product. The utilitarian packaging does not quite provide the unboxing experience you'd have with an Apple product, but it suits its purpose well. Fortunately, the packaging is devoid of any unnecessary plastic or other packing material, so it's as environmentally friendly as possible.

    Instructions:
    Rather than providing written instructions in English and other languages, OtterBox included numbered illustrations printed inside the packet. One set of instructions illustrates how to apply the protective film, while another set illustrates how to remove the silicone skin, open the case, install the iPad, and close the whole thing back up again nice and snug. The packet also includes illustrated instructions for the company's other iPad case (the Commuter series), but they are clearly labeled as such and will hopefully not confuse any Defender purchasers. I really wish OtterBox had also provided written step-by-step Defender installation instructions, instead of relying solely on illustrations. Even well-executed illustrations (which these certainly are) can sometimes be difficult to understand, and I feel that even a sentence or two for each illustration could have provided better clarity. A web URL printed inside the packet gave me hope that more detailed instructions could be found on the OtterBox web site, but unfortunately the instructions for the iPad Defender case were not yet available on that web page at the time of this review. I'm certain that OtterBox will be rectifying this issue soon.

    Installation:
    By far, the most tedious part of installing this case is applying the self-adhesive protective film to your iPad's screen. The illustrated instructions do a fair job of expressing the necessary steps, but the film application could really be helped by accompanying written steps. As I applied the protective film along with its backing and used the scraper tool to smooth out bubbles, I started to get worried because the tool seemed to snag a few times, causing some small kinks which only got worse as I continued trying to gently scrape them to the edge. Fortunately, once I removed the backing from the protective film, I found that the kinks were not in the film itself, but rather in the disposable backing. Whew! The protective film ended up looking nearly perfect on my iPad screen. Removing the silicone skin, opening the polycarbonate case, inserting the iPad, and closing it all up again proved to be much easier.

    Product Use:
    First and foremost, the Defender case seems to achieve its primary purpose -- protecting your iPad -- very well. When you're not using the iPad, you should clip the polycarbonate shield over the iPad screen to provide maximum protection. The shield grips the edges of the case snugly, to help ensure that it doesn't inadvertently get knocked off. And when you're actually using your iPad, the shield has a retractable built-in stand which will set your iPad at a nice viewing angle for desktop or tabletop use. Or if you don't need the stand and want to hold the iPad while using it, you can simply clip the shield to the back of the case. Doing so will add a little more heft to an already-hefty iPad and case, so you can also just leave the shield off during handheld use as well. To help protect the various iPad ports, the case features integrated silicone plugs which are easy to open and close as necessary. The case also includes a removable access door to allow you to charge your iPad or mount it in a standard iPad dock. However, I did not test the iPad dock capability for this review.

    Style:
    Let's face it -- you're not going to buy this case because you're fashion-conscious. You're going to buy it because you (like me) want to provide the very best protection for your iPad, without locking it a vault. That notwithstanding, the OtterBox Defender case for iPad is still an attractive case. The iPad Defender is an imposing-but-stylish black polycarbonate and silicone suit of armor which, like its iPhone 3GS Defender little brother, provides a round protected window on the case's backside to clearly display the Apple logo. When the removable shield is used as a iPad stand, four small black silicone pads provide a secure footing on smooth surfaces. Both the silicone skin and the polycarbonate shield feature subtle checkering at the top and bottom edges to improve grip -- a nice touch.

    Summary:
    The Defender for iPad is likely the best protective case you can get under a hundred bucks. I already feel more comfortable lugging my iPad around, knowing that it will be able to stand up to just about anything I can throw at it (figuratively speaking, of course). With the Defender series case for iPad, OtterBox seems to have covered the bases quite well, offering a well-rounded combination of protection and stylishness.

    4-0 out of 5 stars Rock solid protection, but with annoying downside., August 30, 2010
    Let me start by saying that this is really a quality product. It feels very solid and ipad feels very secure in it. The fit is also excellent and the screen protector it comes with is good value. It feels like I have a one of those rugged laptops that you can abuse. I took it camping and felt at ease that no harm would come to my ipad. I also felt like that I didn't need to baby my ipad.

    Now the problem with this is that this protection will make the ipad feel bulky and a little heavy espically if you are using it as ebook reader. One must keep this in mind. It's all about balancing protection and comfort. This case is definitely more towards the protection end.

    The downside of this case is that the snap-off access for optional iPad dock doesn't come with a opening and closing flap for just the port itself.

    Everytime one has to charge the ipad, the cover needs to be removed by sliding it out. This becomes annoying after awhile. This leaves an area of the ipad exposed if it happens to fall. Also, even though there is a felt lining inside the cover, I feel sometimes that there is plastic to ipad contact. I need to put it back on slower so it just touches the felt. Why do I do I need to slide it off everytime when I just need access to the port?

    5-0 out of 5 stars Awesome case, worth every penny, July 14, 2010
    I have used the Otterbox on my iPhone - and loved it. I was looking forward to a similar experience with the iPad. The installation of the screen protector was difficult to understand and difficult to complete - I could not get rid of the bubbles - the tool provided also scratched the protector.

    I used a third party screen protector in the end.

    5-0 out of 5 stars Best Case for the iPad, September 13, 2010
    I am the type of person who believes every gadget should have adequate protection...at least from my clumsy hands :). I had an Otterbox case years ago for my BB Pearl and remembered they were a good brand. Before buying the case, I used one of those silicon rubber cases that only protects the back and sides (barely) that I purchased with the iPad for $40. A few months later I tried a folio-type case, but it was too obstructive. After a few returns to Best Buy, I finally waited somewhat patiently for this case.

    People who criticize the iPad for it's price are crazy, because I've paid $40 for a case that offers 1/8 of the protection the Otterbox provides. I thought it was a steal for $50 bucks, considering it MSRP's for $90.

    I will admit, the Otterbox is one beastly case, but I am a big guy so lugging an extra 1-1/2 pounds is nothing. I can see how some people, primarily women, are turned off by the case. It isn't attractive, either, so stylistas beware. I love the fact I can cover the screen when not in use, and that the stand lets me watch movies while sitting on an airplane.

    Before buying the case, I used an InvisiShield for the screen only, which was a huge mistake. The texture on the protector was awful, whereas the Otterbox screen guard felt natural, comparable to the iPad's original surface.

    I'm not the best person at putting things together, hence having a couple screws left over from my Ikea furniture, but the Otterbox was easy to take on and off. Again, nothing too complicated, just take your time and do it right the first time. Dust clings to the iPad like a magnet, so use compressed air to remove the particles before sliding it in. The silicon tabs are a P.I.A., but work your way around the chassis slowly for maximum results.

    The only complaint about the case is it is a dust magnet. The silicon on the back collects debris like crazy - dust, hair, dirt, etc add up quickly. Keeping the front cover on the back helps eliminate it slightly, but then dust just collects around the edge of the screen. No solution thus far except for a mildly wet cloth.

    Unlike other idiots out there, I haven't tried to test the limits of the Otterbox, so I cannot tell you if it protects it from a fall. Based on my usage, it could withstand a fall from the bed or desk onto carpeting. Tile, which I have, tends to break electronics faster than other surfaces, but it MIGHT be safe. Dropping it from higher places may or may not be covered. (i.e. if it fell from a counter). I seriously watched someone try to purposely ruin their gadgets over on Engadget - what were they thinking?
    Here is who I think will LOVE the iPad:

    True Geeks, because they usually value durability over aesthetics.
    Field Workers, because this case is ready for action despite the conditions.
    Average People, who want to protect their $499 to $829 investment.
    Parents, because the Otterbox protects the iPad from your kids sticky/dirty mitts. Businessmen, because the iPad stores nicely in a messenger bag while traveling.

    Here's who I think should avoid the Otterbox (and sacrifice protection):

    Anyone with a sense of fashion, as this isn't the prettiest case I've seen
    People who think the iPad is too heavy, as this case adds a good 20 ounces to the bulk
    Cautious people who can take care of their gadgets without needing a security blanket

    The Otterbox Defender for iPad isn't right for everyone, but IT IS the best case available. In the end, looks and aesthetics outweigh practicality, durability, and safety.

    5-0 out of 5 stars OtterBox Defender Series Case for iPad -- Ultimate Protection, in Style, August 20, 2010
    This is the best iPad case on the market, period. Believe me, I've owned many, from the Apple case to various jackets, to the full fold over leather belkin-type cases (it was somewhat of an addiction there for awhile). Most folks are aware of the quality of Otterboxes other products, and this one really steps it up a notch. Otterbox was a little late in hitting the market with the case and so I dont think very many iPad owners are aware that this is out there. I also haven't seen it in many stores as of this posting either. I'm not sure if it's the higher price point or what. Regardless, this case has saved my iPad from certain demise more than once already. The snap front, which also doubles as a stand, makes this all worth having. Yes, it does add a little more bulk and weight, but it's quickly forgotten when you start to use it. The concave nature of how the case fits in your hand is a welcome addition. Also, the rubber grippy-ness helps to make sure you don't wing your iPad at a co-worker when you pull it out quickly to take notes. I couldn't be happier with the case. The only two minor gripes I have (and I stress "minor) are that the back fitting that has to be removed to charge is somewhat difficult to get off and on at first. However, it soon loosens up to the point where snapping and unsnapping is a breeze. That being said, that also makes me a little concerned that it will one day loosen to the point where it just falls off (still yet to be seen). The other (again minor) thing I would like to point out is that not all peripherals fit into the headphone slot. For example, I use my iPad as a navigation system. The auxiliary cord that I use is too chubby to fit through the case and into the hole (not unlike the problems people are reporting with the iPhone 4 Bumper). That said, I wouldn't trade this case for anything else on the market right now. Spend the extra dough and invest in one of these. For the money it's worth it!

    5-0 out of 5 stars Perfect protection for your new iPad!, July 16, 2010
    I've had this case for a week now and now I can add my review. I'm completely satisfied with this Otterbox case. Like most of all iPad owners I've searched for the perfect protection for it. I was this close to purchase the ZooGue case but finally decided not to, and I'm glad I went for the Defender case. The reason? I'm not the only user for my iPad: it's that simple. If no one else uses your iPad you can go with a leather case, a sleeve and so on, but if your family members use your iPad too, then you have no other option but to invest in good protection, specially if you have kids. There's no way a leather case can provide good protection all around the corners, for example.
    It's not difficult to assemble, it just takes a little patience and a few minutes to first apply the screen shield AND THEN slide the iPad into the lower part of the case; you then slide in the top half of the case until it clicks closed, and finally attach the silicone wrap for shock absorption.
    So if you can predict that your iPad will exchange many hands then you can presume that nobody will take care of it like you do, and then a case like the Otterbox Defender is mandatory.
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