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    $139.00
    1. Kindle Wireless Reading Device,
    $189.00
    2. Kindle 3G Wireless Reading Device,
    $189.00
    3. Kindle 3G Wireless Reading Device,
    $19.99
    4. Scotch Thermal Laminator 15.5
    $379.00
    5. Kindle DX Wireless Reading Device,
    $89.99
    6. Canon PIXMA MG5220 Wireless Inkjet
    $49.00
    7. Canon PIXMA MP495 Wireless Inkjet
    $5.75
    8. Dimple Green Laser Pen Astronomy
    $91.99
    9. VuPoint Solutions Magic Wand Portable
    $69.99
    10. Canon SELPHY CP800 Black Compact
    $48.56
    11. Panasonic KX-TG6512B DECT 6.0
    $85.05
    12. Wolverine F2D 35mm Film to Digital
    Too low to display
    13. Vtech DECT 6.0 Expandable 2-Handset
    $129.99
    14. Canon PIXMA MX870 Wireless Office
    $64.99
    15. Fellowes Powershred W-11C Cross-Cut
    $6.99
    16. 50mw 532nm Astronomy Powerful
    $122.28
    17. Panasonic KX-TG6545B DECT 6.0
    $99.84
    18. Pandigital Photolink One-Touch
    $186.95
    19. Canon CanoScan 9000F Color Image
    $0.01
    20. BT-446 BP-446 Cordless phone battery

    1. Kindle Wireless Reading Device, Wi-Fi, Graphite, 6" Display with New E Ink Pearl Technology
    Electronics
    list price: $139.00 -- our price: $139.00
    (price subject to change: see help)
    Asin: B002Y27P3M
    Manufacturer: Amazon.com
    Sales Rank: 2
    Average Customer Review: 4.4 out of 5 stars
    US | Canada | United Kingdom | Germany | France | Japan

    Editorial Review

    The all-new Kindle has a new electronic-ink screen with 50 percent better contrast than any other e-reader, a new sleek design with a 21 percent smaller body while still keeping the same 6-inch-size reading area, and a 17 percent lighter weight at just 8.5 ounces.The new Kindle also offers 20 percent faster page turns, up to one month of battery life, double the storage to 3,500 books, built-in Wi-Fi, a graphite color option and more—all for only $139. ... Read more

    Reviews

    5-0 out of 5 stars Kindle vs. Nook (updated 12/1/2010), August 28, 2010
    If you're trying to choose between a Nook and a Kindle, perhaps I can help. My wife and I have owned a Nook (the original one, not the new Nook Color), a Kindle 2, and a Kindle DX. When Amazon announced the Kindle 3 this summer, we pre-ordered two Kindle 3's: the wi-fi only model in graphite, and the wi-fi + 3G model in white. They arrived in late August and we have used them very regularly since then. For us, Kindle is better than Nook, but Nook is a good device with its own advantages that I will discuss below. I'll end this review with a few words about the Nook Color.

    First, reasons why we prefer the Kindle:

    * Speed

    In our experience, the Kindle is very zippy compared to the Nook. Page refresh speed (the time it takes a new page to appear after you push the page-turn button) was WAY quicker on Kindle 2 than on Nook, and it's quicker yet on Kindle 3. Yet, I read a whole book on the Nook and didn't find the slower page refresh to be annoying - you get used to it, and it's not a problem.

    For me, the more important speed difference concerns navigation - moving the cursor around the screen, for example to pick a book from your library, or to jump to a chapter by selecting it in the table of contents. On Kindle, you do this by pushing a 5-way rocker button, and the cursor moves very quickly. On Nook, you do this by activating the color LCD touchscreen (which normally shuts off when not in use, to conserve battery). A "virtual rocker button" appears on the screen, and you touch it to move the cursor. Unfortunately, the Nook cursor moves very sluggishly. This might not be a big deal to you, but it really got annoying to me, especially since my wife's Kindle was so quick and responsive.

    In November 2010, Nook got a software upgrade that increases page refresh speed and makes navigation more responsive. I returned my Nook months ago, so I cannot tell you if the Nook's performance is now equal to the Kindle's, but Nook owners in the comments section have convinced me that the software update improves the experience of using the Nook. If performance is a big factor in your decision, visit a Best Buy and compare Kindle and Nook side by side.

    * Screen contrast

    You've seen Amazon's claims that the Kindle 3 e-ink has 50% better contrast than Kindle 2 or other e-ink devices. I have no way of precisely measuring the improvement in contrast, but I can tell you that the Kindle 3 display definitely has more contrast than Kindle 2 or Nook. The difference is noticeable, and important: more screen contrast means less eyestrain when reading in poorly lit rooms.

    In well-lit rooms, the Nook and Kindle 2 have enough contrast to allow for comfortable reading. But I often read in low-light conditions, like in bed at night, or in a poorly lit room. In these situations, reading on Nook or Kindle 2 was a bit uncomfortable and often gave me a mild headache. When I got the Kindle 3, the extra contrast was immediately noticeable, and made it more comfortable to read under less-than-ideal lighting conditions. (If you go with a Nook, just make sure you have a good reading lamp nearby.)

    * Battery life

    The Nook's color LCD touch screen drains its battery quickly - I could never get more than 5 days out of a charge. The Kindle 2 had longer battery life than the Nook, and Kindle 3 has even longer life: in the 3 months since we received our Kindle 3's, we typically get 3 weeks of battery life between charges. (We keep wireless off about half the time to save battery power.)

    * Weight

    Nook weighs about 3 ounces more than the new Kindle, and you can really feel the difference. Without a case, Nook is still light enough to hold in one hand for long reading sessions without fatigue. But in a case, Nook is a heavy sucker. The new Kindle 3 is so light, even in a case, we find it comfortable holding in one hand for long reading sessions.

    Reasons some people might prefer the Nook:

    * In-store experience

    If you need help with your nook, you can take it to any barnes and noble and get a real human to help. You can take your nook into the coffee shop section of your local B&N store and read any book for free for up to one hour per day. When you take your nook to B&N, some in-store special deals and the occasional free book pop up on your screen.

    * User-replaceable battery

    Rechargeable batteries eventually lose their ability to hold a charge. Nook's battery is user-replaceable and relatively inexpensive. To replace Kindle's battery, Amazon wants you to ship your Kindle to Amazon, and they will ship you back a DIFFERENT Kindle than the one you sent (it's the same model, for example if you send a white Kindle 3, you get a white Kindle 3 back, but you get a "refurbished" one, NOT the exact one you sent them). I don't like this at all.

    However, several people have posted comments here that have eased my concerns. Someone looked up statistics on the Kindle's battery and did some simple calculations to show that it should last for 3 or more years. Before that happens, I will surely have upgraded to a newer Kindle model by then. Also, someone found some companies that sell Kindle batteries at reasonable cost and have how-to videos that demonstrate how we can replace the battery ourselves. Doing this would void the Kindle's warranty, but the battery will probably not fail until long after the warranty expires.

    * ePub

    Nook uses the ePub format, a widely used open format. Amazon uses a proprietary ebook format. Many libraries will "lend" ebooks in the ePub format, which works with nook but not kindle. However, a free and reputable program called Calibre allows you to translate ebooks from one format to another - it supports many formats, including ePub and Kindle. The only catch is that it doesn't work with copy-protected ebooks, so you can't, for example, buy a Kindle book (which is copy protected) and translate it to ePub so you can read it on a Nook.

    * lending e-books to friends

    Nook owners can "loan" ebooks they purchased to other nook owners for up to two weeks. You can't do this with kindle - yet. Amazon has announced it will soon add this lending feature to all kindles (via a software update that will be available to people who already own kindles).

    * Nook's color LCD touchscreen

    This could be a pro or con, depending on your preferences. It makes nook hipper and less drab than kindle. Some people enjoy using the color LCD to view their library or navigate. I did, at first. But after two weeks of use, and comparisons with my wife's kindle, I found the dedicated buttons of the kindle easier and far quicker to use than the nook's color touchscreen. I also found the bright light from the color screen distracting when I was trying to read a book or newspaper (though when not in use, it shuts off after a minute or so to conserve battery).

    * expandable capacity

    Nook comes with 2GB of internal memory. If you need more capacity, you can insert a microSD card to add up to 16GB more memory. Kindle comes with 4GB of internal memory - twice as much as Nook - but there's no way to expand that. Kindle doesn't accept memory cards of any type. If you mainly use your device to read ebooks and newspapers, this shouldn't be an issue. I have over 100 books on my Kindle, and I've used only a tiny fraction of the memory. Once Kindle's memory fills up, just delete books you don't need immediate access to; you can always restore them later, in seconds, for free.

    A few other notes:

    Kindle and Nook have other features, such as an MP3 player and a web browser, but I caution you to have low expectations for these features. The MP3 player on the Kindle is like the first-generation iPod shuffle - you can't see what song is playing, and you can't navigate to other songs on your device. I don't like the browser on either device; e-ink is just not a good technology for surfing the web; it's slower and clunkier than LCD screen technology, so even the browser on an Android phone or iPod touch is more enjoyable to use. However, some commenters have more favorable views of either device's browser, and you might, too.

    * PDF support

    Kindle and Nook both handle PDF files, but in different ways. When you put a PDF file on your nook, nook converts it into an ebook-like file, then you can adjust the font size, and the text and pagination will adjust just like with any ebook. But you cannot see the original PDF file in the native format in which it was created. Kindle 3 and Kindle DX have native support for PDF files. You can see PDF files just as they would appear on your computer. You can also convert PDF files to an ebook-like format, and then Kindle handles them just the way the Nook handles them - text and pagination adjust when you change the font size. Unfortunately, some symbols, equations, and graphics get lost or mangled in the translation - even when viewing PDF files in their native format on the Kindle. Moreover, the small screen size of the Kindle 3 and the Nook is not great for PDF files, most of which are designed for a larger page size. You can zoom and pan, but this is cumbersome and tiresome. Thanks to commenters who suggested viewing PDF files in landscape mode on the Kindle (I don't know if you can do this on Nook); this way, you can see the entire top half of the page without panning, and then scroll down to the bottom half. This works a little better.

    SUMMARY:

    Nook and Kindle each offer their own advantages. We like the nook's user-replaceable battery, compatibility with ePub format, and in-store experience. But we strongly prefer Kindle 3 because its performance is zippier, its higher-contrast screen is easier to read, and it's smaller and lighter so it is more portable and more comfortable to hold in one hand for long reading sessions.

    * Nook Color

    Everything I wrote about the Nook in this review applies to the original Nook (which continues to be available), not the new Nook Color. To me, the Nook Color is in a different product category than the Kindle or original Nook. Nook Color has an LCD screen, like an iPad or most computer monitors. Reading on a computer screen for long periods of time is not comfortable for me - it causes fatigue and headaches. The e-ink Kindle is very comfortable for long reading sessions. So I'll take a pass on the Nook Color. But it will probably be great for others, especially people who want to watch movies, surf the web and play games on their e-reader, and don't mind the extra cost, weight, or lack of 3G. I've seen and played with a Nook Color at my local B&N, and it is a very attractive device. I'm looking forward to reading user reviews of the Nook Color when people start getting them. If you get one, please post a comment to let us know how you like it.

    3-0 out of 5 stars Worth the money. Not perfect, but very very good for start to finish novels in good light, August 31, 2010
    I woke up to a nice surprise this morning: a new kindle as a gift. I have an iPad and a Kindle DX, but I guess someone heard my complaints of them being too heavy and difficult to do extended-reading on. Don't get me wrong, I absolutely love my iPad and DX, but this new generation of Kindle is perfect for reading outside and for long periods of time. The iPad gets completely washed out in sunlight and often irritates my eyes staring at it for more than a couple of hours. The DX was my go-to device for those extended/outdoor reading periods, but now I have a new friend for reading novels. Instead of a replacement, this one seems more like a companion to the other devices and is a different class. The iPad works great for web browsing, shopping, productivity, games, etc while the Kindle falls short in those areas. The Kindle works great for reading novels, where the iPad falls short. For those that love to do extended-reading of magazines, newspapers, research articles, etc, I find that the DX is the go-to device.

    Without a doubt, the size and weight of the new kindle is the biggest draw for me. It's smaller than the last edition by a significant margin. I've played around with the Kindle 2 and was impressed, but now looking at the size of the new Kindle, I'm blown away. It's the absolute perfect size. Smaller would be unmanageable and larger wouldn't feel nearly as good. This is a device that you can hold up, read, and just forget that it's there. Compared to other e-readers I've tried, it's much smaller and much lighter.

    One of my biggest complaints about the previous generation Kindles and the DX is the speed. It sometimes takes a while after you push `next page' for it to actually change. In addition, the web browsing feature was so slow and clunky that it is really unusable in my opinion. Two additions to the new Kindle have helped attenuate these issues. First, the pages do flip quicker (albeit, still slow in my opinion), and the addition of wifi has allowed faster connection for wireless activities (much better than only relying on 3G). I still can't see myself using the Kindle as an internet browsing tool or really doing much online aside from purchasing reading material, but the faster connection at least opens up the possibility - something that would only frustrate me on previous editions.

    The new Kindle also offers a better contrast than previous editions and it looks fantastic compared to every other e-reader I have seen. I have no trouble seeing the screen in dim light or in bright sunlight - it really opens up the ability to read almost anywhere you are. Of course, you'll still need a separate light for extremely dark areas.

    Another big addition to the Kindle 3 is that it offers double the storage compared to Kindle 2. I've never had a problem with the amount of storage since I can't possibly see myself filling up that much space (I don't put mp3's on it), but perhaps in the future, if certain applications or media files are put on the kindle, it could have been a problem. The additional space in the new model is definitely a welcome addition, but bringing back the memory card slot that was included on Kindle 1 would have been an even more welcome addition in my opinion.

    Among e-readers, I definitely recommend the Kindle 3 if not just because it has a better size/form-factor, contrast, battery life, and speed compared to every other e-reader I have tried. On top of that, you get the wonderful amazon buying experience and selection for all your literature and can keep your kindle library intact between whatever other device you want to download a Kindle application onto.

    The question of whether you need a Kindle vs another type of device for reading becomes a little more tricky and really comes down to what you want to use it for.

    Do you want a device to read novels on, perhaps read outside, and have something very light that you almost forget it's there? Buy the Kindle.

    Do you want something to lie in bed with for short periods of time while surfing the web? I might suggest going with the iPad, a different tablet, or a netbook.

    Do you already have a Kindle 1 or 2? That's a tough one.... I don't think the new edition has enough `new' to it to warrant the upgrade in my mind, but some might value the new size and wifi capabilities even more-so than I do. For me, the new Kindle was a welcome addition to my family of devices since I didn't have anything anywhere near its form factor and convenience.

    Should you get 3G + Wifi or just Wifi? I think this question can be answered simply by asking yourself if you travel a lot. Being able to buy books and access wireless content on the road is an indispensable option and well worth the extra money in my mind. Keeping the device mainly at home or near wifi hotspots really negates the need for 3G though.

    Overall, I have to give the Kindle a 5 star rating because it does what it was designed to do very well, and in my opinion better than any of the competition. While the new features and capabilities aren't game-changing and truly outstanding, it is smaller, more capable, and better than any other e-reader out there. If you want `one device to handle it all', this isn't the place to look, but If you want a fantastic device solely for reading books, this is what you want.

    5-0 out of 5 stars A hesistant buyer rejoices on his choice, September 2, 2010
    When I first unboxed the new K3, I was slightly disappointed. The new 5-way appeared to be harder to used than the little joystick of the K2. I have to say, though, two days later, I'm liking it much better. Since I'm getting used to it so quickly, I think in another day I won't know the difference.

    The size is absolutely perfect. In the Amazon cover, it is exactly like reading from a paperback book. It's noticeably lighter and easier to hold for reading, even with arthritis in my hands. The page turn buttons are wonderful. Almost no noise, and you don't have to push them as hard. It should make it much easier for those with weak or disabled hands. I also like have next page and previous buttons on both sides. I didn't think it would make a difference to me, but it really does.

    I tried a couple of times to connect the WiFi, but didn't get it to work. Today I had more time so I thought I'd try to puzzle through it. But when I navigated to the wireless menu, it had somehow figured out how to connect on its own. The browser is MUCH faster, and it made buying a book a breeze.

    I haven't had it long enough to comment on the extended battery life. But I was honestly fine with the more than 10 days I always got with K2.

    And the FONTS! My word what a difference! I can practically read in the dark! I've been able to reduce the font size from 4 to 2. Combine sharper contrast with better fonts and it's an unbeatable combo.

    The ONLY thing I would change if I could is to move the Menu button, and especially the Back button. I'm having a little trouble navigating with the down arrow because I hit Back. But I'm starting to get the hang of it.

    All in all, I think Amazon hit it out of the park with the K3!

    5-0 out of 5 stars K3 Even Better than its Predecessor, August 28, 2010
    It's no longer necessary to write about how desirable the Kindle is (or, for that matter, e-readers generally). Books and text and reading are with us to stay; only paper is becoming unnecessary. What we can discuss is how well a device performs its intended task(s), and how it compares to its competition on an absolute basis and for the price.

    My wife and I share a last gen 6" Kindle and just received a new 6" display K3. I know, Amazon doesn't call it that, but how else can users refer to it? In twenty words or less, it is an improvement over an already excellent product. Smaller, but not too small to be held comfortably. Same size display, but sharper and crisper, better contrast. Easy to use, somewhat smaller keyboard that takes a little, but very little, getting used to. It took me a few hours to stop accidentally pressing some neighboring keys, but now using the keyboard is second nature. And the page turning buttons are silent, but have sufficient tactile feedback, excellent feel.

    I found it very easy to duplicate our library from our older Kindle to our new K3, and to activate our home wifi. I don't like to say I "transferred" our books because that could be understood to mean they were taken from our old Kindle to our new one. I say "duplicate" because they reside on both Kindles. The instruction manual is detailed and somewhat lengthy, but very understandable. (It's 200 pages, but don't let that scare you; it's easy to find the parts you need, and you will never need more than a few pages at one time.) The manual is published on the device, as in the past, and can also be downloaded to your computer as a pdf file so you can read the instructions from your computer as you apply them to the K3.

    If you have wifi at home, which we do, when you are in range of a wifi that you have activated in your K3, it automatically uses that wifi, instead of connecting to the 3G AT&T network, assuming, of course, you have a 3G+wifi K3. It works faster on my home wifi than on the 3G network, so much so that if I had really thought it through before I bought it, or if I were to buy another, I would probably go wifi only and save $50. The only reasons to get the 3G+wifi model would seem to be if you don't have reliable access to wifi or if you travel a good deal to places that don't have a lot of wifi access, but do have AT&T connectivity AND you have need to download books or periodicals on a regular basis or without delay while you are away from home or office. If you can plan ahead and stock up on a few good books, and you have reliable access to wifi, such as at home/office, McDonalds or Starbucks, I suggest you think twice about whether you want the 3G+wifi K3, or the wifi only.

    Each K3 has its own email address and you can send documents to it, including Word and pdf docs, and photos. Of course, the photos are B&W, but very detailed and clear. The K3 permits surfing the web, although I haven't used it much for that purpose and, other than saying it works, I hesitate to pass judgment on how well I think someone who uses it for web browsing would like it.

    I can't compare it to other dedicated e-readers because I haven't used them. People seem to be interested in how I think it compares to the iPad, which I don't own but have "played with" somewhat extensively at the Apple Store. My assessment is that there is no comparison. The iPad will do much more, but as an e-reader I think the K3 is superior. I don't need color for reading text, the K3 is a fraction of the cost, and its smaller size makes it much more convenient to tote around. However, what kills the iPad as an e-reader, as far as I am concerned, is its weight. I suspect most of us are the same in this regard, but I tend to read for an hour or two at a stretch. A pound and a half doesn't sound too heavy, but I held an iPad for five minutes, literally, and my hands ached. It is simply too heavy to use as a book reading device, while the K3 is light as a feather. For reading, a cheaper and significantly lighter K3 as a dedicated e-reader is, IMHO, the way to go (compared to an iPad). BTW, a recent (in Aug. 2010) report from Taiwan said Apple in making a 6" iPod, which, depending on size and weight, could change the equation. It will be interesting to see how the e-reader market develops. I said I can't compare the K3 to other competitors, and I won't, but I can say I am completely satisfied with Amazon as an e-book seller. I've only had a few occasions to need support (on my old Kindle), but that has also been entirely satisfactory.

    Bottom line: my wife and I both like the K3 very much and recommend it to anyone considering buying an e-reader. I don't think you will regret buying one, with or without the free 3G.

    5-0 out of 5 stars Kindle vs. Nook (updated 12/1/2010), August 28, 2010
    If you're trying to choose between a Nook and a Kindle, perhaps I can help. My wife and I have owned a Nook (the original one, not the new Nook Color), a Kindle 2, and a Kindle DX. When Amazon announced the Kindle 3 this summer, we pre-ordered two Kindle 3's: the wi-fi only model in graphite, and the wi-fi + 3G model in white. They arrived in late August and we have used them very regularly since then. For us, Kindle is better than Nook, but Nook is a good device with its own advantages that I will discuss below. I'll end this review with a few words about the Nook Color.

    First, reasons why we prefer the Kindle:

    * Speed

    In our experience, the Kindle is very zippy compared to the Nook. Page refresh speed (the time it takes a new page to appear after you push the page-turn button) was WAY quicker on Kindle 2 than on Nook, and it's quicker yet on Kindle 3. Yet, I read a whole book on the Nook and didn't find the slower page refresh to be annoying - you get used to it, and it's not a problem.

    For me, the more important speed difference concerns navigation - moving the cursor around the screen, for example to pick a book from your library, or to jump to a chapter by selecting it in the table of contents. On Kindle, you do this by pushing a 5-way rocker button, and the cursor moves very quickly. On Nook, you do this by activating the color LCD touchscreen (which normally shuts off when not in use, to conserve battery). A "virtual rocker button" appears on the screen, and you touch it to move the cursor. Unfortunately, the Nook cursor moves very sluggishly. This might not be a big deal to you, but it really got annoying to me, especially since my wife's Kindle was so quick and responsive.

    In November 2010, Nook got a software upgrade that increases page refresh speed and makes navigation more responsive. I returned my Nook months ago, so I cannot tell you if the Nook's performance is now equal to the Kindle's, but Nook owners in the comments section have convinced me that the software update improves the experience of using the Nook. If performance is a big factor in your decision, visit a Best Buy and compare Kindle and Nook side by side.

    * Screen contrast

    You've seen Amazon's claims that the Kindle 3 e-ink has 50% better contrast than Kindle 2 or other e-ink devices. I have no way of precisely measuring the improvement in contrast, but I can tell you that the Kindle 3 display definitely has more contrast than Kindle 2 or Nook. The difference is noticeable, and important: more screen contrast means less eyestrain when reading in poorly lit rooms.

    In well-lit rooms, the Nook and Kindle 2 have enough contrast to allow for comfortable reading. But I often read in low-light conditions, like in bed at night, or in a poorly lit room. In these situations, reading on Nook or Kindle 2 was a bit uncomfortable and often gave me a mild headache. When I got the Kindle 3, the extra contrast was immediately noticeable, and made it more comfortable to read under less-than-ideal lighting conditions. (If you go with a Nook, just make sure you have a good reading lamp nearby.)

    * Battery life

    The Nook's color LCD touch screen drains its battery quickly - I could never get more than 5 days out of a charge. The Kindle 2 had longer battery life than the Nook, and Kindle 3 has even longer life: in the 3 months since we received our Kindle 3's, we typically get 3 weeks of battery life between charges. (We keep wireless off about half the time to save battery power.)

    * Weight

    Nook weighs about 3 ounces more than the new Kindle, and you can really feel the difference. Without a case, Nook is still light enough to hold in one hand for long reading sessions without fatigue. But in a case, Nook is a heavy sucker. The new Kindle 3 is so light, even in a case, we find it comfortable holding in one hand for long reading sessions.

    Reasons some people might prefer the Nook:

    * In-store experience

    If you need help with your nook, you can take it to any barnes and noble and get a real human to help. You can take your nook into the coffee shop section of your local B&N store and read any book for free for up to one hour per day. When you take your nook to B&N, some in-store special deals and the occasional free book pop up on your screen.

    * User-replaceable battery

    Rechargeable batteries eventually lose their ability to hold a charge. Nook's battery is user-replaceable and relatively inexpensive. To replace Kindle's battery, Amazon wants you to ship your Kindle to Amazon, and they will ship you back a DIFFERENT Kindle than the one you sent (it's the same model, for example if you send a white Kindle 3, you get a white Kindle 3 back, but you get a "refurbished" one, NOT the exact one you sent them). I don't like this at all.

    However, several people have posted comments here that have eased my concerns. Someone looked up statistics on the Kindle's battery and did some simple calculations to show that it should last for 3 or more years. Before that happens, I will surely have upgraded to a newer Kindle model by then. Also, someone found some companies that sell Kindle batteries at reasonable cost and have how-to videos that demonstrate how we can replace the battery ourselves. Doing this would void the Kindle's warranty, but the battery will probably not fail until long after the warranty expires.

    * ePub

    Nook uses the ePub format, a widely used open format. Amazon uses a proprietary ebook format. Many libraries will "lend" ebooks in the ePub format, which works with nook but not kindle. However, a free and reputable program called Calibre allows you to translate ebooks from one format to another - it supports many formats, including ePub and Kindle. The only catch is that it doesn't work with copy-protected ebooks, so you can't, for example, buy a Kindle book (which is copy protected) and translate it to ePub so you can read it on a Nook.

    * lending e-books to friends

    Nook owners can "loan" ebooks they purchased to other nook owners for up to two weeks. You can't do this with kindle - yet. Amazon has announced it will soon add this lending feature to all kindles (via a software update that will be available to people who already own kindles).

    * Nook's color LCD touchscreen

    This could be a pro or con, depending on your preferences. It makes nook hipper and less drab than kindle. Some people enjoy using the color LCD to view their library or navigate. I did, at first. But after two weeks of use, and comparisons with my wife's kindle, I found the dedicated buttons of the kindle easier and far quicker to use than the nook's color touchscreen. I also found the bright light from the color screen distracting when I was trying to read a book or newspaper (though when not in use, it shuts off after a minute or so to conserve battery).

    * expandable capacity

    Nook comes with 2GB of internal memory. If you need more capacity, you can insert a microSD card to add up to 16GB more memory. Kindle comes with 4GB of internal memory - twice as much as Nook - but there's no way to expand that. Kindle doesn't accept memory cards of any type. If you mainly use your device to read ebooks and newspapers, this shouldn't be an issue. I have over 100 books on my Kindle, and I've used only a tiny fraction of the memory. Once Kindle's memory fills up, just delete books you don't need immediate access to; you can always restore them later, in seconds, for free.

    A few other notes:

    Kindle and Nook have other features, such as an MP3 player and a web browser, but I caution you to have low expectations for these features. The MP3 player on the Kindle is like the first-generation iPod shuffle - you can't see what song is playing, and you can't navigate to other songs on your device. I don't like the browser on either device; e-ink is just not a good technology for surfing the web; it's slower and clunkier than LCD screen technology, so even the browser on an Android phone or iPod touch is more enjoyable to use. However, some commenters have more favorable views of either device's browser, and you might, too.

    * PDF support

    Kindle and Nook both handle PDF files, but in different ways. When you put a PDF file on your nook, nook converts it into an ebook-like file, then you can adjust the font size, and the text and pagination will adjust just like with any ebook. But you cannot see the original PDF file in the native format in which it was created. Kindle 3 and Kindle DX have native support for PDF files. You can see PDF files just as they would appear on your computer. You can also convert PDF files to an ebook-like format, and then Kindle handles them just the way the Nook handles them - text and pagination adjust when you change the font size. Unfortunately, some symbols, equations, and graphics get lost or mangled in the translation - even when viewing PDF files in their native format on the Kindle. Moreover, the small screen size of the Kindle 3 and the Nook is not great for PDF files, most of which are designed for a larger page size. You can zoom and pan, but this is cumbersome and tiresome. Thanks to commenters who suggested viewing PDF files in landscape mode on the Kindle (I don't know if you can do this on Nook); this way, you can see the entire top half of the page without panning, and then scroll down to the bottom half. This works a little better.

    SUMMARY:

    Nook and Kindle each offer their own advantages. We like the nook's user-replaceable battery, compatibility with ePub format, and in-store experience. But we strongly prefer Kindle 3 because its performance is zippier, its higher-contrast screen is easier to read, and it's smaller and lighter so it is more portable and more comfortable to hold in one hand for long reading sessions.

    * Nook Color

    Everything I wrote about the Nook in this review applies to the original Nook (which continues to be available), not the new Nook Color. To me, the Nook Color is in a different product category than the Kindle or original Nook. Nook Color has an LCD screen, like an iPad or most computer monitors. Reading on a computer screen for long periods of time is not comfortable for me - it causes fatigue and headaches. The e-ink Kindle is very comfortable for long reading sessions. So I'll take a pass on the Nook Color. But it will probably be great for others, especially people who want to watch movies, surf the web and play games on their e-reader, and don't mind the extra cost, weight, or lack of 3G. I've seen and played with a Nook Color at my local B&N, and it is a very attractive device. I'm looking forward to reading user reviews of the Nook Color when people start getting them. If you get one, please post a comment to let us know how you like it.

    3-0 out of 5 stars Worth the money. Not perfect, but very very good for start to finish novels in good light, August 31, 2010
    The Kindle is my first e-ink reader. I own an iPad, an iPhone, and have owned a Windows-based phone in the past that I used as an ereader.

    My overall impression of the device is good.

    The good:
    I'd honestly rather read linear (read from page one to the end, one page at a time) fiction from it than a book, because I can't always get comfortable with a book. Hardcovers are sometimes a bit heavy, and paperbacks don't always lie open easily. The Kindle is incredibly light and thin. I can hold it in one hand easily. The page turn buttons are conveniently located. Page-turns aren't instant, but they're probably quicker than turning a physical page in a printed book (there are just a lot more page-turns unless you choose a small font). The contrast is better than other ereaders I've seen. There is zero eye strain in good light. My eyesight isn't the greatest and I like being able to increase the font size and read without glasses. I love being able to browse the Kindle store and read samples before deciding to purchase. The "experimental" browser is surprisingly usable, but isn't great. It is useful for browsing wikipedia and blogs. The biggest drawback to the browser is the awkward pointer navigation, using the 5-way pad. It syncs your furthest read page over the internet so you can pick up where you left off using your iPhone or iPad.

    The so-so:
    The kindle store could use more categories and sorting options. You can't sort by "top rated," and there is no category for "alternate histories," for example. Finding a very-specific type of fiction relies on keyword searches, which don't do a great job. The wifi sometimes doesn't connect before it times-out. You rarely need the wifi, but it is annoying if you change a setting, answer "OK" to the prompt to connect, and the thing tells you it failed to connect two seconds later (the exact moment it indicates that it did finally connect, then you need to go back to update the setting again). Most settings don't require a connection, but it is a minor annoyance. Most of your time will be spent reading, and of course your books are stored on the device and a connection is not required. Part of me wishes I'd bought the 3G model, because the browser is good enough that having lifetime free 3G wireless would be worth the extra money. Magazines don't look very good and are not very easy to navigate. There is minor glare in some lighting conditions, mostly when a lamp is positioned behind the reader's head.

    The bad:
    The contrast is fair to poor in dim light. It is much easier to read a printed page in dim light. In good light, contrast is on par with a pulp paperback. In dim light it feels almost like reading from an old Palm Pilot (resolution is better than an old Palm, but contrast is bad in dim light). The screen is small enough that the frequency of page turns is pretty high. Even in good light, the light gray background is less pleasant than the eggshell background of a printed page. You must tell it to sync before you switch it off, if you expect the feature allowing you to pick up where you left off using other devices to work correctly. The copy protection prevents you from using the files on anything other than Kindle software or devices.

    Vs iPad:
    IPad is a lot better for magazines, reference materials, and illustrated materials. Kindle is worlds better for reading novels. IPad is pretty heavy, making it more difficult to hold in your hand or carry with you everywhere. Kindle is much more portable and easier to hold. IPad has some amazing children's books and magazines, which take advantage of its multimedia features. IPad is unreadable in sunlight and glare is bad in bright light. Kindle is as good as a printed page in bright light. Ipad serves as a creative tool, a computing tool, a gaming tool, and a communication tool. Kindle is only a novel machine. I don't regret buying either one of them. An iPad won't replace books, but a Kindle can, if the book is text-only.

    I highly recommend this device at its new low price if you are a frequent reader of novels. I love my kindle. Just don't expect it to be more than it is. Leave the magazines and such to the tablet computers.

    4-0 out of 5 stars I Wanted a Dedicated E-Reader, and That's What I Got, September 7, 2010
    I'm a first-time Kindle owner, so I have nothing to "compare" the latest Kindle to. I don't own a Nook. I don't own an iPad (and, in any case, that's comparing apples to oranges). I don't have a Sony e-reader. '

    This will be a short, simple review.

    I received my Kindle about a week ago and haven't been able to put it down.

    Things I like about my Kindle?
    1. The e-ink display is amazing.
    2. Using the 5-way controller is simple and effective.
    3. Page turn speeds are faster than I thought they would be.
    4. It's lightweight, even with the attached cover (I have an Amazon cover with a built-in light)
    5. Page-turning buttons are quiet and well-placed.
    6. Recharge time is fast.
    7. I can order a book and start reading it in less than 60 seconds. Nice!
    8. Portability... I can take 3,000 books with me when I travel for work and not require additional suitcases or baggage fees.

    Things I'm not too keen on?
    1. Buttons are too close together and are laid out oddly.
    2. Lack of individual number buttons is frustrating.
    3. Power button on the bottom? Not a bad thing. Just an odd thing. (Same for the headphone input). I usually rest the "bottom" of a book on my lap when I read.

    Things I hope change in the future?
    1. How books are organized... When I put a book in a collection (which is actually a "tag"), it still appears in the main list. It's not actually "moved", it's merely associated.
    2. The look of the main screen. I'd like "folders" or some other way to display "collections".
    3. Ability to create personal "screen savers."
    4. E-book pricing, though Amazon has little control over this. Still, most titles are the same price as or less than their hardback/paperback counterparts. (And I'm not opposed to paying more for convenience and portability).

    Things that don't bother me regarding other reviews?
    1. The browser is experimental. Amazon has created a dedicated e-reader, and it's meant to be used to read. Period. Not browse the web. If you want to browse the web, get a computer -- not an e-reader.
    2. The Kindle is not an mP3 player, either. Yes, it's nice to have some classical music playing in the background while I read, but I don't need to see the title of the song, album art, etc. (And you can skip from track to track on the Kindle using shortcut keys).
    3. Lack of a "color" or "touch" screen.

    In summary, for $139, I'm quite thrilled with my purchase and have arleady read multiple books on it. In fact, I think I've read more in the past week than I've read in the past month.

    5-0 out of 5 stars Not the perfect "do-it-all" device, but very close to being the perfect e-reading device!, August 26, 2010
    I woke up to a nice surprise this morning: a new kindle as a gift. I have an iPad and a Kindle DX, but I guess someone heard my complaints of them being too heavy and difficult to do extended-reading on. Don't get me wrong, I absolutely love my iPad and DX, but this new generation of Kindle is perfect for reading outside and for long periods of time. The iPad gets completely washed out in sunlight and often irritates my eyes staring at it for more than a couple of hours. The DX was my go-to device for those extended/outdoor reading periods, but now I have a new friend for reading novels. Instead of a replacement, this one seems more like a companion to the other devices and is a different class. The iPad works great for web browsing, shopping, productivity, games, etc while the Kindle falls short in those areas. The Kindle works great for reading novels, where the iPad falls short. For those that love to do extended-reading of magazines, newspapers, research articles, etc, I find that the DX is the go-to device.

    Without a doubt, the size and weight of the new kindle is the biggest draw for me. It's smaller than the last edition by a significant margin. I've played around with the Kindle 2 and was impressed, but now looking at the size of the new Kindle, I'm blown away. It's the absolute perfect size. Smaller would be unmanageable and larger wouldn't feel nearly as good. This is a device that you can hold up, read, and just forget that it's there. Compared to other e-readers I've tried, it's much smaller and much lighter.

    One of my biggest complaints about the previous generation Kindles and the DX is the speed. It sometimes takes a while after you push `next page' for it to actually change. In addition, the web browsing feature was so slow and clunky that it is really unusable in my opinion. Two additions to the new Kindle have helped attenuate these issues. First, the pages do flip quicker (albeit, still slow in my opinion), and the addition of wifi has allowed faster connection for wireless activities (much better than only relying on 3G). I still can't see myself using the Kindle as an internet browsing tool or really doing much online aside from purchasing reading material, but the faster connection at least opens up the possibility - something that would only frustrate me on previous editions.

    The new Kindle also offers a better contrast than previous editions and it looks fantastic compared to every other e-reader I have seen. I have no trouble seeing the screen in dim light or in bright sunlight - it really opens up the ability to read almost anywhere you are. Of course, you'll still need a separate light for extremely dark areas.

    Another big addition to the Kindle 3 is that it offers double the storage compared to Kindle 2. I've never had a problem with the amount of storage since I can't possibly see myself filling up that much space (I don't put mp3's on it), but perhaps in the future, if certain applications or media files are put on the kindle, it could have been a problem. The additional space in the new model is definitely a welcome addition, but bringing back the memory card slot that was included on Kindle 1 would have been an even more welcome addition in my opinion.

    Among e-readers, I definitely recommend the Kindle 3 if not just because it has a better size/form-factor, contrast, battery life, and speed compared to every other e-reader I have tried. On top of that, you get the wonderful amazon buying experience and selection for all your literature and can keep your kindle library intact between whatever other device you want to download a Kindle application onto.

    The question of whether you need a Kindle vs another type of device for reading becomes a little more tricky and really comes down to what you want to use it for.

    Do you want a device to read novels on, perhaps read outside, and have something very light that you almost forget it's there? Buy the Kindle.

    Do you want something to lie in bed with for short periods of time while surfing the web? I might suggest going with the iPad, a different tablet, or a netbook.

    Do you already have a Kindle 1 or 2? That's a tough one.... I don't think the new edition has enough `new' to it to warrant the upgrade in my mind, but some might value the new size and wifi capabilities even more-so than I do. For me, the new Kindle was a welcome addition to my family of devices since I didn't have anything anywhere near its form factor and convenience.

    Should you get 3G + Wifi or just Wifi? I think this question can be answered simply by asking yourself if you travel a lot. Being able to buy books and access wireless content on the road is an indispensable option and well worth the extra money in my mind. Keeping the device mainly at home or near wifi hotspots really negates the need for 3G though.

    Overall, I have to give the Kindle a 5 star rating because it does what it was designed to do very well, and in my opinion better than any of the competition. While the new features and capabilities aren't game-changing and truly outstanding, it is smaller, more capable, and better than any other e-reader out there. If you want `one device to handle it all', this isn't the place to look, but If you want a fantastic device solely for reading books, this is what you want.

    5-0 out of 5 stars A hesistant buyer rejoices on his choice, September 2, 2010
    I researched the purchase of a Kindle for a long time. I couldn't decide whether or not it was worth buying a dedicated e-reader. Boy am I glad I made this purchase. The downside to Amazon's online selling of Kindle 3 is that the customers don't get to see it in person. It is much better in person. This may sound stupid, but when I got my new Kindle, I thought there was a stuck-on overlay on the screen containing a diagram of the unit's buttons, etc. I actually tried to peel it off. Doh! The e-ink on this unit is THAT good. I didn't realize that I was staring at the actual display. I also didn't realize that no power is required until the display changes. (thus the great battery life) I do a lot of reading, but was facing the prospect of reading less or buying large type books because of my variable and deteriorating eyesight. The new Kindle has been a godsend. Now, I can decide the size of type I need depending on my level of fatigue among other things. The weight and ergonomics are very good. For someone, like me, with neuropathy in his hands, it is extremely easy to manage and enjoyable to own. To me, it is easier to read than print books. The ease of navigation is great as is the speed. The battery life, so far, has been extraordinary. It easily connected to our home Wi-Fi, which by design does not broadcast an SSID. It downloads books so fast that I almost thought they were not completely received. I did not buy the 3G version because of the price difference and the fact that there is no coverage where I live. If you are not constantly traveling, I don't see the need to spend the extra bucks, but that is a matter of personal choice. For those who have no Wi-Fi at home, remember that you can always download the material to your computer and transfer it via USB. Just today I was watching an interview with Tony Blair on TV. He was talking about his new book, which sounded interesting. I picked up the Kindle and downloaded a free sample before the interview was over. I have only read the preface so far, but will probably buy the book. Now THAT is a great way to buy a book! I haven't used online browsing extensively yet, but find it reasonable for what the device is. This is primarily a book reader, not a laptop or notebook. They are great for what they do, but can't match the e-ink display, or the light weight. For those of you worrying about the wait for the new Kindle, let me end with, "It is worth the wait" This new Kindle is all about the quality of experience. There are many format choices for electronic reading. If you want the best experience, go with the Kindle.

    5-0 out of 5 stars Solid Improvements! Check out my video review!, August 27, 2010
    I just received my new Kindle, and my early impressions are very positive - it's definitely a solid step up from the previous generation Kindle. Check out my video review to see/hear more!

    UPDATE 9/7/2010: Hey guys - based on the comments received there are definitely some questions that people are interested in that I didn't touch on in my video review - so I wanted to take some time to answer some of those questions here. Hopefully this is helpful!

    Q: Is the Kindle 3 backlit? If not, then how do you see it at night?

    A: The Kindle 3 is not backlit. For the Kindle 2 I used a leather case with a reading light clipped to it. For the Kindle 3 Amazon produced a leather case that has a built-in reading light. I've been using it since day 1 and I love it. I made a video review for that also if you want to check it out:

    http://www.amazon.com/review/R27V1SXQSI9M86/

    Q: How well does the new joystick control work?

    A: The new Kindle replaces the old five-way navigation joystick with a center button surrounded by a thin 4-way directional control. After messing around with both of these approaches, I don't really have a strong personal preference one way or another - they both work fine for me.

    If you have big hands then I can definitely see having a bit of trouble getting used to the new joystick. The directional control is very thin, and if you're going to have trouble with any button on the Kindle... that's definitely going to be the one.

    Q: How is viewing PDFs on the Kindle 3? Are they easy to upload onto the Kindle?

    A: Uploading PDFs to the Kindle is very easy. You just connect your Kindle to your computer via USB cable and then drag and drop the PDFs. Totally simple. Viewing them is pretty decent, but the major problem is that most PDFs aren't designed for a 6 inch screen. You might have to do a lot of zooming and panning to see the content you want. If you plan on viewing a ton of PDFs, then you may want to check out the Kindle DX Wireless Reading Device, Free 3G, 9.7" Display, Graphite, 3G Works Globally  Latest Generation.

    Q: How well does the text-to-speech work?

    A: It's ok. You definitely won't mistake it for a professionally produced audiobook, but it doesn't sound as bad as you may think it will. Also note that text-to-speech is not available for every book. You can see on the product page for each Kindle book if text-to-speech is enabled or not.

    5-0 out of 5 stars K3 is perfect, August 28, 2010
    When I first unboxed the new K3, I was slightly disappointed. The new 5-way appeared to be harder to used than the little joystick of the K2. I have to say, though, two days later, I'm liking it much better. Since I'm getting used to it so quickly, I think in another day I won't know the difference.

    The size is absolutely perfect. In the Amazon cover, it is exactly like reading from a paperback book. It's noticeably lighter and easier to hold for reading, even with arthritis in my hands. The page turn buttons are wonderful. Almost no noise, and you don't have to push them as hard. It should make it much easier for those with weak or disabled hands. I also like have next page and previous buttons on both sides. I didn't think it would make a difference to me, but it really does.

    I tried a couple of times to connect the WiFi, but didn't get it to work. Today I had more time so I thought I'd try to puzzle through it. But when I navigated to the wireless menu, it had somehow figured out how to connect on its own. The browser is MUCH faster, and it made buying a book a breeze.

    I haven't had it long enough to comment on the extended battery life. But I was honestly fine with the more than 10 days I always got with K2.

    And the FONTS! My word what a difference! I can practically read in the dark! I've been able to reduce the font size from 4 to 2. Combine sharper contrast with better fonts and it's an unbeatable combo.

    The ONLY thing I would change if I could is to move the Menu button, and especially the Back button. I'm having a little trouble navigating with the down arrow because I hit Back. But I'm starting to get the hang of it.

    All in all, I think Amazon hit it out of the park with the K3!

    5-0 out of 5 stars K3 Even Better than its Predecessor, August 28, 2010
    It's no longer necessary to write about how desirable the Kindle is (or, for that matter, e-readers generally). Books and text and reading are with us to stay; only paper is becoming unnecessary. What we can discuss is how well a device performs its intended task(s), and how it compares to its competition on an absolute basis and for the price.

    My wife and I share a last gen 6" Kindle and just received a new 6" display K3. I know, Amazon doesn't call it that, but how else can users refer to it? In twenty words or less, it is an improvement over an already excellent product. Smaller, but not too small to be held comfortably. Same size display, but sharper and crisper, better contrast. Easy to use, somewhat smaller keyboard that takes a little, but very little, getting used to. It took me a few hours to stop accidentally pressing some neighboring keys, but now using the keyboard is second nature. And the page turning buttons are silent, but have sufficient tactile feedback, excellent feel.

    I found it very easy to duplicate our library from our older Kindle to our new K3, and to activate our home wifi. I don't like to say I "transferred" our books because that could be understood to mean they were taken from our old Kindle to our new one. I say "duplicate" because they reside on both Kindles. The instruction manual is detailed and somewhat lengthy, but very understandable. (It's 200 pages, but don't let that scare you; it's easy to find the parts you need, and you will never need more than a few pages at one time.) The manual is published on the device, as in the past, and can also be downloaded to your computer as a pdf file so you can read the instructions from your computer as you apply them to the K3.

    If you have wifi at home, which we do, when you are in range of a wifi that you have activated in your K3, it automatically uses that wifi, instead of connecting to the 3G AT&T network, assuming, of course, you have a 3G+wifi K3. It works faster on my home wifi than on the 3G network, so much so that if I had really thought it through before I bought it, or if I were to buy another, I would probably go wifi only and save $50. The only reasons to get the 3G+wifi model would seem to be if you don't have reliable access to wifi or if you travel a good deal to places that don't have a lot of wifi access, but do have AT&T connectivity AND you have need to download books or periodicals on a regular basis or without delay while you are away from home or office. If you can plan ahead and stock up on a few good books, and you have reliable access to wifi, such as at home/office, McDonalds or Starbucks, I suggest you think twice about whether you want the 3G+wifi K3, or the wifi only.

    Each K3 has its own email address and you can send documents to it, including Word and pdf docs, and photos. Of course, the photos are B&W, but very detailed and clear. The K3 permits surfing the web, although I haven't used it much for that purpose and, other than saying it works, I hesitate to pass judgment on how well I think someone who uses it for web browsing would like it.

    I can't compare it to other dedicated e-readers because I haven't used them. People seem to be interested in how I think it compares to the iPad, which I don't own but have "played with" somewhat extensively at the Apple Store. My assessment is that there is no comparison. The iPad will do much more, but as an e-reader I think the K3 is superior. I don't need color for reading text, the K3 is a fraction of the cost, and its smaller size makes it much more convenient to tote around. However, what kills the iPad as an e-reader, as far as I am concerned, is its weight. I suspect most of us are the same in this regard, but I tend to read for an hour or two at a stretch. A pound and a half doesn't sound too heavy, but I held an iPad for five minutes, literally, and my hands ached. It is simply too heavy to use as a book reading device, while the K3 is light as a feather. For reading, a cheaper and significantly lighter K3 as a dedicated e-reader is, IMHO, the way to go (compared to an iPad). BTW, a recent (in Aug. 2010) report from Taiwan said Apple in making a 6" iPod, which, depending on size and weight, could change the equation. It will be interesting to see how the e-reader market develops. I said I can't compare the K3 to other competitors, and I won't, but I can say I am completely satisfied with Amazon as an e-book seller. I've only had a few occasions to need support (on my old Kindle), but that has also been entirely satisfactory.

    Bottom line: my wife and I both like the K3 very much and recommend it to anyone considering buying an e-reader. I don't think you will regret buying one, with or without the free 3G.

    1-0 out of 5 stars Quality control problems, September 7, 2010
    First, the good stuff. Kindle 3 has a very readable high contrast screen. The form factor is small and light enough to be a book replacement. Purchasing and downloading content is simple and convenient.

    However, I had a series of problems which eventually led me to return my Kindle.

    After unpacking and charging my Kindle 3, it refused to connect to my wireless network. I have a variety of other devices ranging from a Nintendo Wii to an iPod Touch and two computers that work just fine on my wireless network, but the Kindle couldn't connect after many attempts. I eventually gave up and turned it off. When I turned it back on several hours later, it had mysteriously connected to my WiFi network with the exact same settings that did not work earlier. I have noticed that several other users have ran into the same problem.

    The next problem I noticed was that something was rolling around inside the casing. This is obviously not a good sign. Then, my Kindle 3 started freezing. The first freeze happened while using the experimental browser. As this is an "experimental" application, I wasn't too concerned. After a power reset, the Kindle came back up. The second freeze happened while playing Shuffled Row, which is a good game. After this freeze, my Kindle refused to reboot after many power reset attempts. (Yes, I did try keeping the power switch in the "turn-on" position for up to 30 seconds as suggested by the manual.) I eventually gave up and put it down. However, after a few minutes, the Kindle started to reboot itself. The was another freeze while reading a book, which was fixed with a power reset. I tried to contact Amazon for service, but it looks like the only way to get Kindle customer service is through a phone call.

    And then my Kindle froze again while reading a book. This time, nothing would reset the kindle. When this last freeze happened, the battery was charged about 75%. At this point, there was no option but to return the kindle. There are some comments among the negative reviews here that the usual Amazon.com return process does not work. In my case, I was able to follow the regular Amazon return process and print a return label. So my Kindle is back to Amazon after less than a week of use.

    Judging from other reviews that had similar experiences as mine, Amazon appears to have a specific quality control problem with this latest version of the Kindle. People may be more tolerant of the reliability other electronic gadgets, however, it is unacceptable for a product that is primarily intended to replace paper books to have issues like freezing and/or rebooting. After all, I never had a "paper" book freeze or reboot on me so far. Receiving a product with defects that should have been caught during testing before shipping pretty much destroys the "Kindle experience".

    UPDATE (October 31, 2010): Since I do like the Kindle concept, after reading about the improvement in stability with the latest software upgrades, I purchased another Kindle WiFi. Everything was great for almost two weeks, no crashes. However, yesterday, the second Kindle also ended up with a frozen screen. After following through the instructions on Amazon's Kindle troubleshooting page and talking to the customer service, there was no way to get the Kindle out of the frozen state, so this one is also going back. The fact that this situation can happen to the same customer twice in a matter of few months indicates either a serious quality control problem or component reliability problem.

    5-0 out of 5 stars Details on working with PDF, Wi-fi vs 3G, Starbucks, Audio books, MP3 and other things, August 27, 2010
    NOTE: Amazon limits the video size and duration, so I targeted what I thought were some key points.
    I check comments, so leave one if you have any questions not covered in the video or below and I'll try and answer.

    First off I love this device!!
    Like ipods are the king of MP3 players, this is the king of ebook readers in my opinion.

    I've been looking at this thing for at least 7+ hrs today and my eyes don't feel tired at all.

    If you want. . .
    * a low cost eBook reader
    * that allows you to read books
    * looks great
    * easy to setup
    * easy to hold/carry
    * easy on the eyes (no getting tired eyes from a glaring screen)
    . . . then look no further than this product!



    **Adding updates as I find other feature behaviors**

    - The comic I converted to PDF when emailed to my kindle email address the conversion process didn't like it too much. Better to not use the conversion process for those types of PDFs. Other PDF's converted just fine.
    - Emailing PDF = the conversion process seems to cut off the cover page each time
    - Emailing and having amazon convert is fast. I like it!
    - You can plug the kindle into the USB, then "eject" it from the OS. This allows you to continue to charge the kindle and read it at the same time. You could also just plug it into an electrical socket and read from it too.
    - If you stop/pause your MP3 music it will start all the way back at track #1. This is not an MP3 player. It also plays the most recently added track first
    - 10 minutes it goes into sleep mode, but if you leave Wi-fi on = drains your battery quicker. Better to turn Wi-fi off when not using it
    - Buy a case to protect it and get yourself a light for times when you don't have enough light to read by. This is not a cell-phone screen, meaning you can't read it in the dark. The screen very much simulates paper in this case.
    - Manual even states...you cannot connect the Wi-fi to a corporate wi-fi. Most companies require VPN of some sort, which is not supported here.
    - Loaded a 25Mb PDF and when when trying to search I get the following error message, ""your search can not be completed as this item has not been indexed. Please try again later." Found forum posts that said give the Kindle at least 10 minutes to complete indexing the file. . .longer if file if big. Sure enough, about 30 minutes later I tried again and was able to search this large PDF.

    8/29/10 update:
    - Just got back from Starbucks
    * Turned wi-fi on
    * Menu > Settings > Wifi Settings and selected the attwifi network option
    * Home > Menu > Experimental > Launch browser
    * zoom in on the terms & agreement checkbox and use the spacebar to check the box
    * click continue button and you are on the internet at the coffee shop!!

    9/3/10 update:
    - A week later, I haven't charged the unit nor shut it down, I've only put it into sleep mode. Battery indicator is still more than 80% full. Nice!
    - Someone pointed me towards "Calibre" a free conversion utility. Totally supports the Kindle 3 and converts to PDF, ePub, Mobi, etc. Works great and you can have the program send the converted document directly to your device via USB or email. The program also acts as your own "backup" by creating a document library on your hard drive that can be sorted, metadata updated, etc. It's very cool!

    9/5/10 update:
    - I kept getting unconverted PDFs (PDFs copied directly to unit via USB vs. sending to email for conversion) would result in the unit restarting when trying to access the PDF. Found forums that said you need to reset the unit. Slide & hold the power button for 15 seconds. Let it take the 20 seconds to reboot. This worked for me.

    9/10/10 update:
    Comments discussion & answers on the following:
    - Annotating PDFs, then accessing these notes for later review on a laptop/desktop
    - Is there an auto-scrolling for PDFs? = No
    - What its like to have the kindle "read" back to you? = robotic voice that ignores punctuation
    - More info on document conversion, including sending emails to the kindle for conversion?
    - The ability to access Gmail from the kindle? = yes, works fine though a bit slow on wi-fi

    9/19/10 update:
    - Check out the comments for my answer to, "Should I buy 3G or is wifi good enough?" = need to buy a book on the run, then get 3G. If you can wait till you get home or a coffee shop, then wi-fi works fine.

    9/24/10 update:
    Comments discussion & answers on the following:
    - Exactly how does an Audible audio book work with the Kindle?
    - Possible causes for why MP3 music is not recognized by the device?

    10/2/10 update:
    Comments discussion & answers on the following:
    - Can you play Audible audio books while at the same time reading along? = for all intents and purposes, no
    - How easy is it to register a new/used K3 to a different owner? = easy as pie

    10/23/10 update:
    Comments discussion & answers on the following:
    - Can you change out the battery yourself? = no
    - Can you share your documents with other kindle users? = legally only if both devices are under the same user account

    12/7/10 update:
    Comments discussion & answers on the following:
    - Can a color document show up as color on the kindle? = No, doc will be converted to greyscale
    - Able to support textbooks? = Yes, if in a supported document type
    - Should I pay the extra $50 for 3G in order to more easily access websites? = Up to you...many sites have mobile versions that load great on wi-fi. NOTE: still doesn't support sites that use Java
    - Will I have 3G coverage in my rural area? = Amazon gives a disclaimer in their FAQ that 3G connection is not guaranteed in some areas
    - Should I get the K3 for my 10 year old? = I personally feel this is a great device for any age reader. . .and gives the parent control/visibility to what is being read
    Read more


    2. Kindle 3G Wireless Reading Device, Free 3G + Wi-Fi, 3G Works Globally, Graphite, 6" Display with New E Ink Pearl Technology
    Electronics
    list price: $189.00 -- our price: $189.00
    (price subject to change: see help)
    Asin: B002FQJT3Q
    Manufacturer: Amazon.com
    Sales Rank: 1
    Average Customer Review: 4.4 out of 5 stars
    US | Canada | United Kingdom | Germany | France | Japan

    Editorial Review

    The all-new Kindle has a new electronic-ink screen with 50 percent better contrast than any other e-reader, a new sleek design with a 21 percent smaller body while still keeping the same 6-inch-size reading area, and a 15 percent lighter weight at just 8.7 ounces.The new Kindle also offers 20 percent faster page turns, up to one month of battery life, double the storage to 3,500 books, built-in Wi-Fi, a graphite color option and more—all for only $189, and still with free 3G wireless—no monthly bills or annual contracts. ... Read more

    Reviews

    5-0 out of 5 stars Kindle vs. Nook (updated 12/1/2010), August 28, 2010
    If you're trying to choose between a Nook and a Kindle, perhaps I can help. My wife and I have owned a Nook (the original one, not the new Nook Color), a Kindle 2, and a Kindle DX. When Amazon announced the Kindle 3 this summer, we pre-ordered two Kindle 3's: the wi-fi only model in graphite, and the wi-fi + 3G model in white. They arrived in late August and we have used them very regularly since then. For us, Kindle is better than Nook, but Nook is a good device with its own advantages that I will discuss below. I'll end this review with a few words about the Nook Color.

    First, reasons why we prefer the Kindle:

    * Speed

    In our experience, the Kindle is very zippy compared to the Nook. Page refresh speed (the time it takes a new page to appear after you push the page-turn button) was WAY quicker on Kindle 2 than on Nook, and it's quicker yet on Kindle 3. Yet, I read a whole book on the Nook and didn't find the slower page refresh to be annoying - you get used to it, and it's not a problem.

    For me, the more important speed difference concerns navigation - moving the cursor around the screen, for example to pick a book from your library, or to jump to a chapter by selecting it in the table of contents. On Kindle, you do this by pushing a 5-way rocker button, and the cursor moves very quickly. On Nook, you do this by activating the color LCD touchscreen (which normally shuts off when not in use, to conserve battery). A "virtual rocker button" appears on the screen, and you touch it to move the cursor. Unfortunately, the Nook cursor moves very sluggishly. This might not be a big deal to you, but it really got annoying to me, especially since my wife's Kindle was so quick and responsive.

    In November 2010, Nook got a software upgrade that increases page refresh speed and makes navigation more responsive. I returned my Nook months ago, so I cannot tell you if the Nook's performance is now equal to the Kindle's, but Nook owners in the comments section have convinced me that the software update improves the experience of using the Nook. If performance is a big factor in your decision, visit a Best Buy and compare Kindle and Nook side by side.

    * Screen contrast

    You've seen Amazon's claims that the Kindle 3 e-ink has 50% better contrast than Kindle 2 or other e-ink devices. I have no way of precisely measuring the improvement in contrast, but I can tell you that the Kindle 3 display definitely has more contrast than Kindle 2 or Nook. The difference is noticeable, and important: more screen contrast means less eyestrain when reading in poorly lit rooms.

    In well-lit rooms, the Nook and Kindle 2 have enough contrast to allow for comfortable reading. But I often read in low-light conditions, like in bed at night, or in a poorly lit room. In these situations, reading on Nook or Kindle 2 was a bit uncomfortable and often gave me a mild headache. When I got the Kindle 3, the extra contrast was immediately noticeable, and made it more comfortable to read under less-than-ideal lighting conditions. (If you go with a Nook, just make sure you have a good reading lamp nearby.)

    * Battery life

    The Nook's color LCD touch screen drains its battery quickly - I could never get more than 5 days out of a charge. The Kindle 2 had longer battery life than the Nook, and Kindle 3 has even longer life: in the 3 months since we received our Kindle 3's, we typically get 3 weeks of battery life between charges. (We keep wireless off about half the time to save battery power.)

    * Weight

    Nook weighs about 3 ounces more than the new Kindle, and you can really feel the difference. Without a case, Nook is still light enough to hold in one hand for long reading sessions without fatigue. But in a case, Nook is a heavy sucker. The new Kindle 3 is so light, even in a case, we find it comfortable holding in one hand for long reading sessions.

    Reasons some people might prefer the Nook:

    * In-store experience

    If you need help with your nook, you can take it to any barnes and noble and get a real human to help. You can take your nook into the coffee shop section of your local B&N store and read any book for free for up to one hour per day. When you take your nook to B&N, some in-store special deals and the occasional free book pop up on your screen.

    * User-replaceable battery

    Rechargeable batteries eventually lose their ability to hold a charge. Nook's battery is user-replaceable and relatively inexpensive. To replace Kindle's battery, Amazon wants you to ship your Kindle to Amazon, and they will ship you back a DIFFERENT Kindle than the one you sent (it's the same model, for example if you send a white Kindle 3, you get a white Kindle 3 back, but you get a "refurbished" one, NOT the exact one you sent them). I don't like this at all.

    However, several people have posted comments here that have eased my concerns. Someone looked up statistics on the Kindle's battery and did some simple calculations to show that it should last for 3 or more years. Before that happens, I will surely have upgraded to a newer Kindle model by then. Also, someone found some companies that sell Kindle batteries at reasonable cost and have how-to videos that demonstrate how we can replace the battery ourselves. Doing this would void the Kindle's warranty, but the battery will probably not fail until long after the warranty expires.

    * ePub

    Nook uses the ePub format, a widely used open format. Amazon uses a proprietary ebook format. Many libraries will "lend" ebooks in the ePub format, which works with nook but not kindle. However, a free and reputable program called Calibre allows you to translate ebooks from one format to another - it supports many formats, including ePub and Kindle. The only catch is that it doesn't work with copy-protected ebooks, so you can't, for example, buy a Kindle book (which is copy protected) and translate it to ePub so you can read it on a Nook.

    * lending e-books to friends

    Nook owners can "loan" ebooks they purchased to other nook owners for up to two weeks. You can't do this with kindle - yet. Amazon has announced it will soon add this lending feature to all kindles (via a software update that will be available to people who already own kindles).

    * Nook's color LCD touchscreen

    This could be a pro or con, depending on your preferences. It makes nook hipper and less drab than kindle. Some people enjoy using the color LCD to view their library or navigate. I did, at first. But after two weeks of use, and comparisons with my wife's kindle, I found the dedicated buttons of the kindle easier and far quicker to use than the nook's color touchscreen. I also found the bright light from the color screen distracting when I was trying to read a book or newspaper (though when not in use, it shuts off after a minute or so to conserve battery).

    * expandable capacity

    Nook comes with 2GB of internal memory. If you need more capacity, you can insert a microSD card to add up to 16GB more memory. Kindle comes with 4GB of internal memory - twice as much as Nook - but there's no way to expand that. Kindle doesn't accept memory cards of any type. If you mainly use your device to read ebooks and newspapers, this shouldn't be an issue. I have over 100 books on my Kindle, and I've used only a tiny fraction of the memory. Once Kindle's memory fills up, just delete books you don't need immediate access to; you can always restore them later, in seconds, for free.

    A few other notes:

    Kindle and Nook have other features, such as an MP3 player and a web browser, but I caution you to have low expectations for these features. The MP3 player on the Kindle is like the first-generation iPod shuffle - you can't see what song is playing, and you can't navigate to other songs on your device. I don't like the browser on either device; e-ink is just not a good technology for surfing the web; it's slower and clunkier than LCD screen technology, so even the browser on an Android phone or iPod touch is more enjoyable to use. However, some commenters have more favorable views of either device's browser, and you might, too.

    * PDF support

    Kindle and Nook both handle PDF files, but in different ways. When you put a PDF file on your nook, nook converts it into an ebook-like file, then you can adjust the font size, and the text and pagination will adjust just like with any ebook. But you cannot see the original PDF file in the native format in which it was created. Kindle 3 and Kindle DX have native support for PDF files. You can see PDF files just as they would appear on your computer. You can also convert PDF files to an ebook-like format, and then Kindle handles them just the way the Nook handles them - text and pagination adjust when you change the font size. Unfortunately, some symbols, equations, and graphics get lost or mangled in the translation - even when viewing PDF files in their native format on the Kindle. Moreover, the small screen size of the Kindle 3 and the Nook is not great for PDF files, most of which are designed for a larger page size. You can zoom and pan, but this is cumbersome and tiresome. Thanks to commenters who suggested viewing PDF files in landscape mode on the Kindle (I don't know if you can do this on Nook); this way, you can see the entire top half of the page without panning, and then scroll down to the bottom half. This works a little better.

    SUMMARY:

    Nook and Kindle each offer their own advantages. We like the nook's user-replaceable battery, compatibility with ePub format, and in-store experience. But we strongly prefer Kindle 3 because its performance is zippier, its higher-contrast screen is easier to read, and it's smaller and lighter so it is more portable and more comfortable to hold in one hand for long reading sessions.

    * Nook Color

    Everything I wrote about the Nook in this review applies to the original Nook (which continues to be available), not the new Nook Color. To me, the Nook Color is in a different product category than the Kindle or original Nook. Nook Color has an LCD screen, like an iPad or most computer monitors. Reading on a computer screen for long periods of time is not comfortable for me - it causes fatigue and headaches. The e-ink Kindle is very comfortable for long reading sessions. So I'll take a pass on the Nook Color. But it will probably be great for others, especially people who want to watch movies, surf the web and play games on their e-reader, and don't mind the extra cost, weight, or lack of 3G. I've seen and played with a Nook Color at my local B&N, and it is a very attractive device. I'm looking forward to reading user reviews of the Nook Color when people start getting them. If you get one, please post a comment to let us know how you like it.

    3-0 out of 5 stars Worth the money. Not perfect, but very very good for start to finish novels in good light, August 31, 2010
    The Kindle is my first e-ink reader. I own an iPad, an iPhone, and have owned a Windows-based phone in the past that I used as an ereader.

    My overall impression of the device is good.

    The good:
    I'd honestly rather read linear (read from page one to the end, one page at a time) fiction from it than a book, because I can't always get comfortable with a book. Hardcovers are sometimes a bit heavy, and paperbacks don't always lie open easily. The Kindle is incredibly light and thin. I can hold it in one hand easily. The page turn buttons are conveniently located. Page-turns aren't instant, but they're probably quicker than turning a physical page in a printed book (there are just a lot more page-turns unless you choose a small font). The contrast is better than other ereaders I've seen. There is zero eye strain in good light. My eyesight isn't the greatest and I like being able to increase the font size and read without glasses. I love being able to browse the Kindle store and read samples before deciding to purchase. The "experimental" browser is surprisingly usable, but isn't great. It is useful for browsing wikipedia and blogs. The biggest drawback to the browser is the awkward pointer navigation, using the 5-way pad. It syncs your furthest read page over the internet so you can pick up where you left off using your iPhone or iPad.

    The so-so:
    The kindle store could use more categories and sorting options. You can't sort by "top rated," and there is no category for "alternate histories," for example. Finding a very-specific type of fiction relies on keyword searches, which don't do a great job. The wifi sometimes doesn't connect before it times-out. You rarely need the wifi, but it is annoying if you change a setting, answer "OK" to the prompt to connect, and the thing tells you it failed to connect two seconds later (the exact moment it indicates that it did finally connect, then you need to go back to update the setting again). Most settings don't require a connection, but it is a minor annoyance. Most of your time will be spent reading, and of course your books are stored on the device and a connection is not required. Part of me wishes I'd bought the 3G model, because the browser is good enough that having lifetime free 3G wireless would be worth the extra money. Magazines don't look very good and are not very easy to navigate. There is minor glare in some lighting conditions, mostly when a lamp is positioned behind the reader's head.

    The bad:
    The contrast is fair to poor in dim light. It is much easier to read a printed page in dim light. In good light, contrast is on par with a pulp paperback. In dim light it feels almost like reading from an old Palm Pilot (resolution is better than an old Palm, but contrast is bad in dim light). The screen is small enough that the frequency of page turns is pretty high. Even in good light, the light gray background is less pleasant than the eggshell background of a printed page. You must tell it to sync before you switch it off, if you expect the feature allowing you to pick up where you left off using other devices to work correctly. The copy protection prevents you from using the files on anything other than Kindle software or devices.

    Vs iPad:
    IPad is a lot better for magazines, reference materials, and illustrated materials. Kindle is worlds better for reading novels. IPad is pretty heavy, making it more difficult to hold in your hand or carry with you everywhere. Kindle is much more portable and easier to hold. IPad has some amazing children's books and magazines, which take advantage of its multimedia features. IPad is unreadable in sunlight and glare is bad in bright light. Kindle is as good as a printed page in bright light. Ipad serves as a creative tool, a computing tool, a gaming tool, and a communication tool. Kindle is only a novel machine. I don't regret buying either one of them. An iPad won't replace books, but a Kindle can, if the book is text-only.

    I highly recommend this device at its new low price if you are a frequent reader of novels. I love my kindle. Just don't expect it to be more than it is. Leave the magazines and such to the tablet computers.

    4-0 out of 5 stars I Wanted a Dedicated E-Reader, and That's What I Got, September 7, 2010
    I'm a first-time Kindle owner, so I have nothing to "compare" the latest Kindle to. I don't own a Nook. I don't own an iPad (and, in any case, that's comparing apples to oranges). I don't have a Sony e-reader. '

    This will be a short, simple review.

    I received my Kindle about a week ago and haven't been able to put it down.

    Things I like about my Kindle?
    1. The e-ink display is amazing.
    2. Using the 5-way controller is simple and effective.
    3. Page turn speeds are faster than I thought they would be.
    4. It's lightweight, even with the attached cover (I have an Amazon cover with a built-in light)
    5. Page-turning buttons are quiet and well-placed.
    6. Recharge time is fast.
    7. I can order a book and start reading it in less than 60 seconds. Nice!
    8. Portability... I can take 3,000 books with me when I travel for work and not require additional suitcases or baggage fees.

    Things I'm not too keen on?
    1. Buttons are too close together and are laid out oddly.
    2. Lack of individual number buttons is frustrating.
    3. Power button on the bottom? Not a bad thing. Just an odd thing. (Same for the headphone input). I usually rest the "bottom" of a book on my lap when I read.

    Things I hope change in the future?
    1. How books are organized... When I put a book in a collection (which is actually a "tag"), it still appears in the main list. It's not actually "moved", it's merely associated.
    2. The look of the main screen. I'd like "folders" or some other way to display "collections".
    3. Ability to create personal "screen savers."
    4. E-book pricing, though Amazon has little control over this. Still, most titles are the same price as or less than their hardback/paperback counterparts. (And I'm not opposed to paying more for convenience and portability).

    Things that don't bother me regarding other reviews?
    1. The browser is experimental. Amazon has created a dedicated e-reader, and it's meant to be used to read. Period. Not browse the web. If you want to browse the web, get a computer -- not an e-reader.
    2. The Kindle is not an mP3 player, either. Yes, it's nice to have some classical music playing in the background while I read, but I don't need to see the title of the song, album art, etc. (And you can skip from track to track on the Kindle using shortcut keys).
    3. Lack of a "color" or "touch" screen.

    In summary, for $139, I'm quite thrilled with my purchase and have arleady read multiple books on it. In fact, I think I've read more in the past week than I've read in the past month.

    5-0 out of 5 stars Not the perfect "do-it-all" device, but very close to being the perfect e-reading device!, August 26, 2010
    I woke up to a nice surprise this morning: a new kindle as a gift. I have an iPad and a Kindle DX, but I guess someone heard my complaints of them being too heavy and difficult to do extended-reading on. Don't get me wrong, I absolutely love my iPad and DX, but this new generation of Kindle is perfect for reading outside and for long periods of time. The iPad gets completely washed out in sunlight and often irritates my eyes staring at it for more than a couple of hours. The DX was my go-to device for those extended/outdoor reading periods, but now I have a new friend for reading novels. Instead of a replacement, this one seems more like a companion to the other devices and is a different class. The iPad works great for web browsing, shopping, productivity, games, etc while the Kindle falls short in those areas. The Kindle works great for reading novels, where the iPad falls short. For those that love to do extended-reading of magazines, newspapers, research articles, etc, I find that the DX is the go-to device.

    Without a doubt, the size and weight of the new kindle is the biggest draw for me. It's smaller than the last edition by a significant margin. I've played around with the Kindle 2 and was impressed, but now looking at the size of the new Kindle, I'm blown away. It's the absolute perfect size. Smaller would be unmanageable and larger wouldn't feel nearly as good. This is a device that you can hold up, read, and just forget that it's there. Compared to other e-readers I've tried, it's much smaller and much lighter.

    One of my biggest complaints about the previous generation Kindles and the DX is the speed. It sometimes takes a while after you push `next page' for it to actually change. In addition, the web browsing feature was so slow and clunky that it is really unusable in my opinion. Two additions to the new Kindle have helped attenuate these issues. First, the pages do flip quicker (albeit, still slow in my opinion), and the addition of wifi has allowed faster connection for wireless activities (much better than only relying on 3G). I still can't see myself using the Kindle as an internet browsing tool or really doing much online aside from purchasing reading material, but the faster connection at least opens up the possibility - something that would only frustrate me on previous editions.

    The new Kindle also offers a better contrast than previous editions and it looks fantastic compared to every other e-reader I have seen. I have no trouble seeing the screen in dim light or in bright sunlight - it really opens up the ability to read almost anywhere you are. Of course, you'll still need a separate light for extremely dark areas.

    Another big addition to the Kindle 3 is that it offers double the storage compared to Kindle 2. I've never had a problem with the amount of storage since I can't possibly see myself filling up that much space (I don't put mp3's on it), but perhaps in the future, if certain applications or media files are put on the kindle, it could have been a problem. The additional space in the new model is definitely a welcome addition, but bringing back the memory card slot that was included on Kindle 1 would have been an even more welcome addition in my opinion.

    Among e-readers, I definitely recommend the Kindle 3 if not just because it has a better size/form-factor, contrast, battery life, and speed compared to every other e-reader I have tried. On top of that, you get the wonderful amazon buying experience and selection for all your literature and can keep your kindle library intact between whatever other device you want to download a Kindle application onto.

    The question of whether you need a Kindle vs another type of device for reading becomes a little more tricky and really comes down to what you want to use it for.

    Do you want a device to read novels on, perhaps read outside, and have something very light that you almost forget it's there? Buy the Kindle.

    Do you want something to lie in bed with for short periods of time while surfing the web? I might suggest going with the iPad, a different tablet, or a netbook.

    Do you already have a Kindle 1 or 2? That's a tough one.... I don't think the new edition has enough `new' to it to warrant the upgrade in my mind, but some might value the new size and wifi capabilities even more-so than I do. For me, the new Kindle was a welcome addition to my family of devices since I didn't have anything anywhere near its form factor and convenience.

    Should you get 3G + Wifi or just Wifi? I think this question can be answered simply by asking yourself if you travel a lot. Being able to buy books and access wireless content on the road is an indispensable option and well worth the extra money in my mind. Keeping the device mainly at home or near wifi hotspots really negates the need for 3G though.

    Overall, I have to give the Kindle a 5 star rating because it does what it was designed to do very well, and in my opinion better than any of the competition. While the new features and capabilities aren't game-changing and truly outstanding, it is smaller, more capable, and better than any other e-reader out there. If you want `one device to handle it all', this isn't the place to look, but If you want a fantastic device solely for reading books, this is what you want.

    5-0 out of 5 stars A hesistant buyer rejoices on his choice, September 2, 2010
    I researched the purchase of a Kindle for a long time. I couldn't decide whether or not it was worth buying a dedicated e-reader. Boy am I glad I made this purchase. The downside to Amazon's online selling of Kindle 3 is that the customers don't get to see it in person. It is much better in person. This may sound stupid, but when I got my new Kindle, I thought there was a stuck-on overlay on the screen containing a diagram of the unit's buttons, etc. I actually tried to peel it off. Doh! The e-ink on this unit is THAT good. I didn't realize that I was staring at the actual display. I also didn't realize that no power is required until the display changes. (thus the great battery life) I do a lot of reading, but was facing the prospect of reading less or buying large type books because of my variable and deteriorating eyesight. The new Kindle has been a godsend. Now, I can decide the size of type I need depending on my level of fatigue among other things. The weight and ergonomics are very good. For someone, like me, with neuropathy in his hands, it is extremely easy to manage and enjoyable to own. To me, it is easier to read than print books. The ease of navigation is great as is the speed. The battery life, so far, has been extraordinary. It easily connected to our home Wi-Fi, which by design does not broadcast an SSID. It downloads books so fast that I almost thought they were not completely received. I did not buy the 3G version because of the price difference and the fact that there is no coverage where I live. If you are not constantly traveling, I don't see the need to spend the extra bucks, but that is a matter of personal choice. For those who have no Wi-Fi at home, remember that you can always download the material to your computer and transfer it via USB. Just today I was watching an interview with Tony Blair on TV. He was talking about his new book, which sounded interesting. I picked up the Kindle and downloaded a free sample before the interview was over. I have only read the preface so far, but will probably buy the book. Now THAT is a great way to buy a book! I haven't used online browsing extensively yet, but find it reasonable for what the device is. This is primarily a book reader, not a laptop or notebook. They are great for what they do, but can't match the e-ink display, or the light weight. For those of you worrying about the wait for the new Kindle, let me end with, "It is worth the wait" This new Kindle is all about the quality of experience. There are many format choices for electronic reading. If you want the best experience, go with the Kindle.

    5-0 out of 5 stars Solid Improvements! Check out my video review!, August 27, 2010
    I just received my new Kindle, and my early impressions are very positive - it's definitely a solid step up from the previous generation Kindle. Check out my video review to see/hear more!

    UPDATE 9/7/2010: Hey guys - based on the comments received there are definitely some questions that people are interested in that I didn't touch on in my video review - so I wanted to take some time to answer some of those questions here. Hopefully this is helpful!

    Q: Is the Kindle 3 backlit? If not, then how do you see it at night?

    A: The Kindle 3 is not backlit. For the Kindle 2 I used a leather case with a reading light clipped to it. For the Kindle 3 Amazon produced a leather case that has a built-in reading light. I've been using it since day 1 and I love it. I made a video review for that also if you want to check it out:

    http://www.amazon.com/review/R27V1SXQSI9M86/

    Q: How well does the new joystick control work?

    A: The new Kindle replaces the old five-way navigation joystick with a center button surrounded by a thin 4-way directional control. After messing around with both of these approaches, I don't really have a strong personal preference one way or another - they both work fine for me.

    If you have big hands then I can definitely see having a bit of trouble getting used to the new joystick. The directional control is very thin, and if you're going to have trouble with any button on the Kindle... that's definitely going to be the one.

    Q: How is viewing PDFs on the Kindle 3? Are they easy to upload onto the Kindle?

    A: Uploading PDFs to the Kindle is very easy. You just connect your Kindle to your computer via USB cable and then drag and drop the PDFs. Totally simple. Viewing them is pretty decent, but the major problem is that most PDFs aren't designed for a 6 inch screen. You might have to do a lot of zooming and panning to see the content you want. If you plan on viewing a ton of PDFs, then you may want to check out the Kindle DX Wireless Reading Device, Free 3G, 9.7" Display, Graphite, 3G Works Globally  Latest Generation.

    Q: How well does the text-to-speech work?

    A: It's ok. You definitely won't mistake it for a professionally produced audiobook, but it doesn't sound as bad as you may think it will. Also note that text-to-speech is not available for every book. You can see on the product page for each Kindle book if text-to-speech is enabled or not.

    5-0 out of 5 stars K3 is perfect, August 28, 2010
    When I first unboxed the new K3, I was slightly disappointed. The new 5-way appeared to be harder to used than the little joystick of the K2. I have to say, though, two days later, I'm liking it much better. Since I'm getting used to it so quickly, I think in another day I won't know the difference.

    The size is absolutely perfect. In the Amazon cover, it is exactly like reading from a paperback book. It's noticeably lighter and easier to hold for reading, even with arthritis in my hands. The page turn buttons are wonderful. Almost no noise, and you don't have to push them as hard. It should make it much easier for those with weak or disabled hands. I also like have next page and previous buttons on both sides. I didn't think it would make a difference to me, but it really does.

    I tried a couple of times to connect the WiFi, but didn't get it to work. Today I had more time so I thought I'd try to puzzle through it. But when I navigated to the wireless menu, it had somehow figured out how to connect on its own. The browser is MUCH faster, and it made buying a book a breeze.

    I haven't had it long enough to comment on the extended battery life. But I was honestly fine with the more than 10 days I always got with K2.

    And the FONTS! My word what a difference! I can practically read in the dark! I've been able to reduce the font size from 4 to 2. Combine sharper contrast with better fonts and it's an unbeatable combo.

    The ONLY thing I would change if I could is to move the Menu button, and especially the Back button. I'm having a little trouble navigating with the down arrow because I hit Back. But I'm starting to get the hang of it.

    All in all, I think Amazon hit it out of the park with the K3!

    5-0 out of 5 stars K3 Even Better than its Predecessor, August 28, 2010
    It's no longer necessary to write about how desirable the Kindle is (or, for that matter, e-readers generally). Books and text and reading are with us to stay; only paper is becoming unnecessary. What we can discuss is how well a device performs its intended task(s), and how it compares to its competition on an absolute basis and for the price.

    My wife and I share a last gen 6" Kindle and just received a new 6" display K3. I know, Amazon doesn't call it that, but how else can users refer to it? In twenty words or less, it is an improvement over an already excellent product. Smaller, but not too small to be held comfortably. Same size display, but sharper and crisper, better contrast. Easy to use, somewhat smaller keyboard that takes a little, but very little, getting used to. It took me a few hours to stop accidentally pressing some neighboring keys, but now using the keyboard is second nature. And the page turning buttons are silent, but have sufficient tactile feedback, excellent feel.

    I found it very easy to duplicate our library from our older Kindle to our new K3, and to activate our home wifi. I don't like to say I "transferred" our books because that could be understood to mean they were taken from our old Kindle to our new one. I say "duplicate" because they reside on both Kindles. The instruction manual is detailed and somewhat lengthy, but very understandable. (It's 200 pages, but don't let that scare you; it's easy to find the parts you need, and you will never need more than a few pages at one time.) The manual is published on the device, as in the past, and can also be downloaded to your computer as a pdf file so you can read the instructions from your computer as you apply them to the K3.

    If you have wifi at home, which we do, when you are in range of a wifi that you have activated in your K3, it automatically uses that wifi, instead of connecting to the 3G AT&T network, assuming, of course, you have a 3G+wifi K3. It works faster on my home wifi than on the 3G network, so much so that if I had really thought it through before I bought it, or if I were to buy another, I would probably go wifi only and save $50. The only reasons to get the 3G+wifi model would seem to be if you don't have reliable access to wifi or if you travel a good deal to places that don't have a lot of wifi access, but do have AT&T connectivity AND you have need to download books or periodicals on a regular basis or without delay while you are away from home or office. If you can plan ahead and stock up on a few good books, and you have reliable access to wifi, such as at home/office, McDonalds or Starbucks, I suggest you think twice about whether you want the 3G+wifi K3, or the wifi only.

    Each K3 has its own email address and you can send documents to it, including Word and pdf docs, and photos. Of course, the photos are B&W, but very detailed and clear. The K3 permits surfing the web, although I haven't used it much for that purpose and, other than saying it works, I hesitate to pass judgment on how well I think someone who uses it for web browsing would like it.

    I can't compare it to other dedicated e-readers because I haven't used them. People seem to be interested in how I think it compares to the iPad, which I don't own but have "played with" somewhat extensively at the Apple Store. My assessment is that there is no comparison. The iPad will do much more, but as an e-reader I think the K3 is superior. I don't need color for reading text, the K3 is a fraction of the cost, and its smaller size makes it much more convenient to tote around. However, what kills the iPad as an e-reader, as far as I am concerned, is its weight. I suspect most of us are the same in this regard, but I tend to read for an hour or two at a stretch. A pound and a half doesn't sound too heavy, but I held an iPad for five minutes, literally, and my hands ached. It is simply too heavy to use as a book reading device, while the K3 is light as a feather. For reading, a cheaper and significantly lighter K3 as a dedicated e-reader is, IMHO, the way to go (compared to an iPad). BTW, a recent (in Aug. 2010) report from Taiwan said Apple in making a 6" iPod, which, depending on size and weight, could change the equation. It will be interesting to see how the e-reader market develops. I said I can't compare the K3 to other competitors, and I won't, but I can say I am completely satisfied with Amazon as an e-book seller. I've only had a few occasions to need support (on my old Kindle), but that has also been entirely satisfactory.

    Bottom line: my wife and I both like the K3 very much and recommend it to anyone considering buying an e-reader. I don't think you will regret buying one, with or without the free 3G.

    1-0 out of 5 stars Quality control problems, September 7, 2010
    First, the good stuff. Kindle 3 has a very readable high contrast screen. The form factor is small and light enough to be a book replacement. Purchasing and downloading content is simple and convenient.

    However, I had a series of problems which eventually led me to return my Kindle.

    After unpacking and charging my Kindle 3, it refused to connect to my wireless network. I have a variety of other devices ranging from a Nintendo Wii to an iPod Touch and two computers that work just fine on my wireless network, but the Kindle couldn't connect after many attempts. I eventually gave up and turned it off. When I turned it back on several hours later, it had mysteriously connected to my WiFi network with the exact same settings that did not work earlier. I have noticed that several other users have ran into the same problem.

    The next problem I noticed was that something was rolling around inside the casing. This is obviously not a good sign. Then, my Kindle 3 started freezing. The first freeze happened while using the experimental browser. As this is an "experimental" application, I wasn't too concerned. After a power reset, the Kindle came back up. The second freeze happened while playing Shuffled Row, which is a good game. After this freeze, my Kindle refused to reboot after many power reset attempts. (Yes, I did try keeping the power switch in the "turn-on" position for up to 30 seconds as suggested by the manual.) I eventually gave up and put it down. However, after a few minutes, the Kindle started to reboot itself. The was another freeze while reading a book, which was fixed with a power reset. I tried to contact Amazon for service, but it looks like the only way to get Kindle customer service is through a phone call.

    And then my Kindle froze again while reading a book. This time, nothing would reset the kindle. When this last freeze happened, the battery was charged about 75%. At this point, there was no option but to return the kindle. There are some comments among the negative reviews here that the usual Amazon.com return process does not work. In my case, I was able to follow the regular Amazon return process and print a return label. So my Kindle is back to Amazon after less than a week of use.

    Judging from other reviews that had similar experiences as mine, Amazon appears to have a specific quality control problem with this latest version of the Kindle. People may be more tolerant of the reliability other electronic gadgets, however, it is unacceptable for a product that is primarily intended to replace paper books to have issues like freezing and/or rebooting. After all, I never had a "paper" book freeze or reboot on me so far. Receiving a product with defects that should have been caught during testing before shipping pretty much destroys the "Kindle experience".

    UPDATE (October 31, 2010): Since I do like the Kindle concept, after reading about the improvement in stability with the latest software upgrades, I purchased another Kindle WiFi. Everything was great for almost two weeks, no crashes. However, yesterday, the second Kindle also ended up with a frozen screen. After following through the instructions on Amazon's Kindle troubleshooting page and talking to the customer service, there was no way to get the Kindle out of the frozen state, so this one is also going back. The fact that this situation can happen to the same customer twice in a matter of few months indicates either a serious quality control problem or component reliability problem.

    5-0 out of 5 stars Details on working with PDF, Wi-fi vs 3G, Starbucks, Audio books, MP3 and other things, August 27, 2010
    NOTE: Amazon limits the video size and duration, so I targeted what I thought were some key points.
    I check comments, so leave one if you have any questions not covered in the video or below and I'll try and answer.

    First off I love this device!!
    Like ipods are the king of MP3 players, this is the king of ebook readers in my opinion.

    I've been looking at this thing for at least 7+ hrs today and my eyes don't feel tired at all.

    If you want. . .
    * a low cost eBook reader
    * that allows you to read books
    * looks great
    * easy to setup
    * easy to hold/carry
    * easy on the eyes (no getting tired eyes from a glaring screen)
    . . . then look no further than this product!



    **Adding updates as I find other feature behaviors**

    - The comic I converted to PDF when emailed to my kindle email address the conversion process didn't like it too much. Better to not use the conversion process for those types of PDFs. Other PDF's converted just fine.
    - Emailing PDF = the conversion process seems to cut off the cover page each time
    - Emailing and having amazon convert is fast. I like it!
    - You can plug the kindle into the USB, then "eject" it from the OS. This allows you to continue to charge the kindle and read it at the same time. You could also just plug it into an electrical socket and read from it too.
    - If you stop/pause your MP3 music it will start all the way back at track #1. This is not an MP3 player. It also plays the most recently added track first
    - 10 minutes it goes into sleep mode, but if you leave Wi-fi on = drains your battery quicker. Better to turn Wi-fi off when not using it
    - Buy a case to protect it and get yourself a light for times when you don't have enough light to read by. This is not a cell-phone screen, meaning you can't read it in the dark. The screen very much simulates paper in this case.
    - Manual even states...you cannot connect the Wi-fi to a corporate wi-fi. Most companies require VPN of some sort, which is not supported here.
    - Loaded a 25Mb PDF and when when trying to search I get the following error message, ""your search can not be completed as this item has not been indexed. Please try again later." Found forum posts that said give the Kindle at least 10 minutes to complete indexing the file. . .longer if file if big. Sure enough, about 30 minutes later I tried again and was able to search this large PDF.

    8/29/10 update:
    - Just got back from Starbucks
    * Turned wi-fi on
    * Menu > Settings > Wifi Settings and selected the attwifi network option
    * Home > Menu > Experimental > Launch browser
    * zoom in on the terms & agreement checkbox and use the spacebar to check the box
    * click continue button and you are on the internet at the coffee shop!!

    9/3/10 update:
    - A week later, I haven't charged the unit nor shut it down, I've only put it into sleep mode. Battery indicator is still more than 80% full. Nice!
    - Someone pointed me towards "Calibre" a free conversion utility. Totally supports the Kindle 3 and converts to PDF, ePub, Mobi, etc. Works great and you can have the program send the converted document directly to your device via USB or email. The program also acts as your own "backup" by creating a document library on your hard drive that can be sorted, metadata updated, etc. It's very cool!

    9/5/10 update:
    - I kept getting unconverted PDFs (PDFs copied directly to unit via USB vs. sending to email for conversion) would result in the unit restarting when trying to access the PDF. Found forums that said you need to reset the unit. Slide & hold the power button for 15 seconds. Let it take the 20 seconds to reboot. This worked for me.

    9/10/10 update:
    Comments discussion & answers on the following:
    - Annotating PDFs, then accessing these notes for later review on a laptop/desktop
    - Is there an auto-scrolling for PDFs? = No
    - What its like to have the kindle "read" back to you? = robotic voice that ignores punctuation
    - More info on document conversion, including sending emails to the kindle for conversion?
    - The ability to access Gmail from the kindle? = yes, works fine though a bit slow on wi-fi

    9/19/10 update:
    - Check out the comments for my answer to, "Should I buy 3G or is wifi good enough?" = need to buy a book on the run, then get 3G. If you can wait till you get home or a coffee shop, then wi-fi works fine.

    9/24/10 update:
    Comments discussion & answers on the following:
    - Exactly how does an Audible audio book work with the Kindle?
    - Possible causes for why MP3 music is not recognized by the device?

    10/2/10 update:
    Comments discussion & answers on the following:
    - Can you play Audible audio books while at the same time reading along? = for all intents and purposes, no
    - How easy is it to register a new/used K3 to a different owner? = easy as pie

    10/23/10 update:
    Comments discussion & answers on the following:
    - Can you change out the battery yourself? = no
    - Can you share your documents with other kindle users? = legally only if both devices are under the same user account

    12/7/10 update:
    Comments discussion & answers on the following:
    - Can a color document show up as color on the kindle? = No, doc will be converted to greyscale
    - Able to support textbooks? = Yes, if in a supported document type
    - Should I pay the extra $50 for 3G in order to more easily access websites? = Up to you...many sites have mobile versions that load great on wi-fi. NOTE: still doesn't support sites that use Java
    - Will I have 3G coverage in my rural area? = Amazon gives a disclaimer in their FAQ that 3G connection is not guaranteed in some areas
    - Should I get the K3 for my 10 year old? = I personally feel this is a great device for any age reader. . .and gives the parent control/visibility to what is being read

    5-0 out of 5 stars Kindle vs. Nook (updated 12/1/2010), August 28, 2010
    If you're trying to choose between a Nook and a Kindle, perhaps I can help. My wife and I have owned a Nook (the original one, not the new Nook Color), a Kindle 2, and a Kindle DX. When Amazon announced the Kindle 3 this summer, we pre-ordered two Kindle 3's: the wi-fi only model in graphite, and the wi-fi + 3G model in white. They arrived in late August and we have used them very regularly since then. For us, Kindle is better than Nook, but Nook is a good device with its own advantages that I will discuss below. I'll end this review with a few words about the Nook Color.

    First, reasons why we prefer the Kindle:

    * Speed

    In our experience, the Kindle is very zippy compared to the Nook. Page refresh speed (the time it takes a new page to appear after you push the page-turn button) was WAY quicker on Kindle 2 than on Nook, and it's quicker yet on Kindle 3. Yet, I read a whole book on the Nook and didn't find the slower page refresh to be annoying - you get used to it, and it's not a problem.

    For me, the more important speed difference concerns navigation - moving the cursor around the screen, for example to pick a book from your library, or to jump to a chapter by selecting it in the table of contents. On Kindle, you do this by pushing a 5-way rocker button, and the cursor moves very quickly. On Nook, you do this by activating the color LCD touchscreen (which normally shuts off when not in use, to conserve battery). A "virtual rocker button" appears on the screen, and you touch it to move the cursor. Unfortunately, the Nook cursor moves very sluggishly. This might not be a big deal to you, but it really got annoying to me, especially since my wife's Kindle was so quick and responsive.

    In November 2010, Nook got a software upgrade that increases page refresh speed and makes navigation more responsive. I returned my Nook months ago, so I cannot tell you if the Nook's performance is now equal to the Kindle's, but Nook owners in the comments section have convinced me that the software update improves the experience of using the Nook. If performance is a big factor in your decision, visit a Best Buy and compare Kindle and Nook side by side.

    * Screen contrast

    You've seen Amazon's claims that the Kindle 3 e-ink has 50% better contrast than Kindle 2 or other e-ink devices. I have no way of precisely measuring the improvement in contrast, but I can tell you that the Kindle 3 display definitely has more contrast than Kindle 2 or Nook. The difference is noticeable, and important: more screen contrast means less eyestrain when reading in poorly lit rooms.

    In well-lit rooms, the Nook and Kindle 2 have enough contrast to allow for comfortable reading. But I often read in low-light conditions, like in bed at night, or in a poorly lit room. In these situations, reading on Nook or Kindle 2 was a bit uncomfortable and often gave me a mild headache. When I got the Kindle 3, the extra contrast was immediately noticeable, and made it more comfortable to read under less-than-ideal lighting conditions. (If you go with a Nook, just make sure you have a good reading lamp nearby.)

    * Battery life

    The Nook's color LCD touch screen drains its battery quickly - I could never get more than 5 days out of a charge. The Kindle 2 had longer battery life than the Nook, and Kindle 3 has even longer life: in the 3 months since we received our Kindle 3's, we typically get 3 weeks of battery life between charges. (We keep wireless off about half the time to save battery power.)

    * Weight

    Nook weighs about 3 ounces more than the new Kindle, and you can really feel the difference. Without a case, Nook is still light enough to hold in one hand for long reading sessions without fatigue. But in a case, Nook is a heavy sucker. The new Kindle 3 is so light, even in a case, we find it comfortable holding in one hand for long reading sessions.

    Reasons some people might prefer the Nook:

    * In-store experience

    If you need help with your nook, you can take it to any barnes and noble and get a real human to help. You can take your nook into the coffee shop section of your local B&N store and read any book for free for up to one hour per day. When you take your nook to B&N, some in-store special deals and the occasional free book pop up on your screen.

    * User-replaceable battery

    Rechargeable batteries eventually lose their ability to hold a charge. Nook's battery is user-replaceable and relatively inexpensive. To replace Kindle's battery, Amazon wants you to ship your Kindle to Amazon, and they will ship you back a DIFFERENT Kindle than the one you sent (it's the same model, for example if you send a white Kindle 3, you get a white Kindle 3 back, but you get a "refurbished" one, NOT the exact one you sent them). I don't like this at all.

    However, several people have posted comments here that have eased my concerns. Someone looked up statistics on the Kindle's battery and did some simple calculations to show that it should last for 3 or more years. Before that happens, I will surely have upgraded to a newer Kindle model by then. Also, someone found some companies that sell Kindle batteries at reasonable cost and have how-to videos that demonstrate how we can replace the battery ourselves. Doing this would void the Kindle's warranty, but the battery will probably not fail until long after the warranty expires.

    * ePub

    Nook uses the ePub format, a widely used open format. Amazon uses a proprietary ebook format. Many libraries will "lend" ebooks in the ePub format, which works with nook but not kindle. However, a free and reputable program called Calibre allows you to translate ebooks from one format to another - it supports many formats, including ePub and Kindle. The only catch is that it doesn't work with copy-protected ebooks, so you can't, for example, buy a Kindle book (which is copy protected) and translate it to ePub so you can read it on a Nook.

    * lending e-books to friends

    Nook owners can "loan" ebooks they purchased to other nook owners for up to two weeks. You can't do this with kindle - yet. Amazon has announced it will soon add this lending feature to all kindles (via a software update that will be available to people who already own kindles).

    * Nook's color LCD touchscreen

    This could be a pro or con, depending on your preferences. It makes nook hipper and less drab than kindle. Some people enjoy using the color LCD to view their library or navigate. I did, at first. But after two weeks of use, and comparisons with my wife's kindle, I found the dedicated buttons of the kindle easier and far quicker to use than the nook's color touchscreen. I also found the bright light from the color screen distracting when I was trying to read a book or newspaper (though when not in use, it shuts off after a minute or so to conserve battery).

    * expandable capacity

    Nook comes with 2GB of internal memory. If you need more capacity, you can insert a microSD card to add up to 16GB more memory. Kindle comes with 4GB of internal memory - twice as much as Nook - but there's no way to expand that. Kindle doesn't accept memory cards of any type. If you mainly use your device to read ebooks and newspapers, this shouldn't be an issue. I have over 100 books on my Kindle, and I've used only a tiny fraction of the memory. Once Kindle's memory fills up, just delete books you don't need immediate access to; you can always restore them later, in seconds, for free.

    A few other notes:

    Kindle and Nook have other features, such as an MP3 player and a web browser, but I caution you to have low expectations for these features. The MP3 player on the Kindle is like the first-generation iPod shuffle - you can't see what song is playing, and you can't navigate to other songs on your device. I don't like the browser on either device; e-ink is just not a good technology for surfing the web; it's slower and clunkier than LCD screen technology, so even the browser on an Android phone or iPod touch is more enjoyable to use. However, some commenters have more favorable views of either device's browser, and you might, too.

    * PDF support

    Kindle and Nook both handle PDF files, but in different ways. When you put a PDF file on your nook, nook converts it into an ebook-like file, then you can adjust the font size, and the text and pagination will adjust just like with any ebook. But you cannot see the original PDF file in the native format in which it was created. Kindle 3 and Kindle DX have native support for PDF files. You can see PDF files just as they would appear on your computer. You can also convert PDF files to an ebook-like format, and then Kindle handles them just the way the Nook handles them - text and pagination adjust when you change the font size. Unfortunately, some symbols, equations, and graphics get lost or mangled in the translation - even when viewing PDF files in their native format on the Kindle. Moreover, the small screen size of the Kindle 3 and the Nook is not great for PDF files, most of which are designed for a larger page size. You can zoom and pan, but this is cumbersome and tiresome. Thanks to commenters who suggested viewing PDF files in landscape mode on the Kindle (I don't know if you can do this on Nook); this way, you can see the entire top half of the page without panning, and then scroll down to the bottom half. This works a little better.

    SUMMARY:

    Nook and Kindle each offer their own advantages. We like the nook's user-replaceable battery, compatibility with ePub format, and in-store experience. But we strongly prefer Kindle 3 because its performance is zippier, its higher-contrast screen is easier to read, and it's smaller and lighter so it is more portable and more comfortable to hold in one hand for long reading sessions.

    * Nook Color

    Everything I wrote about the Nook in this review applies to the original Nook (which continues to be available), not the new Nook Color. To me, the Nook Color is in a different product category than the Kindle or original Nook. Nook Color has an LCD screen, like an iPad or most computer monitors. Reading on a computer screen for long periods of time is not comfortable for me - it causes fatigue and headaches. The e-ink Kindle is very comfortable for long reading sessions. So I'll take a pass on the Nook Color. But it will probably be great for others, especially people who want to watch movies, surf the web and play games on their e-reader, and don't mind the extra cost, weight, or lack of 3G. I've seen and played with a Nook Color at my local B&N, and it is a very attractive device. I'm looking forward to reading user reviews of the Nook Color when people start getting them. If you get one, please post a comment to let us know how you like it.

    3-0 out of 5 stars Worth the money. Not perfect, but very very good for start to finish novels in good light, August 31, 2010
    The Kindle is my first e-ink reader. I own an iPad, an iPhone, and have owned a Windows-based phone in the past that I used as an ereader.

    My overall impression of the device is good.

    The good:
    I'd honestly rather read linear (read from page one to the end, one page at a time) fiction from it than a book, because I can't always get comfortable with a book. Hardcovers are sometimes a bit heavy, and paperbacks don't always lie open easily. The Kindle is incredibly light and thin. I can hold it in one hand easily. The page turn buttons are conveniently located. Page-turns aren't instant, but they're probably quicker than turning a physical page in a printed book (there are just a lot more page-turns unless you choose a small font). The contrast is better than other ereaders I've seen. There is zero eye strain in good light. My eyesight isn't the greatest and I like being able to increase the font size and read without glasses. I love being able to browse the Kindle store and read samples before deciding to purchase. The "experimental" browser is surprisingly usable, but isn't great. It is useful for browsing wikipedia and blogs. The biggest drawback to the browser is the awkward pointer navigation, using the 5-way pad. It syncs your furthest read page over the internet so you can pick up where you left off using your iPhone or iPad.

    The so-so:
    The kindle store could use more categories and sorting options. You can't sort by "top rated," and there is no category for "alternate histories," for example. Finding a very-specific type of fiction relies on keyword searches, which don't do a great job. The wifi sometimes doesn't connect before it times-out. You rarely need the wifi, but it is annoying if you change a setting, answer "OK" to the prompt to connect, and the thing tells you it failed to connect two seconds later (the exact moment it indicates that it did finally connect, then you need to go back to update the setting again). Most settings don't require a connection, but it is a minor annoyance. Most of your time will be spent reading, and of course your books are stored on the device and a connection is not required. Part of me wishes I'd bought the 3G model, because the browser is good enough that having lifetime free 3G wireless would be worth the extra money. Magazines don't look very good and are not very easy to navigate. There is minor glare in some lighting conditions, mostly when a lamp is positioned behind the reader's head.

    The bad:
    The contrast is fair to poor in dim light. It is much easier to read a printed page in dim light. In good light, contrast is on par with a pulp paperback. In dim light it feels almost like reading from an old Palm Pilot (resolution is better than an old Palm, but contrast is bad in dim light). The screen is small enough that the frequency of page turns is pretty high. Even in good light, the light gray background is less pleasant than the eggshell background of a printed page. You must tell it to sync before you switch it off, if you expect the feature allowing you to pick up where you left off using other devices to work correctly. The copy protection prevents you from using the files on anything other than Kindle software or devices.

    Vs iPad:
    IPad is a lot better for magazines, reference materials, and illustrated materials. Kindle is worlds better for reading novels. IPad is pretty heavy, making it more difficult to hold in your hand or carry with you everywhere. Kindle is much more portable and easier to hold. IPad has some amazing children's books and magazines, which take advantage of its multimedia features. IPad is unreadable in sunlight and glare is bad in bright light. Kindle is as good as a printed page in bright light. Ipad serves as a creative tool, a computing tool, a gaming tool, and a communication tool. Kindle is only a novel machine. I don't regret buying either one of them. An iPad won't replace books, but a Kindle can, if the book is text-only.

    I highly recommend this device at its new low price if you are a frequent reader of novels. I love my kindle. Just don't expect it to be more than it is. Leave the magazines and such to the tablet computers.

    4-0 out of 5 stars I Wanted a Dedicated E-Reader, and That's What I Got, September 7, 2010
    I'm a first-time Kindle owner, so I have nothing to "compare" the latest Kindle to. I don't own a Nook. I don't own an iPad (and, in any case, that's comparing apples to oranges). I don't have a Sony e-reader. '

    This will be a short, simple review.

    I received my Kindle about a week ago and haven't been able to put it down.

    Things I like about my Kindle?
    1. The e-ink display is amazing.
    2. Using the 5-way controller is simple and effective.
    3. Page turn speeds are faster than I thought they would be.
    4. It's lightweight, even with the attached cover (I have an Amazon cover with a built-in light)
    5. Page-turning buttons are quiet and well-placed.
    6. Recharge time is fast.
    7. I can order a book and start reading it in less than 60 seconds. Nice!
    8. Portability... I can take 3,000 books with me when I travel for work and not require additional suitcases or baggage fees.

    Things I'm not too keen on?
    1. Buttons are too close together and are laid out oddly.
    2. Lack of individual number buttons is frustrating.
    3. Power button on the bottom? Not a bad thing. Just an odd thing. (Same for the headphone input). I usually rest the "bottom" of a book on my lap when I read.

    Things I hope change in the future?
    1. How books are organized... When I put a book in a collection (which is actually a "tag"), it still appears in the main list. It's not actually "moved", it's merely associated.
    2. The look of the main screen. I'd like "folders" or some other way to display "collections".
    3. Ability to create personal "screen savers."
    4. E-book pricing, though Amazon has little control over this. Still, most titles are the same price as or less than their hardback/paperback counterparts. (And I'm not opposed to paying more for convenience and portability).

    Things that don't bother me regarding other reviews?
    1. The browser is experimental. Amazon has created a dedicated e-reader, and it's meant to be used to read. Period. Not browse the web. If you want to browse the web, get a computer -- not an e-reader.
    2. The Kindle is not an mP3 player, either. Yes, it's nice to have some classical music playing in the background while I read, but I don't need to see the title of the song, album art, etc. (And you can skip from track to track on the Kindle using shortcut keys).
    3. Lack of a "color" or "touch" screen.

    In summary, for $139, I'm quite thrilled with my purchase and have arleady read multiple books on it. In fact, I think I've read more in the past week than I've read in the past month.

    5-0 out of 5 stars Not the perfect "do-it-all" device, but very close to being the perfect e-reading device!, August 26, 2010
    I woke up to a nice surprise this morning: a new kindle as a gift. I have an iPad and a Kindle DX, but I guess someone heard my complaints of them being too heavy and difficult to do extended-reading on. Don't get me wrong, I absolutely love my iPad and DX, but this new generation of Kindle is perfect for reading outside and for long periods of time. The iPad gets completely washed out in sunlight and often irritates my eyes staring at it for more than a couple of hours. The DX was my go-to device for those extended/outdoor reading periods, but now I have a new friend for reading novels. Instead of a replacement, this one seems more like a companion to the other devices and is a different class. The iPad works great for web browsing, shopping, productivity, games, etc while the Kindle falls short in those areas. The Kindle works great for reading novels, where the iPad falls short. For those that love to do extended-reading of magazines, newspapers, research articles, etc, I find that the DX is the go-to device.

    Without a doubt, the size and weight of the new kindle is the biggest draw for me. It's smaller than the last edition by a significant margin. I've played around with the Kindle 2 and was impressed, but now looking at the size of the new Kindle, I'm blown away. It's the absolute perfect size. Smaller would be unmanageable and larger wouldn't feel nearly as good. This is a device that you can hold up, read, and just forget that it's there. Compared to other e-readers I've tried, it's much smaller and much lighter.

    One of my biggest complaints about the previous generation Kindles and the DX is the speed. It sometimes takes a while after you push `next page' for it to actually change. In addition, the web browsing feature was so slow and clunky that it is really unusable in my opinion. Two additions to the new Kindle have helped attenuate these issues. First, the pages do flip quicker (albeit, still slow in my opinion), and the addition of wifi has allowed faster connection for wireless activities (much better than only relying on 3G). I still can't see myself using the Kindle as an internet browsing tool or really doing much online aside from purchasing reading material, but the faster connection at least opens up the possibility - something that would only frustrate me on previous editions.

    The new Kindle also offers a better contrast than previous editions and it looks fantastic compared to every other e-reader I have seen. I have no trouble seeing the screen in dim light or in bright sunlight - it really opens up the ability to read almost anywhere you are. Of course, you'll still need a separate light for extremely dark areas.

    Another big addition to the Kindle 3 is that it offers double the storage compared to Kindle 2. I've never had a problem with the amount of storage since I can't possibly see myself filling up that much space (I don't put mp3's on it), but perhaps in the future, if certain applications or media files are put on the kindle, it could have been a problem. The additional space in the new model is definitely a welcome addition, but bringing back the memory card slot that was included on Kindle 1 would have been an even more welcome addition in my opinion.

    Among e-readers, I definitely recommend the Kindle 3 if not just because it has a better size/form-factor, contrast, battery life, and speed compared to every other e-reader I have tried. On top of that, you get the wonderful amazon buying experience and selection for all your literature and can keep your kindle library intact between whatever other device you want to download a Kindle application onto.

    The question of whether you need a Kindle vs another type of device for reading becomes a little more tricky and really comes down to what you want to use it for.

    Do you want a device to read novels on, perhaps read outside, and have something very light that you almost forget it's there? Buy the Kindle.

    Do you want something to lie in bed with for short periods of time while surfing the web? I might suggest going with the iPad, a different tablet, or a netbook.

    Do you already have a Kindle 1 or 2? That's a tough one.... I don't think the new edition has enough `new' to it to warrant the upgrade in my mind, but some might value the new size and wifi capabilities even more-so than I do. For me, the new Kindle was a welcome addition to my family of devices since I didn't have anything anywhere near its form factor and convenience.

    Should you get 3G + Wifi or just Wifi? I think this question can be answered simply by asking yourself if you travel a lot. Being able to buy books and access wireless content on the road is an indispensable option and well worth the extra money in my mind. Keeping the device mainly at home or near wifi hotspots really negates the need for 3G though.

    Overall, I have to give the Kindle a 5 star rating because it does what it was designed to do very well, and in my opinion better than any of the competition. While the new features and capabilities aren't game-changing and truly outstanding, it is smaller, more capable, and better than any other e-reader out there. If you want `one device to handle it all', this isn't the place to look, but If you want a fantastic device solely for reading books, this is what you want.

    5-0 out of 5 stars A hesistant buyer rejoices on his choice, September 2, 2010
    I researched the purchase of a Kindle for a long time. I couldn't decide whether or not it was worth buying a dedicated e-reader. Boy am I glad I made this purchase. The downside to Amazon's online selling of Kindle 3 is that the customers don't get to see it in person. It is much better in person. This may sound stupid, but when I got my new Kindle, I thought there was a stuck-on overlay on the screen containing a diagram of the unit's buttons, etc. I actually tried to peel it off. Doh! The e-ink on this unit is THAT good. I didn't realize that I was staring at the actual display. I also didn't realize that no power is required until the display changes. (thus the great battery life) I do a lot of reading, but was facing the prospect of reading less or buying large type books because of my variable and deteriorating eyesight. The new Kindle has been a godsend. Now, I can decide the size of type I need depending on my level of fatigue among other things. The weight and ergonomics are very good. For someone, like me, with neuropathy in his hands, it is extremely easy to manage and enjoyable to own. To me, it is easier to read than print books. The ease of navigation is great as is the speed. The battery life, so far, has been extraordinary. It easily connected to our home Wi-Fi, which by design does not broadcast an SSID. It downloads books so fast that I almost thought they were not completely received. I did not buy the 3G version because of the price difference and the fact that there is no coverage where I live. If you are not constantly traveling, I don't see the need to spend the extra bucks, but that is a matter of personal choice. For those who have no Wi-Fi at home, remember that you can always download the material to your computer and transfer it via USB. Just today I was watching an interview with Tony Blair on TV. He was talking about his new book, which sounded interesting. I picked up the Kindle and downloaded a free sample before the interview was over. I have only read the preface so far, but will probably buy the book. Now THAT is a great way to buy a book! I haven't used online browsing extensively yet, but find it reasonable for what the device is. This is primarily a book reader, not a laptop or notebook. They are great for what they do, but can't match the e-ink display, or the light weight. For those of you worrying about the wait for the new Kindle, let me end with, "It is worth the wait" This new Kindle is all about the quality of experience. There are many format choices for electronic reading. If you want the best experience, go with the Kindle.

    5-0 out of 5 stars Solid Improvements! Check out my video review!, August 27, 2010
    I just received my new Kindle, and my early impressions are very positive - it's definitely a solid step up from the previous generation Kindle. Check out my video review to see/hear more!

    UPDATE 9/7/2010: Hey guys - based on the comments received there are definitely some questions that people are interested in that I didn't touch on in my video review - so I wanted to take some time to answer some of those questions here. Hopefully this is helpful!

    Q: Is the Kindle 3 backlit? If not, then how do you see it at night?

    A: The Kindle 3 is not backlit. For the Kindle 2 I used a leather case with a reading light clipped to it. For the Kindle 3 Amazon produced a leather case that has a built-in reading light. I've been using it since day 1 and I love it. I made a video review for that also if you want to check it out:

    http://www.amazon.com/review/R27V1SXQSI9M86/

    Q: How well does the new joystick control work?

    A: The new Kindle replaces the old five-way navigation joystick with a center button surrounded by a thin 4-way directional control. After messing around with both of these approaches, I don't really have a strong personal preference one way or another - they both work fine for me.

    If you have big hands then I can definitely see having a bit of trouble getting used to the new joystick. The directional control is very thin, and if you're going to have trouble with any button on the Kindle... that's definitely going to be the one.

    Q: How is viewing PDFs on the Kindle 3? Are they easy to upload onto the Kindle?

    A: Uploading PDFs to the Kindle is very easy. You just connect your Kindle to your computer via USB cable and then drag and drop the PDFs. Totally simple. Viewing them is pretty decent, but the major problem is that most PDFs aren't designed for a 6 inch screen. You might have to do a lot of zooming and panning to see the content you want. If you plan on viewing a ton of PDFs, then you may want to check out the Kindle DX Wireless Reading Device, Free 3G, 9.7" Display, Graphite, 3G Works Globally  Latest Generation.

    Q: How well does the text-to-speech work?

    A: It's ok. You definitely won't mistake it for a professionally produced audiobook, but it doesn't sound as bad as you may think it will. Also note that text-to-speech is not available for every book. You can see on the product page for each Kindle book if text-to-speech is enabled or not.

    5-0 out of 5 stars K3 is perfect, August 28, 2010
    When I first unboxed the new K3, I was slightly disappointed. The new 5-way appeared to be harder to used than the little joystick of the K2. I have to say, though, two days later, I'm liking it much better. Since I'm getting used to it so quickly, I think in another day I won't know the difference.

    The size is absolutely perfect. In the Amazon cover, it is exactly like reading from a paperback book. It's noticeably lighter and easier to hold for reading, even with arthritis in my hands. The page turn buttons are wonderful. Almost no noise, and you don't have to push them as hard. It should make it much easier for those with weak or disabled hands. I also like have next page and previous buttons on both sides. I didn't think it would make a difference to me, but it really does.

    I tried a couple of times to connect the WiFi, but didn't get it to work. Today I had more time so I thought I'd try to puzzle through it. But when I navigated to the wireless menu, it had somehow figured out how to connect on its own. The browser is MUCH faster, and it made buying a book a breeze.

    I haven't had it long enough to comment on the extended battery life. But I was honestly fine with the more than 10 days I always got with K2.

    And the FONTS! My word what a difference! I can practically read in the dark! I've been able to reduce the font size from 4 to 2. Combine sharper contrast with better fonts and it's an unbeatable combo.

    The ONLY thing I would change if I could is to move the Menu button, and especially the Back button. I'm having a little trouble navigating with the down arrow because I hit Back. But I'm starting to get the hang of it.

    All in all, I think Amazon hit it out of the park with the K3!

    5-0 out of 5 stars K3 Even Better than its Predecessor, August 28, 2010
    It's no longer necessary to write about how desirable the Kindle is (or, for that matter, e-readers generally). Books and text and reading are with us to stay; only paper is becoming unnecessary. What we can discuss is how well a device performs its intended task(s), and how it compares to its competition on an absolute basis and for the price.

    My wife and I share a last gen 6" Kindle and just received a new 6" display K3. I know, Amazon doesn't call it that, but how else can users refer to it? In twenty words or less, it is an improvement over an already excellent product. Smaller, but not too small to be held comfortably. Same size display, but sharper and crisper, better contrast. Easy to use, somewhat smaller keyboard that takes a little, but very little, getting used to. It took me a few hours to stop accidentally pressing some neighboring keys, but now using the keyboard is second nature. And the page turning buttons are silent, but have sufficient tactile feedback, excellent feel.

    I found it very easy to duplicate our library from our older Kindle to our new K3, and to activate our home wifi. I don't like to say I "transferred" our books because that could be understood to mean they were taken from our old Kindle to our new one. I say "duplicate" because they reside on both Kindles. The instruction manual is detailed and somewhat lengthy, but very understandable. (It's 200 pages, but don't let that scare you; it's easy to find the parts you need, and you will never need more than a few pages at one time.) The manual is published on the device, as in the past, and can also be downloaded to your computer as a pdf file so you can read the instructions from your computer as you apply them to the K3.

    If you have wifi at home, which we do, when you are in range of a wifi that you have activated in your K3, it automatically uses that wifi, instead of connecting to the 3G AT&T network, assuming, of course, you have a 3G+wifi K3. It works faster on my home wifi than on the 3G network, so much so that if I had really thought it through before I bought it, or if I were to buy another, I would probably go wifi only and save $50. The only reasons to get the 3G+wifi model would seem to be if you don't have reliable access to wifi or if you travel a good deal to places that don't have a lot of wifi access, but do have AT&T connectivity AND you have need to download books or periodicals on a regular basis or without delay while you are away from home or office. If you can plan ahead and stock up on a few good books, and you have reliable access to wifi, such as at home/office, McDonalds or Starbucks, I suggest you think twice about whether you want the 3G+wifi K3, or the wifi only.

    Each K3 has its own email address and you can send documents to it, including Word and pdf docs, and photos. Of course, the photos are B&W, but very detailed and clear. The K3 permits surfing the web, although I haven't used it much for that purpose and, other than saying it works, I hesitate to pass judgment on how well I think someone who uses it for web browsing would like it.

    I can't compare it to other dedicated e-readers because I haven't used them. People seem to be interested in how I think it compares to the iPad, which I don't own but have "played with" somewhat extensively at the Apple Store. My assessment is that there is no comparison. The iPad will do much more, but as an e-reader I think the K3 is superior. I don't need color for reading text, the K3 is a fraction of the cost, and its smaller size makes it much more convenient to tote around. However, what kills the iPad as an e-reader, as far as I am concerned, is its weight. I suspect most of us are the same in this regard, but I tend to read for an hour or two at a stretch. A pound and a half doesn't sound too heavy, but I held an iPad for five minutes, literally, and my hands ached. It is simply too heavy to use as a book reading device, while the K3 is light as a feather. For reading, a cheaper and significantly lighter K3 as a dedicated e-reader is, IMHO, the way to go (compared to an iPad). BTW, a recent (in Aug. 2010) report from Taiwan said Apple in making a 6" iPod, which, depending on size and weight, could change the equation. It will be interesting to see how the e-reader market develops. I said I can't compare the K3 to other competitors, and I won't, but I can say I am completely satisfied with Amazon as an e-book seller. I've only had a few occasions to need support (on my old Kindle), but that has also been entirely satisfactory.

    Bottom line: my wife and I both like the K3 very much and recommend it to anyone considering buying an e-reader. I don't think you will regret buying one, with or without the free 3G.

    1-0 out of 5 stars Quality control problems, September 7, 2010
    First, the good stuff. Kindle 3 has a very readable high contrast screen. The form factor is small and light enough to be a book replacement. Purchasing and downloading content is simple and convenient.

    However, I had a series of problems which eventually led me to return my Kindle.

    After unpacking and charging my Kindle 3, it refused to connect to my wireless network. I have a variety of other devices ranging from a Nintendo Wii to an iPod Touch and two computers that work just fine on my wireless network, but the Kindle couldn't connect after many attempts. I eventually gave up and turned it off. When I turned it back on several hours later, it had mysteriously connected to my WiFi network with the exact same settings that did not work earlier. I have noticed that several other users have ran into the same problem.

    The next problem I noticed was that something was rolling around inside the casing. This is obviously not a good sign. Then, my Kindle 3 started freezing. The first freeze happened while using the experimental browser. As this is an "experimental" application, I wasn't too concerned. After a power reset, the Kindle came back up. The second freeze happened while playing Shuffled Row, which is a good game. After this freeze, my Kindle refused to reboot after many power reset attempts. (Yes, I did try keeping the power switch in the "turn-on" position for up to 30 seconds as suggested by the manual.) I eventually gave up and put it down. However, after a few minutes, the Kindle started to reboot itself. The was another freeze while reading a book, which was fixed with a power reset. I tried to contact Amazon for service, but it looks like the only way to get Kindle customer service is through a phone call.

    And then my Kindle froze again while reading a book. This time, nothing would reset the kindle. When this last freeze happened, the battery was charged about 75%. At this point, there was no option but to return the kindle. There are some comments among the negative reviews here that the usual Amazon.com return process does not work. In my case, I was able to follow the regular Amazon return process and print a return label. So my Kindle is back to Amazon after less than a week of use.

    Judging from other reviews that had similar experiences as mine, Amazon appears to have a specific quality control problem with this latest version of the Kindle. People may be more tolerant of the reliability other electronic gadgets, however, it is unacceptable for a product that is primarily intended to replace paper books to have issues like freezing and/or rebooting. After all, I never had a "paper" book freeze or reboot on me so far. Receiving a product with defects that should have been caught during testing before shipping pretty much destroys the "Kindle experience".

    UPDATE (October 31, 2010): Since I do like the Kindle concept, after reading about the improvement in stability with the latest software upgrades, I purchased another Kindle WiFi. Everything was great for almost two weeks, no crashes. However, yesterday, the second Kindle also ended up with a frozen screen. After following through the instructions on Amazon's Kindle troubleshooting page and talking to the customer service, there was no way to get the Kindle out of the frozen state, so this one is also going back. The fact that this situation can happen to the same customer twice in a matter of few months indicates either a serious quality control problem or component reliability problem.

    5-0 out of 5 stars Details on working with PDF, Wi-fi vs 3G, Starbucks, Audio books, MP3 and other things, August 27, 2010
    NOTE: Amazon limits the video size and duration, so I targeted what I thought were some key points.
    I check comments, so leave one if you have any questions not covered in the video or below and I'll try and answer.

    First off I love this device!!
    Like ipods are the king of MP3 players, this is the king of ebook readers in my opinion.

    I've been looking at this thing for at least 7+ hrs today and my eyes don't feel tired at all.

    If you want. . .
    * a low cost eBook reader
    * that allows you to read books
    * looks great
    * easy to setup
    * easy to hold/carry
    * easy on the eyes (no getting tired eyes from a glaring screen)
    . . . then look no further than this product!



    **Adding updates as I find other feature behaviors**

    - The comic I converted to PDF when emailed to my kindle email address the conversion process didn't like it too much. Better to not use the conversion process for those types of PDFs. Other PDF's converted just fine.
    - Emailing PDF = the conversion process seems to cut off the cover page each time
    - Emailing and having amazon convert is fast. I like it!
    - You can plug the kindle into the USB, then "eject" it from the OS. This allows you to continue to charge the kindle and read it at the same time. You could also just plug it into an electrical socket and read from it too.
    - If you stop/pause your MP3 music it will start all the way back at track #1. This is not an MP3 player. It also plays the most recently added track first
    - 10 minutes it goes into sleep mode, but if you leave Wi-fi on = drains your battery quicker. Better to turn Wi-fi off when not using it
    - Buy a case to protect it and get yourself a light for times when you don't have enough light to read by. This is not a cell-phone screen, meaning you can't read it in the dark. The screen very much simulates paper in this case.
    - Manual even states...you cannot connect the Wi-fi to a corporate wi-fi. Most companies require VPN of some sort, which is not supported here.
    - Loaded a 25Mb PDF and when when trying to search I get the following error message, ""your search can not be completed as this item has not been indexed. Please try again later." Found forum posts that said give the Kindle at least 10 minutes to complete indexing the file. . .longer if file if big. Sure enough, about 30 minutes later I tried again and was able to search this large PDF.

    8/29/10 update:
    - Just got back from Starbucks
    * Turned wi-fi on
    * Menu > Settings > Wifi Settings and selected the attwifi network option
    * Home > Menu > Experimental > Launch browser
    * zoom in on the terms & agreement checkbox and use the spacebar to check the box
    * click continue button and you are on the internet at the coffee shop!!

    9/3/10 update:
    - A week later, I haven't charged the unit nor shut it down, I've only put it into sleep mode. Battery indicator is still more than 80% full. Nice!
    - Someone pointed me towards "Calibre" a free conversion utility. Totally supports the Kindle 3 and converts to PDF, ePub, Mobi, etc. Works great and you can have the program send the converted document directly to your device via USB or email. The program also acts as your own "backup" by creating a document library on your hard drive that can be sorted, metadata updated, etc. It's very cool!

    9/5/10 update:
    - I kept getting unconverted PDFs (PDFs copied directly to unit via USB vs. sending to email for conversion) would result in the unit restarting when trying to access the PDF. Found forums that said you need to reset the unit. Slide & hold the power button for 15 seconds. Let it take the 20 seconds to reboot. This worked for me.

    9/10/10 update:
    Comments discussion & answers on the following:
    - Annotating PDFs, then accessing these notes for later review on a laptop/desktop
    - Is there an auto-scrolling for PDFs? = No
    - What its like to have the kindle "read" back to you? = robotic voice that ignores punctuation
    - More info on document conversion, including sending emails to the kindle for conversion?
    - The ability to access Gmail from the kindle? = yes, works fine though a bit slow on wi-fi

    9/19/10 update:
    - Check out the comments for my answer to, "Should I buy 3G or is wifi good enough?" = need to buy a book on the run, then get 3G. If you can wait till you get home or a coffee shop, then wi-fi works fine.

    9/24/10 update:
    Comments discussion & answers on the following:
    - Exactly how does an Audible audio book work with the Kindle?
    - Possible causes for why MP3 music is not recognized by the device?

    10/2/10 update:
    Comments discussion & answers on the following:
    - Can you play Audible audio books while at the same time reading along? = for all intents and purposes, no
    - How easy is it to register a new/used K3 to a different owner? = easy as pie

    10/23/10 update:
    Comments discussion & answers on the following:
    - Can you change out the battery yourself? = no
    - Can you share your documents with other kindle users? = legally only if both devices are under the same user account

    12/7/10 update:
    Comments discussion & answers on the following:
    - Can a color document show up as color on the kindle? = No, doc will be converted to greyscale
    - Able to support textbooks? = Yes, if in a supported document type
    - Should I pay the extra $50 for 3G in order to more easily access websites? = Up to you...many sites have mobile versions that load great on wi-fi. NOTE: still doesn't support sites that use Java
    - Will I have 3G coverage in my rural area? = Amazon gives a disclaimer in their FAQ that 3G connection is not guaranteed in some areas
    - Should I get the K3 for my 10 year old? = I personally feel this is a great device for any age reader. . .and gives the parent control/visibility to what is being read
    Read more


    3. Kindle 3G Wireless Reading Device, Free 3G + Wi-Fi, 3G Works Globally, White, 6" Display with New E Ink Pearl Technology
    Electronics
    list price: $189.00 -- our price: $189.00
    (price subject to change: see help)
    Asin: B002LVUX1W
    Manufacturer: Amazon.com
    Sales Rank: 3
    Average Customer Review: 4.4 out of 5 stars
    US | Canada | United Kingdom | Germany | France | Japan

    Editorial Review

    The all-new Kindle has a new electronic-ink screen with 50 percent better contrast than any other e-reader, a new sleek design with a 21 percent smaller body while still keeping the same 6-inch-size reading area, and a 15 percent lighter weight at just 8.7 ounces.  The new Kindle also offers 20 percent faster page turns, up to one month of battery life, double the storage to 3,500 books, built-in Wi-Fi, a graphite color option and more—all for only $189, and still with free 3G wireless—no monthly bills or annual contracts.

    ... Read more

    Reviews

    5-0 out of 5 stars Kindle vs. Nook (updated 12/1/2010)
    If you're trying to choose between a Nook and a Kindle, perhaps I can help. My wife and I have owned a Nook (the original one, not the new Nook Color), a Kindle 2, and a Kindle DX. When Amazon announced the Kindle 3 this summer, we pre-ordered two Kindle 3's: the wi-fi only model in graphite, and the wi-fi + 3G model in white. They arrived in late August and we have used them very regularly since then. For us, Kindle is better than Nook, but Nook is a good device with its own advantages that I will discuss below. I'll end this review with a few words about the Nook Color.

    First, reasons why we prefer the Kindle:

    * Speed

    In our experience, the Kindle is very zippy compared to the Nook. Page refresh speed (the time it takes a new page to appear after you push the page-turn button) was WAY quicker on Kindle 2 than on Nook, and it's quicker yet on Kindle 3. Yet, I read a whole book on the Nook and didn't find the slower page refresh to be annoying - you get used to it, and it's not a problem.

    For me, the more important speed difference concerns navigation - moving the cursor around the screen, for example to pick a book from your library, or to jump to a chapter by selecting it in the table of contents. On Kindle, you do this by pushing a 5-way rocker button, and the cursor moves very quickly. On Nook, you do this by activating the color LCD touchscreen (which normally shuts off when not in use, to conserve battery). A "virtual rocker button" appears on the screen, and you touch it to move the cursor. Unfortunately, the Nook cursor moves very sluggishly. This might not be a big deal to you, but it really got annoying to me, especially since my wife's Kindle was so quick and responsive.

    In November 2010, Nook got a software upgrade that increases page refresh speed and makes navigation more responsive. I returned my Nook months ago, so I cannot tell you if the Nook's performance is now equal to the Kindle's, but Nook owners in the comments section have convinced me that the software update improves the experience of using the Nook. If performance is a big factor in your decision, visit a Best Buy and compare Kindle and Nook side by side.

    * Screen contrast

    You've seen Amazon's claims that the Kindle 3 e-ink has 50% better contrast than Kindle 2 or other e-ink devices. I have no way of precisely measuring the improvement in contrast, but I can tell you that the Kindle 3 display definitely has more contrast than Kindle 2 or Nook. The difference is noticeable, and important: more screen contrast means less eyestrain when reading in poorly lit rooms.

    In well-lit rooms, the Nook and Kindle 2 have enough contrast to allow for comfortable reading. But I often read in low-light conditions, like in bed at night, or in a poorly lit room. In these situations, reading on Nook or Kindle 2 was a bit uncomfortable and often gave me a mild headache. When I got the Kindle 3, the extra contrast was immediately noticeable, and made it more comfortable to read under less-than-ideal lighting conditions. (If you go with a Nook, just make sure you have a good reading lamp nearby.)

    * Battery life

    The Nook's color LCD touch screen drains its battery quickly - I could never get more than 5 days out of a charge. The Kindle 2 had longer battery life than the Nook, and Kindle 3 has even longer life: in the 3 months since we received our Kindle 3's, we typically get 3 weeks of battery life between charges. (We keep wireless off about half the time to save battery power.)

    * Weight

    Nook weighs about 3 ounces more than the new Kindle, and you can really feel the difference. Without a case, Nook is still light enough to hold in one hand for long reading sessions without fatigue. But in a case, Nook is a heavy sucker. The new Kindle 3 is so light, even in a case, we find it comfortable holding in one hand for long reading sessions.

    Reasons some people might prefer the Nook:

    * In-store experience

    If you need help with your nook, you can take it to any barnes and noble and get a real human to help. You can take your nook into the coffee shop section of your local B&N store and read any book for free for up to one hour per day. When you take your nook to B&N, some in-store special deals and the occasional free book pop up on your screen.

    * User-replaceable battery

    Rechargeable batteries eventually lose their ability to hold a charge. Nook's battery is user-replaceable and relatively inexpensive. To replace Kindle's battery, Amazon wants you to ship your Kindle to Amazon, and they will ship you back a DIFFERENT Kindle than the one you sent (it's the same model, for example if you send a white Kindle 3, you get a white Kindle 3 back, but you get a "refurbished" one, NOT the exact one you sent them). I don't like this at all.

    However, several people have posted comments here that have eased my concerns. Someone looked up statistics on the Kindle's battery and did some simple calculations to show that it should last for 3 or more years. Before that happens, I will surely have upgraded to a newer Kindle model by then. Also, someone found some companies that sell Kindle batteries at reasonable cost and have how-to videos that demonstrate how we can replace the battery ourselves. Doing this would void the Kindle's warranty, but the battery will probably not fail until long after the warranty expires.

    * ePub

    Nook uses the ePub format, a widely used open format. Amazon uses a proprietary ebook format. Many libraries will "lend" ebooks in the ePub format, which works with nook but not kindle. However, a free and reputable program called Calibre allows you to translate ebooks from one format to another - it supports many formats, including ePub and Kindle. The only catch is that it doesn't work with copy-protected ebooks, so you can't, for example, buy a Kindle book (which is copy protected) and translate it to ePub so you can read it on a Nook.

    * lending e-books to friends

    Nook owners can "loan" ebooks they purchased to other nook owners for up to two weeks. You can't do this with kindle - yet. Amazon has announced it will soon add this lending feature to all kindles (via a software update that will be available to people who already own kindles).

    * Nook's color LCD touchscreen

    This could be a pro or con, depending on your preferences. It makes nook hipper and less drab than kindle. Some people enjoy using the color LCD to view their library or navigate. I did, at first. But after two weeks of use, and comparisons with my wife's kindle, I found the dedicated buttons of the kindle easier and far quicker to use than the nook's color touchscreen. I also found the bright light from the color screen distracting when I was trying to read a book or newspaper (though when not in use, it shuts off after a minute or so to conserve battery).

    * expandable capacity

    Nook comes with 2GB of internal memory. If you need more capacity, you can insert a microSD card to add up to 16GB more memory. Kindle comes with 4GB of internal memory - twice as much as Nook - but there's no way to expand that. Kindle doesn't accept memory cards of any type. If you mainly use your device to read ebooks and newspapers, this shouldn't be an issue. I have over 100 books on my Kindle, and I've used only a tiny fraction of the memory. Once Kindle's memory fills up, just delete books you don't need immediate access to; you can always restore them later, in seconds, for free.

    A few other notes:

    Kindle and Nook have other features, such as an MP3 player and a web browser, but I caution you to have low expectations for these features. The MP3 player on the Kindle is like the first-generation iPod shuffle - you can't see what song is playing, and you can't navigate to other songs on your device. I don't like the browser on either device; e-ink is just not a good technology for surfing the web; it's slower and clunkier than LCD screen technology, so even the browser on an Android phone or iPod touch is more enjoyable to use. However, some commenters have more favorable views of either device's browser, and you might, too.

    * PDF support

    Kindle and Nook both handle PDF files, but in different ways. When you put a PDF file on your nook, nook converts it into an ebook-like file, then you can adjust the font size, and the text and pagination will adjust just like with any ebook. But you cannot see the original PDF file in the native format in which it was created. Kindle 3 and Kindle DX have native support for PDF files. You can see PDF files just as they would appear on your computer. You can also convert PDF files to an ebook-like format, and then Kindle handles them just the way the Nook handles them - text and pagination adjust when you change the font size. Unfortunately, some symbols, equations, and graphics get lost or mangled in the translation - even when viewing PDF files in their native format on the Kindle. Moreover, the small screen size of the Kindle 3 and the Nook is not great for PDF files, most of which are designed for a larger page size. You can zoom and pan, but this is cumbersome and tiresome. Thanks to commenters who suggested viewing PDF files in landscape mode on the Kindle (I don't know if you can do this on Nook); this way, you can see the entire top half of the page without panning, and then scroll down to the bottom half. This works a little better.

    SUMMARY:

    Nook and Kindle each offer their own advantages. We like the nook's user-replaceable battery, compatibility with ePub format, and in-store experience. But we strongly prefer Kindle 3 because its performance is zippier, its higher-contrast screen is easier to read, and it's smaller and lighter so it is more portable and more comfortable to hold in one hand for long reading sessions.

    * Nook Color

    Everything I wrote about the Nook in this review applies to the original Nook (which continues to be available), not the new Nook Color. To me, the Nook Color is in a different product category than the Kindle or original Nook. Nook Color has an LCD screen, like an iPad or most computer monitors. Reading on a computer screen for long periods of time is not comfortable for me - it causes fatigue and headaches. The e-ink Kindle is very comfortable for long reading sessions. So I'll take a pass on the Nook Color. But it will probably be great for others, especially people who want to watch movies, surf the web and play games on their e-reader, and don't mind the extra cost, weight, or lack of 3G. I've seen and played with a Nook Color at my local B&N, and it is a very attractive device. I'm looking forward to reading user reviews of the Nook Color when people start getting them. If you get one, please post a comment to let us know how you like it.

    3-0 out of 5 stars Worth the money. Not perfect, but very very good for start to finish novels in good light
    The Kindle is my first e-ink reader. I own an iPad, an iPhone, and have owned a Windows-based phone in the past that I used as an ereader.

    My overall impression of the device is good.

    The good:
    I'd honestly rather read linear (read from page one to the end, one page at a time) fiction from it than a book, because I can't always get comfortable with a book. Hardcovers are sometimes a bit heavy, and paperbacks don't always lie open easily. The Kindle is incredibly light and thin. I can hold it in one hand easily. The page turn buttons are conveniently located. Page-turns aren't instant, but they're probably quicker than turning a physical page in a printed book (there are just a lot more page-turns unless you choose a small font). The contrast is better than other ereaders I've seen. There is zero eye strain in good light. My eyesight isn't the greatest and I like being able to increase the font size and read without glasses. I love being able to browse the Kindle store and read samples before deciding to purchase. The "experimental" browser is surprisingly usable, but isn't great. It is useful for browsing wikipedia and blogs. The biggest drawback to the browser is the awkward pointer navigation, using the 5-way pad. It syncs your furthest read page over the internet so you can pick up where you left off using your iPhone or iPad.

    The so-so:
    The kindle store could use more categories and sorting options. You can't sort by "top rated," and there is no category for "alternate histories," for example. Finding a very-specific type of fiction relies on keyword searches, which don't do a great job. The wifi sometimes doesn't connect before it times-out. You rarely need the wifi, but it is annoying if you change a setting, answer "OK" to the prompt to connect, and the thing tells you it failed to connect two seconds later (the exact moment it indicates that it did finally connect, then you need to go back to update the setting again). Most settings don't require a connection, but it is a minor annoyance. Most of your time will be spent reading, and of course your books are stored on the device and a connection is not required. Part of me wishes I'd bought the 3G model, because the browser is good enough that having lifetime free 3G wireless would be worth the extra money. Magazines don't look very good and are not very easy to navigate. There is minor glare in some lighting conditions, mostly when a lamp is positioned behind the reader's head.

    The bad:
    The contrast is fair to poor in dim light. It is much easier to read a printed page in dim light. In good light, contrast is on par with a pulp paperback. In dim light it feels almost like reading from an old Palm Pilot (resolution is better than an old Palm, but contrast is bad in dim light). The screen is small enough that the frequency of page turns is pretty high. Even in good light, the light gray background is less pleasant than the eggshell background of a printed page. You must tell it to sync before you switch it off, if you expect the feature allowing you to pick up where you left off using other devices to work correctly. The copy protection prevents you from using the files on anything other than Kindle software or devices.

    Vs iPad:
    IPad is a lot better for magazines, reference materials, and illustrated materials. Kindle is worlds better for reading novels. IPad is pretty heavy, making it more difficult to hold in your hand or carry with you everywhere. Kindle is much more portable and easier to hold. IPad has some amazing children's books and magazines, which take advantage of its multimedia features. IPad is unreadable in sunlight and glare is bad in bright light. Kindle is as good as a printed page in bright light. Ipad serves as a creative tool, a computing tool, a gaming tool, and a communication tool. Kindle is only a novel machine. I don't regret buying either one of them. An iPad won't replace books, but a Kindle can, if the book is text-only.

    I highly recommend this device at its new low price if you are a frequent reader of novels. I love my kindle. Just don't expect it to be more than it is. Leave the magazines and such to the tablet computers.

    4-0 out of 5 stars I Wanted a Dedicated E-Reader, and That's What I Got
    I'm a first-time Kindle owner, so I have nothing to "compare" the latest Kindle to. I don't own a Nook. I don't own an iPad (and, in any case, that's comparing apples to oranges). I don't have a Sony e-reader. '

    This will be a short, simple review.

    I received my Kindle about a week ago and haven't been able to put it down.

    Things I like about my Kindle?
    1. The e-ink display is amazing.
    2. Using the 5-way controller is simple and effective.
    3. Page turn speeds are faster than I thought they would be.
    4. It's lightweight, even with the attached cover (I have an Amazon cover with a built-in light)
    5. Page-turning buttons are quiet and well-placed.
    6. Recharge time is fast.
    7. I can order a book and start reading it in less than 60 seconds. Nice!
    8. Portability... I can take 3,000 books with me when I travel for work and not require additional suitcases or baggage fees.

    Things I'm not too keen on?
    1. Buttons are too close together and are laid out oddly.
    2. Lack of individual number buttons is frustrating.
    3. Power button on the bottom? Not a bad thing. Just an odd thing. (Same for the headphone input). I usually rest the "bottom" of a book on my lap when I read.

    Things I hope change in the future?
    1. How books are organized... When I put a book in a collection (which is actually a "tag"), it still appears in the main list. It's not actually "moved", it's merely associated.
    2. The look of the main screen. I'd like "folders" or some other way to display "collections".
    3. Ability to create personal "screen savers."
    4. E-book pricing, though Amazon has little control over this. Still, most titles are the same price as or less than their hardback/paperback counterparts. (And I'm not opposed to paying more for convenience and portability).

    Things that don't bother me regarding other reviews?
    1. The browser is experimental. Amazon has created a dedicated e-reader, and it's meant to be used to read. Period. Not browse the web. If you want to browse the web, get a computer -- not an e-reader.
    2. The Kindle is not an mP3 player, either. Yes, it's nice to have some classical music playing in the background while I read, but I don't need to see the title of the song, album art, etc. (And you can skip from track to track on the Kindle using shortcut keys).
    3. Lack of a "color" or "touch" screen.

    In summary, for $139, I'm quite thrilled with my purchase and have arleady read multiple books on it. In fact, I think I've read more in the past week than I've read in the past month.

    5-0 out of 5 stars Not the perfect "do-it-all" device, but very close to being the perfect e-reading device!
    I woke up to a nice surprise this morning: a new kindle as a gift. I have an iPad and a Kindle DX, but I guess someone heard my complaints of them being too heavy and difficult to do extended-reading on. Don't get me wrong, I absolutely love my iPad and DX, but this new generation of Kindle is perfect for reading outside and for long periods of time. The iPad gets completely washed out in sunlight and often irritates my eyes staring at it for more than a couple of hours. The DX was my go-to device for those extended/outdoor reading periods, but now I have a new friend for reading novels. Instead of a replacement, this one seems more like a companion to the other devices and is a different class. The iPad works great for web browsing, shopping, productivity, games, etc while the Kindle falls short in those areas. The Kindle works great for reading novels, where the iPad falls short. For those that love to do extended-reading of magazines, newspapers, research articles, etc, I find that the DX is the go-to device.

    Without a doubt, the size and weight of the new kindle is the biggest draw for me. It's smaller than the last edition by a significant margin. I've played around with the Kindle 2 and was impressed, but now looking at the size of the new Kindle, I'm blown away. It's the absolute perfect size. Smaller would be unmanageable and larger wouldn't feel nearly as good. This is a device that you can hold up, read, and just forget that it's there. Compared to other e-readers I've tried, it's much smaller and much lighter.

    One of my biggest complaints about the previous generation Kindles and the DX is the speed. It sometimes takes a while after you push `next page' for it to actually change. In addition, the web browsing feature was so slow and clunky that it is really unusable in my opinion. Two additions to the new Kindle have helped attenuate these issues. First, the pages do flip quicker (albeit, still slow in my opinion), and the addition of wifi has allowed faster connection for wireless activities (much better than only relying on 3G). I still can't see myself using the Kindle as an internet browsing tool or really doing much online aside from purchasing reading material, but the faster connection at least opens up the possibility - something that would only frustrate me on previous editions.

    The new Kindle also offers a better contrast than previous editions and it looks fantastic compared to every other e-reader I have seen. I have no trouble seeing the screen in dim light or in bright sunlight - it really opens up the ability to read almost anywhere you are. Of course, you'll still need a separate light for extremely dark areas.

    Another big addition to the Kindle 3 is that it offers double the storage compared to Kindle 2. I've never had a problem with the amount of storage since I can't possibly see myself filling up that much space (I don't put mp3's on it), but perhaps in the future, if certain applications or media files are put on the kindle, it could have been a problem. The additional space in the new model is definitely a welcome addition, but bringing back the memory card slot that was included on Kindle 1 would have been an even more welcome addition in my opinion.

    Among e-readers, I definitely recommend the Kindle 3 if not just because it has a better size/form-factor, contrast, battery life, and speed compared to every other e-reader I have tried. On top of that, you get the wonderful amazon buying experience and selection for all your literature and can keep your kindle library intact between whatever other device you want to download a Kindle application onto.

    The question of whether you need a Kindle vs another type of device for reading becomes a little more tricky and really comes down to what you want to use it for.

    Do you want a device to read novels on, perhaps read outside, and have something very light that you almost forget it's there? Buy the Kindle.

    Do you want something to lie in bed with for short periods of time while surfing the web? I might suggest going with the iPad, a different tablet, or a netbook.

    Do you already have a Kindle 1 or 2? That's a tough one.... I don't think the new edition has enough `new' to it to warrant the upgrade in my mind, but some might value the new size and wifi capabilities even more-so than I do. For me, the new Kindle was a welcome addition to my family of devices since I didn't have anything anywhere near its form factor and convenience.

    Should you get 3G + Wifi or just Wifi? I think this question can be answered simply by asking yourself if you travel a lot. Being able to buy books and access wireless content on the road is an indispensable option and well worth the extra money in my mind. Keeping the device mainly at home or near wifi hotspots really negates the need for 3G though.

    Overall, I have to give the Kindle a 5 star rating because it does what it was designed to do very well, and in my opinion better than any of the competition. While the new features and capabilities aren't game-changing and truly outstanding, it is smaller, more capable, and better than any other e-reader out there. If you want `one device to handle it all', this isn't the place to look, but If you want a fantastic device solely for reading books, this is what you want.

    5-0 out of 5 stars A hesistant buyer rejoices on his choice
    I researched the purchase of a Kindle for a long time. I couldn't decide whether or not it was worth buying a dedicated e-reader. Boy am I glad I made this purchase. The downside to Amazon's online selling of Kindle 3 is that the customers don't get to see it in person. It is much better in person. This may sound stupid, but when I got my new Kindle, I thought there was a stuck-on overlay on the screen containing a diagram of the unit's buttons, etc. I actually tried to peel it off. Doh! The e-ink on this unit is THAT good. I didn't realize that I was staring at the actual display. I also didn't realize that no power is required until the display changes. (thus the great battery life) I do a lot of reading, but was facing the prospect of reading less or buying large type books because of my variable and deteriorating eyesight. The new Kindle has been a godsend. Now, I can decide the size of type I need depending on my level of fatigue among other things. The weight and ergonomics are very good. For someone, like me, with neuropathy in his hands, it is extremely easy to manage and enjoyable to own. To me, it is easier to read than print books. The ease of navigation is great as is the speed. The battery life, so far, has been extraordinary. It easily connected to our home Wi-Fi, which by design does not broadcast an SSID. It downloads books so fast that I almost thought they were not completely received. I did not buy the 3G version because of the price difference and the fact that there is no coverage where I live. If you are not constantly traveling, I don't see the need to spend the extra bucks, but that is a matter of personal choice. For those who have no Wi-Fi at home, remember that you can always download the material to your computer and transfer it via USB. Just today I was watching an interview with Tony Blair on TV. He was talking about his new book, which sounded interesting. I picked up the Kindle and downloaded a free sample before the interview was over. I have only read the preface so far, but will probably buy the book. Now THAT is a great way to buy a book! I haven't used online browsing extensively yet, but find it reasonable for what the device is. This is primarily a book reader, not a laptop or notebook. They are great for what they do, but can't match the e-ink display, or the light weight. For those of you worrying about the wait for the new Kindle, let me end with, "It is worth the wait" This new Kindle is all about the quality of experience. There are many format choices for electronic reading. If you want the best experience, go with the Kindle.

    5-0 out of 5 stars Solid Improvements! Check out my video review!
    I just received my new Kindle, and my early impressions are very positive - it's definitely a solid step up from the previous generation Kindle. Check out my video review to see/hear more!

    UPDATE 9/7/2010: Hey guys - based on the comments received there are definitely some questions that people are interested in that I didn't touch on in my video review - so I wanted to take some time to answer some of those questions here. Hopefully this is helpful!

    Q: Is the Kindle 3 backlit? If not, then how do you see it at night?

    A: The Kindle 3 is not backlit. For the Kindle 2 I used a leather case with a reading light clipped to it. For the Kindle 3 Amazon produced a leather case that has a built-in reading light. I've been using it since day 1 and I love it. I made a video review for that also if you want to check it out:

    http://www.amazon.com/review/R27V1SXQSI9M86/

    Q: How well does the new joystick control work?

    A: The new Kindle replaces the old five-way navigation joystick with a center button surrounded by a thin 4-way directional control. After messing around with both of these approaches, I don't really have a strong personal preference one way or another - they both work fine for me.

    If you have big hands then I can definitely see having a bit of trouble getting used to the new joystick. The directional control is very thin, and if you're going to have trouble with any button on the Kindle... that's definitely going to be the one.

    Q: How is viewing PDFs on the Kindle 3? Are they easy to upload onto the Kindle?

    A: Uploading PDFs to the Kindle is very easy. You just connect your Kindle to your computer via USB cable and then drag and drop the PDFs. Totally simple. Viewing them is pretty decent, but the major problem is that most PDFs aren't designed for a 6 inch screen. You might have to do a lot of zooming and panning to see the content you want. If you plan on viewing a ton of PDFs, then you may want to check out the Kindle DX Wireless Reading Device, Free 3G, 9.7" Display, Graphite, 3G Works Globally  Latest Generation.

    Q: How well does the text-to-speech work?

    A: It's ok. You definitely won't mistake it for a professionally produced audiobook, but it doesn't sound as bad as you may think it will. Also note that text-to-speech is not available for every book. You can see on the product page for each Kindle book if text-to-speech is enabled or not.

    5-0 out of 5 stars K3 is perfect
    When I first unboxed the new K3, I was slightly disappointed. The new 5-way appeared to be harder to used than the little joystick of the K2. I have to say, though, two days later, I'm liking it much better. Since I'm getting used to it so quickly, I think in another day I won't know the difference.

    The size is absolutely perfect. In the Amazon cover, it is exactly like reading from a paperback book. It's noticeably lighter and easier to hold for reading, even with arthritis in my hands. The page turn buttons are wonderful. Almost no noise, and you don't have to push them as hard. It should make it much easier for those with weak or disabled hands. I also like have next page and previous buttons on both sides. I didn't think it would make a difference to me, but it really does.

    I tried a couple of times to connect the WiFi, but didn't get it to work. Today I had more time so I thought I'd try to puzzle through it. But when I navigated to the wireless menu, it had somehow figured out how to connect on its own. The browser is MUCH faster, and it made buying a book a breeze.

    I haven't had it long enough to comment on the extended battery life. But I was honestly fine with the more than 10 days I always got with K2.

    And the FONTS! My word what a difference! I can practically read in the dark! I've been able to reduce the font size from 4 to 2. Combine sharper contrast with better fonts and it's an unbeatable combo.

    The ONLY thing I would change if I could is to move the Menu button, and especially the Back button. I'm having a little trouble navigating with the down arrow because I hit Back. But I'm starting to get the hang of it.

    All in all, I think Amazon hit it out of the park with the K3!

    5-0 out of 5 stars K3 Even Better than its Predecessor
    It's no longer necessary to write about how desirable the Kindle is (or, for that matter, e-readers generally). Books and text and reading are with us to stay; only paper is becoming unnecessary. What we can discuss is how well a device performs its intended task(s), and how it compares to its competition on an absolute basis and for the price.

    My wife and I share a last gen 6" Kindle and just received a new 6" display K3. I know, Amazon doesn't call it that, but how else can users refer to it? In twenty words or less, it is an improvement over an already excellent product. Smaller, but not too small to be held comfortably. Same size display, but sharper and crisper, better contrast. Easy to use, somewhat smaller keyboard that takes a little, but very little, getting used to. It took me a few hours to stop accidentally pressing some neighboring keys, but now using the keyboard is second nature. And the page turning buttons are silent, but have sufficient tactile feedback, excellent feel.

    I found it very easy to duplicate our library from our older Kindle to our new K3, and to activate our home wifi. I don't like to say I "transferred" our books because that could be understood to mean they were taken from our old Kindle to our new one. I say "duplicate" because they reside on both Kindles. The instruction manual is detailed and somewhat lengthy, but very understandable. (It's 200 pages, but don't let that scare you; it's easy to find the parts you need, and you will never need more than a few pages at one time.) The manual is published on the device, as in the past, and can also be downloaded to your computer as a pdf file so you can read the instructions from your computer as you apply them to the K3.

    If you have wifi at home, which we do, when you are in range of a wifi that you have activated in your K3, it automatically uses that wifi, instead of connecting to the 3G AT&T network, assuming, of course, you have a 3G+wifi K3. It works faster on my home wifi than on the 3G network, so much so that if I had really thought it through before I bought it, or if I were to buy another, I would probably go wifi only and save $50. The only reasons to get the 3G+wifi model would seem to be if you don't have reliable access to wifi or if you travel a good deal to places that don't have a lot of wifi access, but do have AT&T connectivity AND you have need to download books or periodicals on a regular basis or without delay while you are away from home or office. If you can plan ahead and stock up on a few good books, and you have reliable access to wifi, such as at home/office, McDonalds or Starbucks, I suggest you think twice about whether you want the 3G+wifi K3, or the wifi only.

    Each K3 has its own email address and you can send documents to it, including Word and pdf docs, and photos. Of course, the photos are B&W, but very detailed and clear. The K3 permits surfing the web, although I haven't used it much for that purpose and, other than saying it works, I hesitate to pass judgment on how well I think someone who uses it for web browsing would like it.

    I can't compare it to other dedicated e-readers because I haven't used them. People seem to be interested in how I think it compares to the iPad, which I don't own but have "played with" somewhat extensively at the Apple Store. My assessment is that there is no comparison. The iPad will do much more, but as an e-reader I think the K3 is superior. I don't need color for reading text, the K3 is a fraction of the cost, and its smaller size makes it much more convenient to tote around. However, what kills the iPad as an e-reader, as far as I am concerned, is its weight. I suspect most of us are the same in this regard, but I tend to read for an hour or two at a stretch. A pound and a half doesn't sound too heavy, but I held an iPad for five minutes, literally, and my hands ached. It is simply too heavy to use as a book reading device, while the K3 is light as a feather. For reading, a cheaper and significantly lighter K3 as a dedicated e-reader is, IMHO, the way to go (compared to an iPad). BTW, a recent (in Aug. 2010) report from Taiwan said Apple in making a 6" iPod, which, depending on size and weight, could change the equation. It will be interesting to see how the e-reader market develops. I said I can't compare the K3 to other competitors, and I won't, but I can say I am completely satisfied with Amazon as an e-book seller. I've only had a few occasions to need support (on my old Kindle), but that has also been entirely satisfactory.

    Bottom line: my wife and I both like the K3 very much and recommend it to anyone considering buying an e-reader. I don't think you will regret buying one, with or without the free 3G.

    1-0 out of 5 stars Quality control problems
    First, the good stuff. Kindle 3 has a very readable high contrast screen. The form factor is small and light enough to be a book replacement. Purchasing and downloading content is simple and convenient.

    However, I had a series of problems which eventually led me to return my Kindle.

    After unpacking and charging my Kindle 3, it refused to connect to my wireless network. I have a variety of other devices ranging from a Nintendo Wii to an iPod Touch and two computers that work just fine on my wireless network, but the Kindle couldn't connect after many attempts. I eventually gave up and turned it off. When I turned it back on several hours later, it had mysteriously connected to my WiFi network with the exact same settings that did not work earlier. I have noticed that several other users have ran into the same problem.

    The next problem I noticed was that something was rolling around inside the casing. This is obviously not a good sign. Then, my Kindle 3 started freezing. The first freeze happened while using the experimental browser. As this is an "experimental" application, I wasn't too concerned. After a power reset, the Kindle came back up. The second freeze happened while playing Shuffled Row, which is a good game. After this freeze, my Kindle refused to reboot after many power reset attempts. (Yes, I did try keeping the power switch in the "turn-on" position for up to 30 seconds as suggested by the manual.) I eventually gave up and put it down. However, after a few minutes, the Kindle started to reboot itself. The was another freeze while reading a book, which was fixed with a power reset. I tried to contact Amazon for service, but it looks like the only way to get Kindle customer service is through a phone call.

    And then my Kindle froze again while reading a book. This time, nothing would reset the kindle. When this last freeze happened, the battery was charged about 75%. At this point, there was no option but to return the kindle. There are some comments among the negative reviews here that the usual Amazon.com return process does not work. In my case, I was able to follow the regular Amazon return process and print a return label. So my Kindle is back to Amazon after less than a week of use.

    Judging from other reviews that had similar experiences as mine, Amazon appears to have a specific quality control problem with this latest version of the Kindle. People may be more tolerant of the reliability other electronic gadgets, however, it is unacceptable for a product that is primarily intended to replace paper books to have issues like freezing and/or rebooting. After all, I never had a "paper" book freeze or reboot on me so far. Receiving a product with defects that should have been caught during testing before shipping pretty much destroys the "Kindle experience".

    UPDATE (October 31, 2010): Since I do like the Kindle concept, after reading about the improvement in stability with the latest software upgrades, I purchased another Kindle WiFi. Everything was great for almost two weeks, no crashes. However, yesterday, the second Kindle also ended up with a frozen screen. After following through the instructions on Amazon's Kindle troubleshooting page and talking to the customer service, there was no way to get the Kindle out of the frozen state, so this one is also going back. The fact that this situation can happen to the same customer twice in a matter of few months indicates either a serious quality control problem or component reliability problem.

    5-0 out of 5 stars Details on working with PDF, Wi-fi vs 3G, Starbucks, Audio books, MP3 and other things
    NOTE: Amazon limits the video size and duration, so I targeted what I thought were some key points.
    I check comments, so leave one if you have any questions not covered in the video or below and I'll try and answer.

    First off I love this device!!
    Like ipods are the king of MP3 players, this is the king of ebook readers in my opinion.

    I've been looking at this thing for at least 7+ hrs today and my eyes don't feel tired at all.

    If you want. . .
    * a low cost eBook reader
    * that allows you to read books
    * looks great
    * easy to setup
    * easy to hold/carry
    * easy on the eyes (no getting tired eyes from a glaring screen)
    . . . then look no further than this product!



    **Adding updates as I find other feature behaviors**

    - The comic I converted to PDF when emailed to my kindle email address the conversion process didn't like it too much. Better to not use the conversion process for those types of PDFs. Other PDF's converted just fine.
    - Emailing PDF = the conversion process seems to cut off the cover page each time
    - Emailing and having amazon convert is fast. I like it!
    - You can plug the kindle into the USB, then "eject" it from the OS. This allows you to continue to charge the kindle and read it at the same time. You could also just plug it into an electrical socket and read from it too.
    - If you stop/pause your MP3 music it will start all the way back at track #1. This is not an MP3 player. It also plays the most recently added track first
    - 10 minutes it goes into sleep mode, but if you leave Wi-fi on = drains your battery quicker. Better to turn Wi-fi off when not using it
    - Buy a case to protect it and get yourself a light for times when you don't have enough light to read by. This is not a cell-phone screen, meaning you can't read it in the dark. The screen very much simulates paper in this case.
    - Manual even states...you cannot connect the Wi-fi to a corporate wi-fi. Most companies require VPN of some sort, which is not supported here.
    - Loaded a 25Mb PDF and when when trying to search I get the following error message, ""your search can not be completed as this item has not been indexed. Please try again later." Found forum posts that said give the Kindle at least 10 minutes to complete indexing the file. . .longer if file if big. Sure enough, about 30 minutes later I tried again and was able to search this large PDF.

    8/29/10 update:
    - Just got back from Starbucks
    * Turned wi-fi on
    * Menu > Settings > Wifi Settings and selected the attwifi network option
    * Home > Menu > Experimental > Launch browser
    * zoom in on the terms & agreement checkbox and use the spacebar to check the box
    * click continue button and you are on the internet at the coffee shop!!

    9/3/10 update:
    - A week later, I haven't charged the unit nor shut it down, I've only put it into sleep mode. Battery indicator is still more than 80% full. Nice!
    - Someone pointed me towards "Calibre" a free conversion utility. Totally supports the Kindle 3 and converts to PDF, ePub, Mobi, etc. Works great and you can have the program send the converted document directly to your device via USB or email. The program also acts as your own "backup" by creating a document library on your hard drive that can be sorted, metadata updated, etc. It's very cool!

    9/5/10 update:
    - I kept getting unconverted PDFs (PDFs copied directly to unit via USB vs. sending to email for conversion) would result in the unit restarting when trying to access the PDF. Found forums that said you need to reset the unit. Slide & hold the power button for 15 seconds. Let it take the 20 seconds to reboot. This worked for me.

    9/10/10 update:
    Comments discussion & answers on the following:
    - Annotating PDFs, then accessing these notes for later review on a laptop/desktop
    - Is there an auto-scrolling for PDFs? = No
    - What its like to have the kindle "read" back to you? = robotic voice that ignores punctuation
    - More info on document conversion, including sending emails to the kindle for conversion?
    - The ability to access Gmail from the kindle? = yes, works fine though a bit slow on wi-fi

    9/19/10 update:
    - Check out the comments for my answer to, "Should I buy 3G or is wifi good enough?" = need to buy a book on the run, then get 3G. If you can wait till you get home or a coffee shop, then wi-fi works fine.

    9/24/10 update:
    Comments discussion & answers on the following:
    - Exactly how does an Audible audio book work with the Kindle?
    - Possible causes for why MP3 music is not recognized by the device?

    10/2/10 update:
    Comments discussion & answers on the following:
    - Can you play Audible audio books while at the same time reading along? = for all intents and purposes, no
    - How easy is it to register a new/used K3 to a different owner? = easy as pie

    10/23/10 update:
    Comments discussion & answers on the following:
    - Can you change out the battery yourself? = no
    - Can you share your documents with other kindle users? = legally only if both devices are under the same user account

    12/7/10 update:
    Comments discussion & answers on the following:
    - Can a color document show up as color on the kindle? = No, doc will be converted to greyscale
    - Able to support textbooks? = Yes, if in a supported document type
    - Should I pay the extra $50 for 3G in order to more easily access websites? = Up to you...many sites have mobile versions that load great on wi-fi. NOTE: still doesn't support sites that use Java
    - Will I have 3G coverage in my rural area? = Amazon gives a disclaimer in their FAQ that 3G connection is not guaranteed in some areas
    - Should I get the K3 for my 10 year old? = I personally feel this is a great device for any age reader. . .and gives the parent control/visibility to what is being read

    5-0 out of 5 stars Kindle vs. Nook (updated 12/1/2010)
    If you're trying to choose between a Nook and a Kindle, perhaps I can help. My wife and I have owned a Nook (the original one, not the new Nook Color), a Kindle 2, and a Kindle DX. When Amazon announced the Kindle 3 this summer, we pre-ordered two Kindle 3's: the wi-fi only model in graphite, and the wi-fi + 3G model in white. They arrived in late August and we have used them very regularly since then. For us, Kindle is better than Nook, but Nook is a good device with its own advantages that I will discuss below. I'll end this review with a few words about the Nook Color.

    First, reasons why we prefer the Kindle:

    * Speed

    In our experience, the Kindle is very zippy compared to the Nook. Page refresh speed (the time it takes a new page to appear after you push the page-turn button) was WAY quicker on Kindle 2 than on Nook, and it's quicker yet on Kindle 3. Yet, I read a whole book on the Nook and didn't find the slower page refresh to be annoying - you get used to it, and it's not a problem.

    For me, the more important speed difference concerns navigation - moving the cursor around the screen, for example to pick a book from your library, or to jump to a chapter by selecting it in the table of contents. On Kindle, you do this by pushing a 5-way rocker button, and the cursor moves very quickly. On Nook, you do this by activating the color LCD touchscreen (which normally shuts off when not in use, to conserve battery). A "virtual rocker button" appears on the screen, and you touch it to move the cursor. Unfortunately, the Nook cursor moves very sluggishly. This might not be a big deal to you, but it really got annoying to me, especially since my wife's Kindle was so quick and responsive.

    In November 2010, Nook got a software upgrade that increases page refresh speed and makes navigation more responsive. I returned my Nook months ago, so I cannot tell you if the Nook's performance is now equal to the Kindle's, but Nook owners in the comments section have convinced me that the software update improves the experience of using the Nook. If performance is a big factor in your decision, visit a Best Buy and compare Kindle and Nook side by side.

    * Screen contrast

    You've seen Amazon's claims that the Kindle 3 e-ink has 50% better contrast than Kindle 2 or other e-ink devices. I have no way of precisely measuring the improvement in contrast, but I can tell you that the Kindle 3 display definitely has more contrast than Kindle 2 or Nook. The difference is noticeable, and important: more screen contrast means less eyestrain when reading in poorly lit rooms.

    In well-lit rooms, the Nook and Kindle 2 have enough contrast to allow for comfortable reading. But I often read in low-light conditions, like in bed at night, or in a poorly lit room. In these situations, reading on Nook or Kindle 2 was a bit uncomfortable and often gave me a mild headache. When I got the Kindle 3, the extra contrast was immediately noticeable, and made it more comfortable to read under less-than-ideal lighting conditions. (If you go with a Nook, just make sure you have a good reading lamp nearby.)

    * Battery life

    The Nook's color LCD touch screen drains its battery quickly - I could never get more than 5 days out of a charge. The Kindle 2 had longer battery life than the Nook, and Kindle 3 has even longer life: in the 3 months since we received our Kindle 3's, we typically get 3 weeks of battery life between charges. (We keep wireless off about half the time to save battery power.)

    * Weight

    Nook weighs about 3 ounces more than the new Kindle, and you can really feel the difference. Without a case, Nook is still light enough to hold in one hand for long reading sessions without fatigue. But in a case, Nook is a heavy sucker. The new Kindle 3 is so light, even in a case, we find it comfortable holding in one hand for long reading sessions.

    Reasons some people might prefer the Nook:

    * In-store experience

    If you need help with your nook, you can take it to any barnes and noble and get a real human to help. You can take your nook into the coffee shop section of your local B&N store and read any book for free for up to one hour per day. When you take your nook to B&N, some in-store special deals and the occasional free book pop up on your screen.

    * User-replaceable battery

    Rechargeable batteries eventually lose their ability to hold a charge. Nook's battery is user-replaceable and relatively inexpensive. To replace Kindle's battery, Amazon wants you to ship your Kindle to Amazon, and they will ship you back a DIFFERENT Kindle than the one you sent (it's the same model, for example if you send a white Kindle 3, you get a white Kindle 3 back, but you get a "refurbished" one, NOT the exact one you sent them). I don't like this at all.

    However, several people have posted comments here that have eased my concerns. Someone looked up statistics on the Kindle's battery and did some simple calculations to show that it should last for 3 or more years. Before that happens, I will surely have upgraded to a newer Kindle model by then. Also, someone found some companies that sell Kindle batteries at reasonable cost and have how-to videos that demonstrate how we can replace the battery ourselves. Doing this would void the Kindle's warranty, but the battery will probably not fail until long after the warranty expires.

    * ePub

    Nook uses the ePub format, a widely used open format. Amazon uses a proprietary ebook format. Many libraries will "lend" ebooks in the ePub format, which works with nook but not kindle. However, a free and reputable program called Calibre allows you to translate ebooks from one format to another - it supports many formats, including ePub and Kindle. The only catch is that it doesn't work with copy-protected ebooks, so you can't, for example, buy a Kindle book (which is copy protected) and translate it to ePub so you can read it on a Nook.

    * lending e-books to friends

    Nook owners can "loan" ebooks they purchased to other nook owners for up to two weeks. You can't do this with kindle - yet. Amazon has announced it will soon add this lending feature to all kindles (via a software update that will be available to people who already own kindles).

    * Nook's color LCD touchscreen

    This could be a pro or con, depending on your preferences. It makes nook hipper and less drab than kindle. Some people enjoy using the color LCD to view their library or navigate. I did, at first. But after two weeks of use, and comparisons with my wife's kindle, I found the dedicated buttons of the kindle easier and far quicker to use than the nook's color touchscreen. I also found the bright light from the color screen distracting when I was trying to read a book or newspaper (though when not in use, it shuts off after a minute or so to conserve battery).

    * expandable capacity

    Nook comes with 2GB of internal memory. If you need more capacity, you can insert a microSD card to add up to 16GB more memory. Kindle comes with 4GB of internal memory - twice as much as Nook - but there's no way to expand that. Kindle doesn't accept memory cards of any type. If you mainly use your device to read ebooks and newspapers, this shouldn't be an issue. I have over 100 books on my Kindle, and I've used only a tiny fraction of the memory. Once Kindle's memory fills up, just delete books you don't need immediate access to; you can always restore them later, in seconds, for free.

    A few other notes:

    Kindle and Nook have other features, such as an MP3 player and a web browser, but I caution you to have low expectations for these features. The MP3 player on the Kindle is like the first-generation iPod shuffle - you can't see what song is playing, and you can't navigate to other songs on your device. I don't like the browser on either device; e-ink is just not a good technology for surfing the web; it's slower and clunkier than LCD screen technology, so even the browser on an Android phone or iPod touch is more enjoyable to use. However, some commenters have more favorable views of either device's browser, and you might, too.

    * PDF support

    Kindle and Nook both handle PDF files, but in different ways. When you put a PDF file on your nook, nook converts it into an ebook-like file, then you can adjust the font size, and the text and pagination will adjust just like with any ebook. But you cannot see the original PDF file in the native format in which it was created. Kindle 3 and Kindle DX have native support for PDF files. You can see PDF files just as they would appear on your computer. You can also convert PDF files to an ebook-like format, and then Kindle handles them just the way the Nook handles them - text and pagination adjust when you change the font size. Unfortunately, some symbols, equations, and graphics get lost or mangled in the translation - even when viewing PDF files in their native format on the Kindle. Moreover, the small screen size of the Kindle 3 and the Nook is not great for PDF files, most of which are designed for a larger page size. You can zoom and pan, but this is cumbersome and tiresome. Thanks to commenters who suggested viewing PDF files in landscape mode on the Kindle (I don't know if you can do this on Nook); this way, you can see the entire top half of the page without panning, and then scroll down to the bottom half. This works a little better.

    SUMMARY:

    Nook and Kindle each offer their own advantages. We like the nook's user-replaceable battery, compatibility with ePub format, and in-store experience. But we strongly prefer Kindle 3 because its performance is zippier, its higher-contrast screen is easier to read, and it's smaller and lighter so it is more portable and more comfortable to hold in one hand for long reading sessions.

    * Nook Color

    Everything I wrote about the Nook in this review applies to the original Nook (which continues to be available), not the new Nook Color. To me, the Nook Color is in a different product category than the Kindle or original Nook. Nook Color has an LCD screen, like an iPad or most computer monitors. Reading on a computer screen for long periods of time is not comfortable for me - it causes fatigue and headaches. The e-ink Kindle is very comfortable for long reading sessions. So I'll take a pass on the Nook Color. But it will probably be great for others, especially people who want to watch movies, surf the web and play games on their e-reader, and don't mind the extra cost, weight, or lack of 3G. I've seen and played with a Nook Color at my local B&N, and it is a very attractive device. I'm looking forward to reading user reviews of the Nook Color when people start getting them. If you get one, please post a comment to let us know how you like it.

    3-0 out of 5 stars Worth the money. Not perfect, but very very good for start to finish novels in good light
    The Kindle is my first e-ink reader. I own an iPad, an iPhone, and have owned a Windows-based phone in the past that I used as an ereader.

    My overall impression of the device is good.

    The good:
    I'd honestly rather read linear (read from page one to the end, one page at a time) fiction from it than a book, because I can't always get comfortable with a book. Hardcovers are sometimes a bit heavy, and paperbacks don't always lie open easily. The Kindle is incredibly light and thin. I can hold it in one hand easily. The page turn buttons are conveniently located. Page-turns aren't instant, but they're probably quicker than turning a physical page in a printed book (there are just a lot more page-turns unless you choose a small font). The contrast is better than other ereaders I've seen. There is zero eye strain in good light. My eyesight isn't the greatest and I like being able to increase the font size and read without glasses. I love being able to browse the Kindle store and read samples before deciding to purchase. The "experimental" browser is surprisingly usable, but isn't great. It is useful for browsing wikipedia and blogs. The biggest drawback to the browser is the awkward pointer navigation, using the 5-way pad. It syncs your furthest read page over the internet so you can pick up where you left off using your iPhone or iPad.

    The so-so:
    The kindle store could use more categories and sorting options. You can't sort by "top rated," and there is no category for "alternate histories," for example. Finding a very-specific type of fiction relies on keyword searches, which don't do a great job. The wifi sometimes doesn't connect before it times-out. You rarely need the wifi, but it is annoying if you change a setting, answer "OK" to the prompt to connect, and the thing tells you it failed to connect two seconds later (the exact moment it indicates that it did finally connect, then you need to go back to update the setting again). Most settings don't require a connection, but it is a minor annoyance. Most of your time will be spent reading, and of course your books are stored on the device and a connection is not required. Part of me wishes I'd bought the 3G model, because the browser is good enough that having lifetime free 3G wireless would be worth the extra money. Magazines don't look very good and are not very easy to navigate. There is minor glare in some lighting conditions, mostly when a lamp is positioned behind the reader's head.

    The bad:
    The contrast is fair to poor in dim light. It is much easier to read a printed page in dim light. In good light, contrast is on par with a pulp paperback. In dim light it feels almost like reading from an old Palm Pilot (resolution is better than an old Palm, but contrast is bad in dim light). The screen is small enough that the frequency of page turns is pretty high. Even in good light, the light gray background is less pleasant than the eggshell background of a printed page. You must tell it to sync before you switch it off, if you expect the feature allowing you to pick up where you left off using other devices to work correctly. The copy protection prevents you from using the files on anything other than Kindle software or devices.

    Vs iPad:
    IPad is a lot better for magazines, reference materials, and illustrated materials. Kindle is worlds better for reading novels. IPad is pretty heavy, making it more difficult to hold in your hand or carry with you everywhere. Kindle is much more portable and easier to hold. IPad has some amazing children's books and magazines, which take advantage of its multimedia features. IPad is unreadable in sunlight and glare is bad in bright light. Kindle is as good as a printed page in bright light. Ipad serves as a creative tool, a computing tool, a gaming tool, and a communication tool. Kindle is only a novel machine. I don't regret buying either one of them. An iPad won't replace books, but a Kindle can, if the book is text-only.

    I highly recommend this device at its new low price if you are a frequent reader of novels. I love my kindle. Just don't expect it to be more than it is. Leave the magazines and such to the tablet computers.

    4-0 out of 5 stars I Wanted a Dedicated E-Reader, and That's What I Got
    I'm a first-time Kindle owner, so I have nothing to "compare" the latest Kindle to. I don't own a Nook. I don't own an iPad (and, in any case, that's comparing apples to oranges). I don't have a Sony e-reader. '

    This will be a short, simple review.

    I received my Kindle about a week ago and haven't been able to put it down.

    Things I like about my Kindle?
    1. The e-ink display is amazing.
    2. Using the 5-way controller is simple and effective.
    3. Page turn speeds are faster than I thought they would be.
    4. It's lightweight, even with the attached cover (I have an Amazon cover with a built-in light)
    5. Page-turning buttons are quiet and well-placed.
    6. Recharge time is fast.
    7. I can order a book and start reading it in less than 60 seconds. Nice!
    8. Portability... I can take 3,000 books with me when I travel for work and not require additional suitcases or baggage fees.

    Things I'm not too keen on?
    1. Buttons are too close together and are laid out oddly.
    2. Lack of individual number buttons is frustrating.
    3. Power button on the bottom? Not a bad thing. Just an odd thing. (Same for the headphone input). I usually rest the "bottom" of a book on my lap when I read.

    Things I hope change in the future?
    1. How books are organized... When I put a book in a collection (which is actually a "tag"), it still appears in the main list. It's not actually "moved", it's merely associated.
    2. The look of the main screen. I'd like "folders" or some other way to display "collections".
    3. Ability to create personal "screen savers."
    4. E-book pricing, though Amazon has little control over this. Still, most titles are the same price as or less than their hardback/paperback counterparts. (And I'm not opposed to paying more for convenience and portability).

    Things that don't bother me regarding other reviews?
    1. The browser is experimental. Amazon has created a dedicated e-reader, and it's meant to be used to read. Period. Not browse the web. If you want to browse the web, get a computer -- not an e-reader.
    2. The Kindle is not an mP3 player, either. Yes, it's nice to have some classical music playing in the background while I read, but I don't need to see the title of the song, album art, etc. (And you can skip from track to track on the Kindle using shortcut keys).
    3. Lack of a "color" or "touch" screen.

    In summary, for $139, I'm quite thrilled with my purchase and have arleady read multiple books on it. In fact, I think I've read more in the past week than I've read in the past month.

    5-0 out of 5 stars Not the perfect "do-it-all" device, but very close to being the perfect e-reading device!
    I woke up to a nice surprise this morning: a new kindle as a gift. I have an iPad and a Kindle DX, but I guess someone heard my complaints of them being too heavy and difficult to do extended-reading on. Don't get me wrong, I absolutely love my iPad and DX, but this new generation of Kindle is perfect for reading outside and for long periods of time. The iPad gets completely washed out in sunlight and often irritates my eyes staring at it for more than a couple of hours. The DX was my go-to device for those extended/outdoor reading periods, but now I have a new friend for reading novels. Instead of a replacement, this one seems more like a companion to the other devices and is a different class. The iPad works great for web browsing, shopping, productivity, games, etc while the Kindle falls short in those areas. The Kindle works great for reading novels, where the iPad falls short. For those that love to do extended-reading of magazines, newspapers, research articles, etc, I find that the DX is the go-to device.

    Without a doubt, the size and weight of the new kindle is the biggest draw for me. It's smaller than the last edition by a significant margin. I've played around with the Kindle 2 and was impressed, but now looking at the size of the new Kindle, I'm blown away. It's the absolute perfect size. Smaller would be unmanageable and larger wouldn't feel nearly as good. This is a device that you can hold up, read, and just forget that it's there. Compared to other e-readers I've tried, it's much smaller and much lighter.

    One of my biggest complaints about the previous generation Kindles and the DX is the speed. It sometimes takes a while after you push `next page' for it to actually change. In addition, the web browsing feature was so slow and clunky that it is really unusable in my opinion. Two additions to the new Kindle have helped attenuate these issues. First, the pages do flip quicker (albeit, still slow in my opinion), and the addition of wifi has allowed faster connection for wireless activities (much better than only relying on 3G). I still can't see myself using the Kindle as an internet browsing tool or really doing much online aside from purchasing reading material, but the faster connection at least opens up the possibility - something that would only frustrate me on previous editions.

    The new Kindle also offers a better contrast than previous editions and it looks fantastic compared to every other e-reader I have seen. I have no trouble seeing the screen in dim light or in bright sunlight - it really opens up the ability to read almost anywhere you are. Of course, you'll still need a separate light for extremely dark areas.

    Another big addition to the Kindle 3 is that it offers double the storage compared to Kindle 2. I've never had a problem with the amount of storage since I can't possibly see myself filling up that much space (I don't put mp3's on it), but perhaps in the future, if certain applications or media files are put on the kindle, it could have been a problem. The additional space in the new model is definitely a welcome addition, but bringing back the memory card slot that was included on Kindle 1 would have been an even more welcome addition in my opinion.

    Among e-readers, I definitely recommend the Kindle 3 if not just because it has a better size/form-factor, contrast, battery life, and speed compared to every other e-reader I have tried. On top of that, you get the wonderful amazon buying experience and selection for all your literature and can keep your kindle library intact between whatever other device you want to download a Kindle application onto.

    The question of whether you need a Kindle vs another type of device for reading becomes a little more tricky and really comes down to what you want to use it for.

    Do you want a device to read novels on, perhaps read outside, and have something very light that you almost forget it's there? Buy the Kindle.

    Do you want something to lie in bed with for short periods of time while surfing the web? I might suggest going with the iPad, a different tablet, or a netbook.

    Do you already have a Kindle 1 or 2? That's a tough one.... I don't think the new edition has enough `new' to it to warrant the upgrade in my mind, but some might value the new size and wifi capabilities even more-so than I do. For me, the new Kindle was a welcome addition to my family of devices since I didn't have anything anywhere near its form factor and convenience.

    Should you get 3G + Wifi or just Wifi? I think this question can be answered simply by asking yourself if you travel a lot. Being able to buy books and access wireless content on the road is an indispensable option and well worth the extra money in my mind. Keeping the device mainly at home or near wifi hotspots really negates the need for 3G though.

    Overall, I have to give the Kindle a 5 star rating because it does what it was designed to do very well, and in my opinion better than any of the competition. While the new features and capabilities aren't game-changing and truly outstanding, it is smaller, more capable, and better than any other e-reader out there. If you want `one device to handle it all', this isn't the place to look, but If you want a fantastic device solely for reading books, this is what you want.

    5-0 out of 5 stars A hesistant buyer rejoices on his choice
    I researched the purchase of a Kindle for a long time. I couldn't decide whether or not it was worth buying a dedicated e-reader. Boy am I glad I made this purchase. The downside to Amazon's online selling of Kindle 3 is that the customers don't get to see it in person. It is much better in person. This may sound stupid, but when I got my new Kindle, I thought there was a stuck-on overlay on the screen containing a diagram of the unit's buttons, etc. I actually tried to peel it off. Doh! The e-ink on this unit is THAT good. I didn't realize that I was staring at the actual display. I also didn't realize that no power is required until the display changes. (thus the great battery life) I do a lot of reading, but was facing the prospect of reading less or buying large type books because of my variable and deteriorating eyesight. The new Kindle has been a godsend. Now, I can decide the size of type I need depending on my level of fatigue among other things. The weight and ergonomics are very good. For someone, like me, with neuropathy in his hands, it is extremely easy to manage and enjoyable to own. To me, it is easier to read than print books. The ease of navigation is great as is the speed. The battery life, so far, has been extraordinary. It easily connected to our home Wi-Fi, which by design does not broadcast an SSID. It downloads books so fast that I almost thought they were not completely received. I did not buy the 3G version because of the price difference and the fact that there is no coverage where I live. If you are not constantly traveling, I don't see the need to spend the extra bucks, but that is a matter of personal choice. For those who have no Wi-Fi at home, remember that you can always download the material to your computer and transfer it via USB. Just today I was watching an interview with Tony Blair on TV. He was talking about his new book, which sounded interesting. I picked up the Kindle and downloaded a free sample before the interview was over. I have only read the preface so far, but will probably buy the book. Now THAT is a great way to buy a book! I haven't used online browsing extensively yet, but find it reasonable for what the device is. This is primarily a book reader, not a laptop or notebook. They are great for what they do, but can't match the e-ink display, or the light weight. For those of you worrying about the wait for the new Kindle, let me end with, "It is worth the wait" This new Kindle is all about the quality of experience. There are many format choices for electronic reading. If you want the best experience, go with the Kindle.

    5-0 out of 5 stars Solid Improvements! Check out my video review!
    I just received my new Kindle, and my early impressions are very positive - it's definitely a solid step up from the previous generation Kindle. Check out my video review to see/hear more!

    UPDATE 9/7/2010: Hey guys - based on the comments received there are definitely some questions that people are interested in that I didn't touch on in my video review - so I wanted to take some time to answer some of those questions here. Hopefully this is helpful!

    Q: Is the Kindle 3 backlit? If not, then how do you see it at night?

    A: The Kindle 3 is not backlit. For the Kindle 2 I used a leather case with a reading light clipped to it. For the Kindle 3 Amazon produced a leather case that has a built-in reading light. I've been using it since day 1 and I love it. I made a video review for that also if you want to check it out:

    http://www.amazon.com/review/R27V1SXQSI9M86/

    Q: How well does the new joystick control work?

    A: The new Kindle replaces the old five-way navigation joystick with a center button surrounded by a thin 4-way directional control. After messing around with both of these approaches, I don't really have a strong personal preference one way or another - they both work fine for me.

    If you have big hands then I can definitely see having a bit of trouble getting used to the new joystick. The directional control is very thin, and if you're going to have trouble with any button on the Kindle... that's definitely going to be the one.

    Q: How is viewing PDFs on the Kindle 3? Are they easy to upload onto the Kindle?

    A: Uploading PDFs to the Kindle is very easy. You just connect your Kindle to your computer via USB cable and then drag and drop the PDFs. Totally simple. Viewing them is pretty decent, but the major problem is that most PDFs aren't designed for a 6 inch screen. You might have to do a lot of zooming and panning to see the content you want. If you plan on viewing a ton of PDFs, then you may want to check out the Kindle DX Wireless Reading Device, Free 3G, 9.7" Display, Graphite, 3G Works Globally  Latest Generation.

    Q: How well does the text-to-speech work?

    A: It's ok. You definitely won't mistake it for a professionally produced audiobook, but it doesn't sound as bad as you may think it will. Also note that text-to-speech is not available for every book. You can see on the product page for each Kindle book if text-to-speech is enabled or not.

    5-0 out of 5 stars K3 is perfect
    When I first unboxed the new K3, I was slightly disappointed. The new 5-way appeared to be harder to used than the little joystick of the K2. I have to say, though, two days later, I'm liking it much better. Since I'm getting used to it so quickly, I think in another day I won't know the difference.

    The size is absolutely perfect. In the Amazon cover, it is exactly like reading from a paperback book. It's noticeably lighter and easier to hold for reading, even with arthritis in my hands. The page turn buttons are wonderful. Almost no noise, and you don't have to push them as hard. It should make it much easier for those with weak or disabled hands. I also like have next page and previous buttons on both sides. I didn't think it would make a difference to me, but it really does.

    I tried a couple of times to connect the WiFi, but didn't get it to work. Today I had more time so I thought I'd try to puzzle through it. But when I navigated to the wireless menu, it had somehow figured out how to connect on its own. The browser is MUCH faster, and it made buying a book a breeze.

    I haven't had it long enough to comment on the extended battery life. But I was honestly fine with the more than 10 days I always got with K2.

    And the FONTS! My word what a difference! I can practically read in the dark! I've been able to reduce the font size from 4 to 2. Combine sharper contrast with better fonts and it's an unbeatable combo.

    The ONLY thing I would change if I could is to move the Menu button, and especially the Back button. I'm having a little trouble navigating with the down arrow because I hit Back. But I'm starting to get the hang of it.

    All in all, I think Amazon hit it out of the park with the K3!

    5-0 out of 5 stars K3 Even Better than its Predecessor
    It's no longer necessary to write about how desirable the Kindle is (or, for that matter, e-readers generally). Books and text and reading are with us to stay; only paper is becoming unnecessary. What we can discuss is how well a device performs its intended task(s), and how it compares to its competition on an absolute basis and for the price.

    My wife and I share a last gen 6" Kindle and just received a new 6" display K3. I know, Amazon doesn't call it that, but how else can users refer to it? In twenty words or less, it is an improvement over an already excellent product. Smaller, but not too small to be held comfortably. Same size display, but sharper and crisper, better contrast. Easy to use, somewhat smaller keyboard that takes a little, but very little, getting used to. It took me a few hours to stop accidentally pressing some neighboring keys, but now using the keyboard is second nature. And the page turning buttons are silent, but have sufficient tactile feedback, excellent feel.

    I found it very easy to duplicate our library from our older Kindle to our new K3, and to activate our home wifi. I don't like to say I "transferred" our books because that could be understood to mean they were taken from our old Kindle to our new one. I say "duplicate" because they reside on both Kindles. The instruction manual is detailed and somewhat lengthy, but very understandable. (It's 200 pages, but don't let that scare you; it's easy to find the parts you need, and you will never need more than a few pages at one time.) The manual is published on the device, as in the past, and can also be downloaded to your computer as a pdf file so you can read the instructions from your computer as you apply them to the K3.

    If you have wifi at home, which we do, when you are in range of a wifi that you have activated in your K3, it automatically uses that wifi, instead of connecting to the 3G AT&T network, assuming, of course, you have a 3G+wifi K3. It works faster on my home wifi than on the 3G network, so much so that if I had really thought it through before I bought it, or if I were to buy another, I would probably go wifi only and save $50. The only reasons to get the 3G+wifi model would seem to be if you don't have reliable access to wifi or if you travel a good deal to places that don't have a lot of wifi access, but do have AT&T connectivity AND you have need to download books or periodicals on a regular basis or without delay while you are away from home or office. If you can plan ahead and stock up on a few good books, and you have reliable access to wifi, such as at home/office, McDonalds or Starbucks, I suggest you think twice about whether you want the 3G+wifi K3, or the wifi only.

    Each K3 has its own email address and you can send documents to it, including Word and pdf docs, and photos. Of course, the photos are B&W, but very detailed and clear. The K3 permits surfing the web, although I haven't used it much for that purpose and, other than saying it works, I hesitate to pass judgment on how well I think someone who uses it for web browsing would like it.

    I can't compare it to other dedicated e-readers because I haven't used them. People seem to be interested in how I think it compares to the iPad, which I don't own but have "played with" somewhat extensively at the Apple Store. My assessment is that there is no comparison. The iPad will do much more, but as an e-reader I think the K3 is superior. I don't need color for reading text, the K3 is a fraction of the cost, and its smaller size makes it much more convenient to tote around. However, what kills the iPad as an e-reader, as far as I am concerned, is its weight. I suspect most of us are the same in this regard, but I tend to read for an hour or two at a stretch. A pound and a half doesn't sound too heavy, but I held an iPad for five minutes, literally, and my hands ached. It is simply too heavy to use as a book reading device, while the K3 is light as a feather. For reading, a cheaper and significantly lighter K3 as a dedicated e-reader is, IMHO, the way to go (compared to an iPad). BTW, a recent (in Aug. 2010) report from Taiwan said Apple in making a 6" iPod, which, depending on size and weight, could change the equation. It will be interesting to see how the e-reader market develops. I said I can't compare the K3 to other competitors, and I won't, but I can say I am completely satisfied with Amazon as an e-book seller. I've only had a few occasions to need support (on my old Kindle), but that has also been entirely satisfactory.

    Bottom line: my wife and I both like the K3 very much and recommend it to anyone considering buying an e-reader. I don't think you will regret buying one, with or without the free 3G.

    1-0 out of 5 stars Quality control problems
    First, the good stuff. Kindle 3 has a very readable high contrast screen. The form factor is small and light enough to be a book replacement. Purchasing and downloading content is simple and convenient.

    However, I had a series of problems which eventually led me to return my Kindle.

    After unpacking and charging my Kindle 3, it refused to connect to my wireless network. I have a variety of other devices ranging from a Nintendo Wii to an iPod Touch and two computers that work just fine on my wireless network, but the Kindle couldn't connect after many attempts. I eventually gave up and turned it off. When I turned it back on several hours later, it had mysteriously connected to my WiFi network with the exact same settings that did not work earlier. I have noticed that several other users have ran into the same problem.

    The next problem I noticed was that something was rolling around inside the casing. This is obviously not a good sign. Then, my Kindle 3 started freezing. The first freeze happened while using the experimental browser. As this is an "experimental" application, I wasn't too concerned. After a power reset, the Kindle came back up. The second freeze happened while playing Shuffled Row, which is a good game. After this freeze, my Kindle refused to reboot after many power reset attempts. (Yes, I did try keeping the power switch in the "turn-on" position for up to 30 seconds as suggested by the manual.) I eventually gave up and put it down. However, after a few minutes, the Kindle started to reboot itself. The was another freeze while reading a book, which was fixed with a power reset. I tried to contact Amazon for service, but it looks like the only way to get Kindle customer service is through a phone call.

    And then my Kindle froze again while reading a book. This time, nothing would reset the kindle. When this last freeze happened, the battery was charged about 75%. At this point, there was no option but to return the kindle. There are some comments among the negative reviews here that the usual Amazon.com return process does not work. In my case, I was able to follow the regular Amazon return process and print a return label. So my Kindle is back to Amazon after less than a week of use.

    Judging from other reviews that had similar experiences as mine, Amazon appears to have a specific quality control problem with this latest version of the Kindle. People may be more tolerant of the reliability other electronic gadgets, however, it is unacceptable for a product that is primarily intended to replace paper books to have issues like freezing and/or rebooting. After all, I never had a "paper" book freeze or reboot on me so far. Receiving a product with defects that should have been caught during testing before shipping pretty much destroys the "Kindle experience".

    UPDATE (October 31, 2010): Since I do like the Kindle concept, after reading about the improvement in stability with the latest software upgrades, I purchased another Kindle WiFi. Everything was great for almost two weeks, no crashes. However, yesterday, the second Kindle also ended up with a frozen screen. After following through the instructions on Amazon's Kindle troubleshooting page and talking to the customer service, there was no way to get the Kindle out of the frozen state, so this one is also going back. The fact that this situation can happen to the same customer twice in a matter of few months indicates either a serious quality control problem or component reliability problem.

    5-0 out of 5 stars Details on working with PDF, Wi-fi vs 3G, Starbucks, Audio books, MP3 and other things
    NOTE: Amazon limits the video size and duration, so I targeted what I thought were some key points.
    I check comments, so leave one if you have any questions not covered in the video or below and I'll try and answer.

    First off I love this device!!
    Like ipods are the king of MP3 players, this is the king of ebook readers in my opinion.

    I've been looking at this thing for at least 7+ hrs today and my eyes don't feel tired at all.

    If you want. . .
    * a low cost eBook reader
    * that allows you to read books
    * looks great
    * easy to setup
    * easy to hold/carry
    * easy on the eyes (no getting tired eyes from a glaring screen)
    . . . then look no further than this product!



    **Adding updates as I find other feature behaviors**

    - The comic I converted to PDF when emailed to my kindle email address the conversion process didn't like it too much. Better to not use the conversion process for those types of PDFs. Other PDF's converted just fine.
    - Emailing PDF = the conversion process seems to cut off the cover page each time
    - Emailing and having amazon convert is fast. I like it!
    - You can plug the kindle into the USB, then "eject" it from the OS. This allows you to continue to charge the kindle and read it at the same time. You could also just plug it into an electrical socket and read from it too.
    - If you stop/pause your MP3 music it will start all the way back at track #1. This is not an MP3 player. It also plays the most recently added track first
    - 10 minutes it goes into sleep mode, but if you leave Wi-fi on = drains your battery quicker. Better to turn Wi-fi off when not using it
    - Buy a case to protect it and get yourself a light for times when you don't have enough light to read by. This is not a cell-phone screen, meaning you can't read it in the dark. The screen very much simulates paper in this case.
    - Manual even states...you cannot connect the Wi-fi to a corporate wi-fi. Most companies require VPN of some sort, which is not supported here.
    - Loaded a 25Mb PDF and when when trying to search I get the following error message, ""your search can not be completed as this item has not been indexed. Please try again later." Found forum posts that said give the Kindle at least 10 minutes to complete indexing the file. . .longer if file if big. Sure enough, about 30 minutes later I tried again and was able to search this large PDF.

    8/29/10 update:
    - Just got back from Starbucks
    * Turned wi-fi on
    * Menu > Settings > Wifi Settings and selected the attwifi network option
    * Home > Menu > Experimental > Launch browser
    * zoom in on the terms & agreement checkbox and use the spacebar to check the box
    * click continue button and you are on the internet at the coffee shop!!

    9/3/10 update:
    - A week later, I haven't charged the unit nor shut it down, I've only put it into sleep mode. Battery indicator is still more than 80% full. Nice!
    - Someone pointed me towards "Calibre" a free conversion utility. Totally supports the Kindle 3 and converts to PDF, ePub, Mobi, etc. Works great and you can have the program send the converted document directly to your device via USB or email. The program also acts as your own "backup" by creating a document library on your hard drive that can be sorted, metadata updated, etc. It's very cool!

    9/5/10 update:
    - I kept getting unconverted PDFs (PDFs copied directly to unit via USB vs. sending to email for conversion) would result in the unit restarting when trying to access the PDF. Found forums that said you need to reset the unit. Slide & hold the power button for 15 seconds. Let it take the 20 seconds to reboot. This worked for me.

    9/10/10 update:
    Comments discussion & answers on the following:
    - Annotating PDFs, then accessing these notes for later review on a laptop/desktop
    - Is there an auto-scrolling for PDFs? = No
    - What its like to have the kindle "read" back to you? = robotic voice that ignores punctuation
    - More info on document conversion, including sending emails to the kindle for conversion?
    - The ability to access Gmail from the kindle? = yes, works fine though a bit slow on wi-fi

    9/19/10 update:
    - Check out the comments for my answer to, "Should I buy 3G or is wifi good enough?" = need to buy a book on the run, then get 3G. If you can wait till you get home or a coffee shop, then wi-fi works fine.

    9/24/10 update:
    Comments discussion & answers on the following:
    - Exactly how does an Audible audio book work with the Kindle?
    - Possible causes for why MP3 music is not recognized by the device?

    10/2/10 update:
    Comments discussion & answers on the following:
    - Can you play Audible audio books while at the same time reading along? = for all intents and purposes, no
    - How easy is it to register a new/used K3 to a different owner? = easy as pie

    10/23/10 update:
    Comments discussion & answers on the following:
    - Can you change out the battery yourself? = no
    - Can you share your documents with other kindle users? = legally only if both devices are under the same user account

    12/7/10 update:
    Comments discussion & answers on the following:
    - Can a color document show up as color on the kindle? = No, doc will be converted to greyscale
    - Able to support textbooks? = Yes, if in a supported document type
    - Should I pay the extra $50 for 3G in order to more easily access websites? = Up to you...many sites have mobile versions that load great on wi-fi. NOTE: still doesn't support sites that use Java
    - Will I have 3G coverage in my rural area? = Amazon gives a disclaimer in their FAQ that 3G connection is not guaranteed in some areas
    - Should I get the K3 for my 10 year old? = I personally feel this is a great device for any age reader. . .and gives the parent control/visibility to what is being read
    Read more


    4. Scotch Thermal Laminator 15.5 Inches x 6.75 Inches x 3.75 Inches, 2 Roller System (TL901)
    Office Product
    list price: $80.49 -- our price: $19.99
    (price subject to change: see help)
    Asin: B0010JEJPC
    Manufacturer: 3M Office Products
    Sales Rank: 1
    Average Customer Review: 4.7 out of 5 stars
    US | Canada | United Kingdom | Germany | France | Japan

    Editorial Review

    Scotch(TM) Thermal Laminator TL901 will laminate items up to 9 inches wide. It features a two roller system that has two temperature settings. It can be used for photographs, documents, recipes and much more.This laminator will laminate items up to 5mil thick, including popular 3mil and 5mil pouches. Businesses and families can always find a use for a laminator that is built with 3M quality and durable, intelligent construction. The Scotch(TM) TL901 laminating system laminates letter-size, legal-size, business-card size, photo-size and other papers up to 9 inches wide, your photographs and important documents along with dozens of other projects and crafts. Practical and fun, you can set it up anywhere and anytime. Protect your licenses, make luggage tags, preserve invitations, and create reusable menus, bookmarks, and gifts--you're limited only by your imagination. Plus, the Scotch(TM) TL901 laminating system is portable and lightweight (only 5.4 pounds), taking up just 9 inches of your valuable desk surface. Includes a jam release lever. What's in the Box: Laminator, two 11" x 9.4" double-sided lamination pouches, instructions, warranty information. ... Read more

    Reviews

    5-0 out of 5 stars Great home laminator, April 1, 2009
    I purchased this laminating machine in a store, but wanted to give a definite positive review! I have had this machine running since I got it, and just love it! It's simple to use, works wonderfully and doesnt' take up a ton of space. I have a special needs toddler, who uses picture cards to communicate her needs, and this has made over 100 PECS cards for her book, and now she's even taking them to Pre-k to use them as well! Wonderful machine that is making my little one's life so much better! I am also having tons of fun using it for my small business for price lists and advertising! Great little machine!

    4-0 out of 5 stars Good Laminator, September 19, 2008
    Good all-purpose laminator for the price. Needed to run through a couple of times for thicker sheets. But I am happy with the product. I laminated 75 schedule cards in a row without a breakdown. A good deal.

    5-0 out of 5 stars Excellent customer service - great product, June 21, 2010
    This is a great little laminator, and I've used it even more than expected. But during a momentary lapse of reason, I tried to use a partial pouch - one that was not sealed on the bottom. They tell you not to do it, but I did anyway. Everything disappeared into the machine, and didn't come back out. It didn't look like I could open it up without destroying it, so I called their 800 number. They were so nice, and they sent me a mailing label to ship it back for free. They said that if they could fix it, they would do so and send it back. If they couldn't, they would send me a new one. All free of charge - which is incredible since it was my own fault for doing what they said not to do. I just got a new one in the mail. I only paid $30 for this, yet they replaced it free of charge when I messed it up. You just can't do any better than that!

    5-0 out of 5 stars Good little home machine!, December 31, 2008
    I've been using a small card size thermal laminator to make cards, bookmarks and jewelry with for a few years now. A friend of mine gave me this one for my birthday as an upgrade.
    I love it. It takes about 10 minutes to be ready and has an indicator light to show it's hot enough. A double roller system sends your document through the laminator smoothly at the right speed.
    It's built for 3mm and 5mm lamination pouches which is fine for home and home office use.
    If you do get a jam, the unit has a release button to pull out the document and unjam the machine.
    It's very simple to use, intuitive but it also is illustrated with how to feed your document in as well. You put whatever your laminating into a sleeve then put it into the paper feed in the back of the machine.
    There are 2 heat settings. One for 3mm and one for 5. It handles US Letter sized items easily.
    Possible craft uses:
    I use mine for jewelry, cutting out small images and sealing them into small pouches for less waste. After lamination, cut around the image leaving a margin of the clear laminate, use a small punch to make a hole and attach to jump ring
    bookmarks- pressed flowers make wonderful mementos of special days out
    recipe cards
    dry erase boards
    use in duct tape crafts with nice images. A couple comic book pages laminated can be taped together to make a very unique purse.
    It's a good home laminator for home office and craft use.
    Because of the 10 minute warm up time, I recommend having a few projects ready to go at a time so you can just do them all at once after the unit is heated.

    5-0 out of 5 stars Works just as expected, December 4, 2008
    This is a great laminator, works well for my use, which is occasional. I think I've used this about 3 times a week since I purchased it, and it works just as I expected it.

    5-0 out of 5 stars Excellent Buy!, August 4, 2010
    I snagged this bad boy on a Lightning Deal for 20 bucks this weekend. It arrived yesterday (thank you Amazon Prime!). As soon as I got it, I set it up and used it a few times and I must say, I'm very, very impressed. This is easily worth the full price, so even more excited I got it for 20 bucks. Setup took less than a minute ... just take it out of the box and snap the feeder tray into place. That's it! Heating up took appx 5 minutes. I fed a couple items through and it is absolutely silent. I mean NO noise whatsoever when it's laminating. It autofeeds the item through and takes less than 30 seconds to spit it out the other side. The laminating looked very professional. I could not be happier with this purchase. Highly recommend!

    5-0 out of 5 stars LOVE IT!, March 24, 2009
    I did not buy this from this seller. However, I love this laminator. Most are far more costly than this one. This one is great for personal use. I laminate pictures, my daughter's art projects, etc. It does take about 3 minutes to be "ready" but for the price that is fine with me.

    5-0 out of 5 stars very good and fun, easy to use and operate, recommended, November 7, 2008
    I use it to laminate my kids art works and all those certificates, it is very to use and operate and it's fun too.

    4-0 out of 5 stars Very good little laminator, October 8, 2009
    I needed a laminator to make some ID cards for a club. After looking at a few models here and reading comments, this one looked like a good pick. So far, so good. I have only used it a couple of weeks for about 25 cards, in conjuction with the Fellowes 7 mil business card pouches. This model has a switch for 3 or 5 mil, so of course I used the 5 mil setting and it's working fine. It takes a minute or two to warm up fully, and then the cards run through in just a few seconds. I did have to prop it up a bit to give a little "gravity assist" so that the cards would drop out. I haven't run anything bigger throught it either, so can't speak to that. But for small projects this looks like a very handy device that works well. Read more


    5. Kindle DX Wireless Reading Device, Free 3G, 3G Works Globally, Graphite, 9.7" Display with New E Ink Pearl Technology
    Electronics
    list price: $379.00 -- our price: $379.00
    (price subject to change: see help)
    Asin: B002GYWHSQ
    Manufacturer: Amazon.com
    Sales Rank: 10
    Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars
    US | Canada | United Kingdom | Germany | France | Japan

    Editorial Review

    Say Hello to the Newest Kindle DXAll New, High Contrast E-Ink Screen: Our graphite Kindle DX uses our all new, improved electronic ink display, with 50% better contrast for the clearest text and sharpest imagesBeautiful Large Display: The 9.7" diagonal E-ink screen is ideal for a broad range of reading material, including graphic-rich books, PDFs, newspapers, magazines, and blogs Read in Sunlight with No Glare: Unlike backlit computer or LCD screens, Kindle DX's display looks and reads like real paper, with no glare. Read as easily in bright sunlight as in your living roomSlim: Just over 1/3 of an inch, as thin as most magazinesBooks In Under 60 Seconds: Get books delivered wirelessly in less than 60 seconds; no PC requiredFree 3G Wireless: 3G wireless lets you download books right from your Kindle DX; no monthly fees, no annual contracts.Enjoy 3G wireless coverage at home or abroad in over 100 countries.Long Battery Life: Read for up to 1 week on a single charge with wireless on. Turn wireless off and read for up to two weeks.Carry Your Library: Holds up to 3,500 books, periodicals, and documentsBuilt-In PDF Reader: Carry and read all of your personal and professional documents on the go. Now with Zoom capability to easily view small print and detailed tables or graphicsAuto-Rotating Screen: Display auto-rotates from portrait to landscape as you turn the device so you can view full-width maps, graphs, tables, and Web pagesLarge Selection: Over 600,000 books and the largest selection of the most popular books people want to read plus U.S. and international newspapers, magazines, and blogs.Over 1.8 million free, out-of-copyright, pre-1923 books are available to read on Kindle.For non-U.S. customers, content availability and pricing will vary. Low Book Prices and Free Book Samples: New York Times Best Sellers and New Releases from $9.99. Download and read first chapters for free before you decide to buy ... Read more

    Reviews

    5-0 out of 5 stars Different and Better, June 11, 2009
    I have owned both Kindle 1 and Kindle 2, so I'm already committed to the basic idea: e-ink reading in a slim form factor with excellent connectivity to a large selection of books and subscriptions. I have come to rely on my Kindle experience, and it has seriously enhanced my reading.

    The DX was not an obvious upgrade for me, but two features put me over the edge: the larger screen, and the native PDF reader. I now have the DX in my hands, and can report PROS, CONS, and NEUTRALS:

    PROS:

    -- the larger screen is a definite plus. I use the larger type size on my Kindle 2 (older eyes), and at this type size I get far more text per page on the DX. This makes the whole reading experience more book-like (and should be a boon to people who buy large-print books.)

    -- the screen is also sharper and crisper than my Kindle 2 in a side-by-side comparison: the text is darker, and the contrast is much better, making for better visibility overall.

    -- on a side note, the larger screen also makes it possible to read poetry on the kindle, even at large type sizes. On earlier Kindles, the smaller screen cut off lines, so that you would lose the sense of when the poet ended the line. On the DX, you can see the whole line exactly as the poet meant it, with the cut-off in the right spot.

    -- the PDF reader works as advertised, and is extremely convenient. PDF documents appear on the DX exactly as they do on a computer screen. Moreover, you can drag and drop your documents directly to the device using the USB cable (or use the for-a-fee email if you absolutely must.) The only downside: at least for the documents that I've used so far, I cannot adjust the type size as I can with native Kindle documents.

    -- screen rotation also works as advertised: it operates as a mild zoom on both graphics and text and offsets slightly the downside of not being able to adjust the typesize on PDF documents. One nice design touch: the four-way navigation stick introduced on the Kindle 2 is rotation-sensitive, and will move as expected relative to the screen rotation.

    -- more of the device space is devoted to the screen, while the white plastic border around the screen seems to have shrunk, both in general and compared to the proportion of screen to plastic on the Kindle 2. I like this (but see below about the keyboard).

    -- storage: I like the increase in storage space, and don't mind the lack of an external storage card. I can see some people having trouble with this, but only those folks who either a) must regularly carry around PDF documents totalling more than 3.5 GB of space or b) must have nearly 3500 books regularly at their fingertips. I fall in neither category.

    CONS:

    -- price: it's expensive, as you can tell pretty quickly. If you value the larger size, and the native PDF reader, these features may justify the roughly 30% premium you pay for the DX over the Kindle 2. In truth, the DX SHOULD cost more than the Kindle 2, and a 30% premium isn't unreasonable. But, for my money, Amazon should drop the price on the Kindle 2 to $300 or so, and charge $400 or a little less for the DX. Still, I bought it, and will keep it at this price.

    -- one-sided navigation buttons: all of the buttons are now on the right side, and none are on the left. I'm a righty, so I shouldn't complain, but I found myself using both sides on the Kindle 2. Lefties have reason to complain, I think.

    -- One-handed handling: I often read while I walk, with my Kindle in one hand, and something else in my other. Because of the button layout, this will be more difficult on the DX.

    -- metal backing: I miss the tacky rubberized backing on my Kindle 1. When I placed my Kindle 1 on an inclined surface, it stayed in place. Not so my Kindle 2 and now my DX. This is not a complaint specific to the DX, but it's still there.

    NEUTRALS (i.e. things worth noting):

    -- weight: the DX is heavier, noticeably so. This is only an issue if, like me, you regularly use the kindle with one hand . . . and even so, it's still doable.

    -- keyboard: the keyboard has 4 rows, and not 5: the top row of numbers from the Kindle 1 and 2 has been merged into the top qwerty row, so that numbers are now only accessible with an alt-key combination. The keys are vertically thinner too, so that the whole keyboard is no more than 1" tall (compared to over an 1.5" on the Kindle 2). At the same time, the keys themselves are a bit easier to press, a bit more protruding than on the Kindle 2. For someone with big fingers (like me), this will be a slightly harder keyboard to use, but only slightly.

    That's all I can see. Overall, the pluses outweigh the minuses for me, and I'm satisfied with my purchase. I can now think of using my DX for work documents on a regular basis, because of the PDF reader. The screen size and screen rotation make the overall reading experience more immersive.

    Overall, the DX feels more like text and less like device and comes closer to the stated goal of the Kindle: for the device to disappear, leaving only the joy of reading.







    3-0 out of 5 stars DX not quite all that--but has been improved a bit, June 13, 2009
    This review was written back when the DX first came out and--as has been brought to my attention--needs to be updated a bit. I will indicate where things have changed for the better within the body of the review:

    I owned the K1 and then the K2 and love them both, so I was really looking forward to the DX. My plan was to use the DX at home, and keep my K2 for carrying all over creation with me. It wasn't long, though, after my DX arrived the day before yesterday before disappointment set in.

    Don't get me wrong, there is a LOT to like about the DX:

    1) Pictures are awesome on it, if the publisher formats them properly.

    2) Those who complain about darkness of text on their K2 (a problem I've never had, btw) will be thrilled by the DX's very dark text.

    EDIT: LIKE THE KINDLE 3, THE DX NOW SPORTS A NEW E-INK DISPLAY THAT HAS MUCH BETTER CONTRAST, SO TEXT & PICTURES REALLY "POP."


    3) The ability to rotate the screen is great. Gives you a closer look at things like maps and charts.

    4) The browser is a bit faster than on the K1 or K2, though that isn't saying much--it is still very clunky to use.

    EDIT: THOUGH STILL CLUNKY, THE BROWSER *HAS* BEEN IMPROVED FOR EASIER USE. BUT STILL DON'T PLAN TO DO A LOT OF WEB SURFING WITH IT.


    5) But web pages look pretty good on the DX.

    6) It holds 3500 books.


    BUT.....the DX just isn't all that. It has drawbacks that are really making me consider sending it back before my 30 days are up:

    1) First and foremost, while it is true that it natively reads PDFs, it is really only a PDF *viewer*. You can't change the font size on PDFs, links will not function on them, and the ability to magnify pictures doesn't work on them either. So you better have LARGE fonts on your PDF before you load it. Looking at the PDF in horizontal mode helps a bit, but not by much.

    EDIT: WE NOW HAVE THE ABILITY TO ZOOM IN ON PDF DOCUMENTS, WHICH HELPS IN READING THEM--BUT IT WOULD STILL BEHOOVE USERS TO USE LARGER FONT SIZES IN DOCUMENTS BEFORE CONVERTING TO PDF FORMAT.



    2) The DX is too big to hold comfortably. It's not really all that heavy, but it is top heavy and you feel a pull on your hands. And that pull is really evident if you try to use the keyboard while holding it--you practically have to lay the DX down flat, it becomes so difficult to type.

    3) They merged the number keys with the QWERTY keys (losing a line of keys). What development genius thought it would be helpful and an "improvement?" To go to a location within a book you have to click Menu, choose "go to," then click the Symbols key, choose the numbers you want, then close Symbols before you can choose "location." Whew! Or you can click Alt + the letter button at the top that corresponds to the number you want. Joy.



    4) Before my DX came, I really didn't think this would bother me at all, but I have to say: I really HATE the fact that the "next page" button is only on one side. I mostly use the left hand button. And yes, with the DX's rotation ability you can turn it upside down, placing the "next page" button on the left side.... However, when you do this, the button is so high up that you have to slide your hand (not your thumb, your whole hand) up in order to turn the page. May sound nit-picky, but it is truly a PITA to break off reading to do it. Not only that, but having the keyboard at the top makes it even more top-heavy than when it is right side up!

    5) when you rotate the DX so that it is horizontal, the "next page" button is either at the bottom or the top--in either case you can't just flick your thumb and change the page. Again, a PITA.

    6) If you leave the rotation feature on "Auto" when you are not using your DX it drains your battery, so you must remember to turn the feature off when you stop reading.

    7) Still no folders. An organization nightmare three times bigger than that of the K2 (which itself had increased the same problem on the K1): the possibility of storing 3500 books but only being able to sort them by author, title, and "most recent first."

    EDIT: AMAZON HAS NOW GIVEN ALL KINDLE USERS THE ABILITY TO CREATE "COLLECTIONS." THIS LETS YOU ORGANIZE YOUR BOOKS BY GENRE OR WHATEVER YOU LIKE, SO THAT'S A BIG HELP. HOWEVER, FOR SOME STRANGE REASON, UNLESS YOU RESORT TO FIXES LIKE PUTTING SYMBOLS BEFORE THE COLLECTION NAMES WHEN IN "VIEW BY COLLECTIONS" IT IS IMPOSSIBLE TO ALPHABETIZE THEM! I WOULD HOPE THAT THIS GETS FIXED IN THE NEAR FUTURE WITH A SOFTWARE UPDATE.



    I will be fiercely debating with myself in the next week or so, on whether I really want to keep the DX. It is so disappointing. It has the potential of being a really great e-reader...but as it stands now, it isn't. It's OK. But for $489, it should be a lot more than merely OK.

    EDIT: I DID END UP RETURNING MY DX THE FOLLOWING WEEK. THE PRICE HAS SINCE DROPPED--IT NOW COSTS $379--BUT IT *STILL* ISN'T ALL THAT.

    4-0 out of 5 stars From a first time Kindle buyer: Good, but not perfect, June 11, 2009
    First off, I am a first time kindle buyer, so this review will be more geared to those buyers thinking of entering into the kindle market, not a comparison of past editions.

    My first impression of the Kindle DX was that it was actually very small compared to what I expected. The entire device is slightly smaller (in height and width) than a piece of paper, with the screen taking up approximately 85-90% of the front. This was actually a nice surprise, since I wanted something very portable, but good for magazines/research articles. After seeing the size of the DX, I think a K2 would have been way too small for what I want. At the same time, the device is very hefty. Picking it up, it becomes almost tiring to hold up in one hand for too long (another reason I think this one is better geared toward short articles instead of extended novel reading). It has a nice solid feel to it, but for some reason I was expecting it to be lighter.

    The kindle only takes a couple of seconds to power up and immediately goes to the last article you were reading. A row of buttons are positioned on the right, which let you go to the main home page, go to the next page of an article, previous page, bring up a menu, or go "back". There is also a small four-way joystick to navigate around (which also has the ability to be pressed for selections). The joystick is very sensitive and easy to navigate with, although not overly sensitive that you hit things by mistake (at least very often - it has happened a couple of times so far).

    For those in the market for an ereader and can't decide between the Kindle and another device, I can tell you what made me go toward the Kindle: Whispernet. It is a free, no subscription based service that comes on all Kindles. You get free access to the internet anywhere Sprint reception can be found. You can purchase books/magazines/newspapers anywhere, and have them in less than 60 seconds. You can access the web, check your web-based email, look up directions, find weather reports, movie times, etc. Although the Kindle terms say that normal web browsing might result in extra charges, my assumption is that this clause will just cover amazon if they choose to charge for web in the future. As of right now, everything is free. The Web Browser is very rudimentary and does not show pages very well. Even most pages designed for mobile phones showed up badly for me, although some were okay. The browser is very slow, but could really come in handy if some information was needed and no internet was available.

    I have tried several blogs and magazines, as well as the native pdf viewer and all seem to produce well formatted articles with crisp, clear pictures. Lighter pictures tend to show up better as darker pictures blur together if they do not have enough contrasting elements. The one problem I have noticed with the pdf viewer is that some text/elements can end up being very small and hard to see. The pdf viewer is stuck on one size, which is slightly smaller than most pdf's are intended to be viewed at. There is no way to increase font size, and the only way to zoom is by rotating the display. This zooms in on the top or bottom half of the screen. Rotating to a landscape display actually helps that problem a great deal, but some sort of zoom feature would have been nice. You can search in pdf documents or go to certain pages, but it is impossible to annotate as the Kindle lets you do in normal document files. Pdf documents can be sent to the Kindle DX via usb cable or through a special email that is set up for the device. However, documents that are sent via email are charged a small fee (I was charged $0.45 for a pdf slightly larger than 2MB - I will use the usb cable from now on unless it's absolutely necessary to use email). Blogs I have subscribed to have continuously updated over the time I've had the DX... it is nice to have a constant stream of info to read even when not in the position to surf the web. Most blogs and magazines are subscription based with costs ranging from free to $1.99 or more for the more popular ones. This fact turns many people off since blogs can be found free on the net, but the convenience of having them constantly updated with no internet connection required and brought to you in an easy to read format makes them somewhat worth it in my opinion. Having read through some and watched constant updates while writing this review, I think I will be more likely to keep the blog subscriptions even more than the magazines subscriptions. Most blogs and magazines give you a 14-day trial to see how well you like them before committing to a purchase. They can be organized into separate articles/sections, and are easy to navigate.

    There is a text-to-speech function that can be used in most books (Random House published books excluded because of a lawsuit brought against amazon). The sound of it seems a little old fashioned with an extremely computer-sounding voice, but it is a nice addition. You can also play MP3's, but don't expect extremely high-quality sound. The Kindle DX has a earphone jack on the top of the device, or small speakers on the bottom of the device for these funtctions.

    A keyboard is present at the bottom of the device. It has a QWERTY format, but with the numbers located on the top row of letters (a shift button selects them). It is fairly easy to type on in my opinion, but takes a little getting used to. The buttons are small, rounded and don't take much to push. For this reason, it is difficult to tell if you hit the button acurately or not, and often times you find you hit wrong keys by accident. The Kindle actually tends to be a bit wide to easily type if you have small hands like me. Larger hands should do fine.

    As for the screen, the e-ink is easy to read, easy on the eyes, and it is crisp and has a nice resolution. Highly detailed pictures showed up nicely as long as they weren't too dark. The only complaint I would have about the screen is that it is very reflective. I need to make sure I'm not around any bright lights before reading. Otherwise, the glare interferes.

    SHOULD YOU BUY THE DX?: Well, I think that comes down to what you want to read. The DX is a nice reader (although expensive!). It is probably the perfect size for reading magazine articles, journal articles, and newspapers. The articles come out as being crisp and easy to read, and having them constantly delivered to you is great. I think the device might be a little on the heavy/large side for continous reading of books, so for that, I would probably go with the Kindle 2 instead. For textbooks, I think the verdict is still out. Being able to flip through the pages of textbooks and quickly find information still isn't completely replicated by the Kindle. However, the search features of the Kindle could prove to be invaluable in studying, and there's no doubt the kindle helps in areas of portability. The DX replicates figures and images nicely, but in some textbooks, color is vital. That could be the downfall of the DX when it comes to Textbooks.

    CONS/FOR FUTURE KINDLES: There's quite a few things that prevent the DX from being perfect, but maybe they can be added into future editions. First and foremost: Folders/Organization! Right now, all articles/blogs/newspapers/books get clumped together in one big menu. Why is there no way to organize these and place them in categories? This would be a huge improvement and would take very little effort. Also: Color. As I just mentioned above, color is a huge part of many textbooks, articles, etc. As soon as the technology is ready, a color kindle will be a huge improvement. A memory card slot was included in the first Kindle; however it was removed in the second and DX. This needs to be added back. Especially for those of us with large pdf libraries, we need the extra memory slot. Not to expand the memory so much as to just give us a portable way of getting articles onto the kindle. As of right now, you can be charged to have articles sent to the Kindle, or we can be near a computer. Why not add the memory card slot back and give us one more option? A better web browser, some sort of side-lighting for nighttime reading, touchscreen, thinner, and lighter are other suggestions I can think of to strive for.

    UPDATE: So, after using the DX for a while now, I have come to absolutely love it. Unfortunately, so has my girlfriend, so I don't get to see it much anymore.

    A few small things have come to annoy me though, so I would like to point those out. First, the screen rotation is becoming more and more annoying. I find the screen rotating on me many times when I don't want it to. Slightly changing the position of the device suddenly leads to the screen being rotated, and then it takes another few seconds of shifting it around to get it back the way you want. There should be a way to turn screen rotation off if you know you won't want it bothering you for a while. A simple setting could then be turned on again for normal use. (UPDATE: Apparently, you can disable the auto-rotation. User A.Nichols wrote in the comments: "Push the button with the Aa (to change font size) and you'll find the option to set change screen rotation from Auto (default) to portrait. I found the screen rotation to be annoying also when reading, it's easy to accidentally change the angle.")

    Another thing that has come to bother me is the screen lag. Very often, it's as though the screen sticks after you push buttons. You push them again and again, and then the screen finally unsticks and you fly through 3-4 pages. It's difficult to tell if the device didn't register the button you pushed or if it's just running behind. Unfortunately, this has resulted in my purchasing a book that I didn't mean to (amazon was nice enough to remove the charge though). Usually you get a "Would you like to cancel your order?" immediately after purchasing on the kindle, but this time I guess I pushed too much and flew through that screen too.

    Even with these small issues, I can't put my Kindle down. It is the best money I have spent in a long time.

    2-0 out of 5 stars OK device, terrible warranty, June 25, 2009
    I have had my Kindle DX for about two months and am mostly pleased with it--it works well for reading, and the display is easy to read--but I wish it had better support for PDFs. Yes, they display, but if you don't like the way it zooms, you can't do anything about it except rotate the device; you should be able to to some manual tweaking. Additionally, you cannot make annotations on PDFs (I understand why you can't highlight, but there's no reason you shouldn't be able to make notes for a page as a whole). I was hoping to use this more for grad school, but I don't think students or professionals with a lot of PDFs to read will find this useful, unless they are formatted specifically with the Kindle in mind.

    Additionally, my screen has recently developed a defect. Namely, I have horizontal and vertical lines, in addition to a portion of the display that is stuck black. I did not do anything unsual to my device like smash it or drop it, but Amazon refuses to replace the Kindle because they claim it is not covered under the 1-year limited warranty (even though, while I am not a lawyer, it certainly seems to be if you actually read it: "We warrant the Device against defects in materials and workmanship under ordinary consumer use for one year from the date of original retail purchase...."). Further, some people HAVE had their Kindles replaced (even when it is cleary their fault!), so it seems to be hit or miss depending on who you get on the other end of the phone. If you buy this device, I recommend treating it like a piece of glass: very carefully, always in a caseor sleeve, and DO get the extended warranty--except you'd be better off buying a warranty from SquareTrade at a much more reasonable price than Amazon's.

    In the mean time, I have a $389 brick that Amazon won't replace. You should NOT have to buy an extra warranty to have damage resulting from normal use and handling of the device be covered (and, depending on who at Amazon you talk to, you apparently don't). But because of the sketchy 1-year warranty, I cannot recommend that anyone buy this device; Amazon needs to stand by it better, with or without the extended 2-year warranty (although you'd be better off purchasing a similar third-party warranty for less). The device is OK (good, not great); the customer support with regard to warranty (they *were* good when I made an accidental purchase on the Kindle) is terrible.

    EDIT: After a month-long battle with customer service, they finally agreed to replace my device. It has been functioning fine since then, but my original complains about reading (particularly PDFs) still stands, and the warranty battle should have never happened.

    5-0 out of 5 stars Going to buy the GRAY!! Sorry Sony PRS-505... I'm moving on, June 11, 2009
    July 5 update: I've apparently been living under an e-reader rock because today is the first day I hear of the new dark gray DX. If you are contemplating the whether to go with the white or gray DX -- DON'T EVEN THINK ABOUT IT!! Get the gray!! The one thing I learned with my Sony Readers is that the darker the bezel -- the more contrast between the screen and the easier it is to read. So even if the screen and nothing in the e-ink display has changed and everything else is the same except for the color of the bezel -- the darker bezel will make for an easier more constrasty reading experience. FINALLY, Amazon gets a clue and realizes that the darker bezel will make for better reading though it may not look as "nice" as the white!

    FIRMWARE UPDATE as of 11.30.2009:

    I have now M-Edge Platform Jacket for Kindle DX (Genuine Leather--Pebbled Navy)--Back to School Sale!! because you can set the Kindle up to stand by itself on the table next to you or a lap desk. This makes it easier to to view music, knitting patterns, or just plain books (addressing some users complaints about it being "too heavy" to hold comfortably).

    I had been disappointed that the Kindle automatically goes to sleep after 5 minutes because if you are using the Kindle for reading patterns or music, it times out on you while you are still "working" on a page. However, Amazon come out with a new firmware release... the Kindle DX now stays on for 20 minutes before going into screen saver mode which is a big improvement.

    In addition, with the new firmware, you have the option of converting your PDFs to Kindle format -- which should address the lack of "zoom" and "annotation" features -- at least there is a workaround for now.

    UPDATE as of 06.16.2009: The Kindle may have just literally saved my career and saved my "backend". I had an interview yesterday and thought I knew where I was going. I'm one of the last dinosaurs not to have a Garmin and got lost. After circling around for awhile and getting more and more uptight about missing my interview, I remembered the Browser on the Kindle.

    On the K2, the browser was basically unusable because of the size. However, with the DX, I was able to go to Google Maps, look up the address and had my directions in just a couple of seconds. The map was rendered beautifully and the turn-by-turn directions could be bookmarked and even if my DX fell asleep, it awoke still displaying the directions. THANK YOU KINDLE!!!

    ---------------------------------------------

    The UPS truck arrived a couple of hours ago. I feel like a kid on Christmas Day and I got (just about) everything I wanted!

    My Sony PRS-505 has finally and officially become my "Emergency Backup Reader"

    My romance with ebook readers got off to a bumpy start when I got my first eInk device -- the Cybook Bookeen. Firmware issues and awkward buttons made it rather disappointing.

    Then I found true love with the Sony PRS-505. I loved the metal case. I loved the "Collections" (essentially folders features). I loved the looks and loved the display.

    However, the Kindle 2 woo'ed me with the size of its content collection. However, for reading I still ultimately preferred my Sony.

    Now, with the larger Kindle DX, I've set my Sony aside and there is a new love in my life. Let me count the ways:

    1. SCREEN SIZE: Reading on the Kindle DX vs 6" readers is like the difference between sleeping in a King sized bed vs a Twin Bed or riding in the backseat of a 2-door 1981 Honda Accord vs bucket seats in a Honda Odyssey. You feel like you have room to breath. The larger screen allows you to maximize the use of the real estate -- taking advantage of larger fonts and more white space. This makes text much easier to read -- even if you are just reading regular books.

    2. KEYBOARD: I also love that they have compacted the keyboard so that it doesn't dominate the overall appearance of the device. The smaller keyboard in no way compromises the ability to type. However, it improves the look by making the proportions more appealing and it means the device isn't horrifically larger than the 6" device.

    3. PDF + BIG SCREEN = LOTS MORE USES: I can transfer my knitting patterns (complete with knitting graphs and diagrams) and cello music to my e-reader.

    Using the Kindle for knitting -- I can highlight my place in the knitting pattern making it easier to work more complicated stitch patterns.

    I play cello and many of my music books are available in PDF format -- again the Kindle is wonderful for carrying all my music with me at one time. Turning pages is faster and easier than with a physical book. The kindle sits well on the music stand (though you want to make sure the tray of the music stand is taller than the Kindle or the Kindle will be "top heavy" making the bottom slide forward and potentially falling off the stand.

    4. SCREEN ROTATION -- You can rotate the screen in any direction and the page quickly re-orients itself. You can keep rotating 360 degrees and the screen follows you. The buttons remain the same but the thumb stick also reorients so that if you push right relative to the current orientation, that always means "page forward" no matter what direction you are in.

    If you are left handed and really bothered by having the buttons only on the right side, you can turn the device upside down and voila -- now your buttons are on the left side.

    5. BUTTON CONFIGURATION -- I actually PREFER having the next page and back page on the same side and in a contiguous location (as opposed to opposite sides of the device like the Kindle 2). It makes one-handed reading easier without having to reach over to the other side of the device to flip back and forth.

    6. SOLID feeling -- I like the heavier feel -- it is comparable to the heft of a hardbound book.

    7. READING While charging -- this sounds like a little thing but with the Sony, if you have the device plugged in for charging, you can't read on the device at the same time.

    There are a two things I still think the Sony does better:

    1. COLLECTIONS: It would be nice to have folders so that music could be separated from technical books which is also separated from knitting patterns etc. The absence of folders is even MORE annoying on the DX because you are likely to have a much more diverse collection of books/documents on there.

    2. EPUB SUPPORT: ePUB would allow users to acquire content from public libraries and virtually any other online ebookseller. But that is basically why Amazon isn't doing that... they WANT you to only get your content from them. Frankly, the ability to view PDFs without having to do a bunch of emailing back in forth is a huge leap forward so I guess it is sort of a "baby steps" thing.

    Sony has just really dropped the ball by not bringing out a larger format. You wouldn't think that a couple of extra inches on the screen would make that much of a difference in terms of your reading enjoyment. But then again, going from a 17" monitor to a 19" monitor is a huge difference in terms of usability of a computer screen.

    All in all -- Amazon really made a brilliant move with the DX. It is clear that they have really thought through the little things this time around and even the DX is a substantial improvement over the K2. I'm very very happy!

    [NCJAR]

    1-0 out of 5 stars DO NOT BUY THIS PRODUCT!! AMAZON WILL DENY WARRANTY WHEN UNIT DEFECTIVE!!, September 8, 2009
    My Kindle DX shipped July 30. I really liked it until today. There is a white out on about 1/12 of screen so you cannot read many words on the page and the text is running veritical and horizontal at the same time. The product has not been dropped or otherwise damaged during use. When I called Amazon Kindle support they said they had never heard of problem, even though I told them I found in a few seconds on the web. They asked me to reset, which I did, but problem persisted. I was then told that the problem was not covered by warranty!!!!!!!!!!! I asked how could they know that without looking at device and they said it was not on known list of manufacturer defects. They told me to not even bother sending it in for warranty service but if I wanted a new one, I could pay them $250.00!! I spoke to 2 supervisors at the Washington call center who gave me the same line. Amazon is not standng behind this product, and this is the worst example of poor customer service I have encountered. I asked them how could they make a technical diagnosis over phone and they had no good answer, just kept repeating that it was not a covered defect. I asked them why they would not just say "send it in and we will take a look at it", and they said it was a waste of time because it was not covered (even though they were 3000 miles away from unit and had not seen it) They wiggled when I demanded a written explanantion of denial of warranty service ( which to me is breach of contract.Kindle DX: Amazon's 9.7" Wireless Reading Device (Latest Generation) DO NOT BUY THIS PRODUCT. Amazon should be ashamed of itself. They have lost a valuable and up to now loyal customer.

    5-0 out of 5 stars Kindle DX first impressions from a former Kindle 2 user, June 11, 2009
    Here are my first impressions of the Kindle DX which I received earlier today. I've been using the Kindle 2 for the past three months and have loved it. It has improved the way I read by making it easy to download and try books before purchasing them, and allowing me to carry a variety of reading material with me. I was disappointed with the way it handled PDF's, which is important to me, so I sold the Kindle 2 and bought the DX.

    - The DX works like the Kindle 2 in terms of keys, navigation, joystick etc., except all the navigation keys are on the right.
    - Was concerned about lack of navigation on the left, but if you flip it 180 degrees, the display auto rotates and you can use your left hand. Very slick.
    - The DX is heavier, but is still comfortable to hold and read.
    - The overall size of the DX is not as big as I expected from the pictures on the web.
    - The digital ink looks similar on both, but a little sharper on the DX.
    - The DX works much better for PDF's overall. The bigger screen really helps here.
    - A complex powerpoint I converted to pdf looks just like it does on my pc except in b&w.
    - PDF's with columns work fine. I couldn't read them on the Kindle 2.
    - If you have a PDF with multiple columns, the print may appear small on the DX, and you can't adjust fonts in PDFs.
    - Newspapers are easier to read on the DX, especially pics and tables.
    - I downloaded a sample chapter of a textbook. I can see this working well for students.
    - The rotate feature is excellent on the DX; works as advertised.
    - The Kindle 2 weighs less and is more portable. If reading only books, I'd probably prefer the Kindle 2, given the lower price and size, and nav keys on both sides.

    Regarding the price, while I'd love Kindles to cost less, I think the price is reasonable. Here's how I justified it. I assumed I could resell the DX in 2 years for 50% of its purchase price, or $245. (50% seems reasonable based on the experience of Kindle 1). So my net cost is $245. The differentiating feature of the Kindle is the built in wireless capability. Not only is it elegant and integrated, it is also included in the purchase price. If unlimited wireless were priced separately, a reasonable price would be around $10/month. So effectively my out of pocket cost using the DX for 2 years is roughly equivalent to what the wireless would cost me if it was priced separately.

    Both the DX and Kindle 2 are good values. If you only read books, the Kindle 2 is probably better. If you already own a Kindle 2, and don't read PDF's, I recommend keeping your Kindle 2. If you read a lot of pdf's or newspapers, or you like to read with large fonts, you'll be happier with the DX. For my needs, I like the DX more.

    3-0 out of 5 stars Not "the answer" for academics and professionals, June 14, 2009
    As a grad student who is tired of printing out scores of journal articles or straining my eyes (and sucking battery power) reading them on a conventional computer screen, I have been eagerly watching the evolution of e-book devices waiting for one that would meet the needs of academics and professionals who are constantly reading, highlighting, and annotating documents and books. Because Amazon has marketed the Kindle DX as the e-reader for academics and professionals, highlighting its large screen and native PDF support, I finally thought that this was a product suitable for types like me and forked out the five hundred dollars for the DX. Alas, upon receiving the Kindle yesterday in the mail, it did not take long to realize that this machine is not the "answer" that I had hoped it would be. The reason is simple: no highlighting or annotating PDFs, Word documents, and other personal documents. It did not even occur to me to inquire, before purchasing the DX, whether highlighting and annotating PDFs and Word docs was possible. After all, one can easily acquire free software that enables one to do this on a computer (e.g. Skim for Macs), and in the Kindle DX press conference Amazon made a big deal about bringing reality to paperless workplaces, putting an end to the routine of printing out document after document. Well, surely one of the major reasons people print out documents is so that they can mark on them with underlinings, highlights, and notes. And given that one cannot do that for PDFs and other documents on a Kindle DX, Amazon's sales pitch is quite misleading: anyone who needs to interact with documents in the way typical of academics and professionals will still need to print out those documents (or make due on an eye-straining and power-consuming computer). Not only is it impossible to add an annotation to a specific passage in a PDF or Word document, one cannot add any annotations whatsoever, even at the page level (or document level, for that matter). Clipping/highlighting support is also completely absent. This is frankly unacceptable for a product marketed as the Kindle for students and professionals.

    As I'm sure other reviews here will attest, the Kindle DX is in other respects a beautiful and wonderful machine. If you just want to read PDFs, and have no desire to annotate or highlight them, then this would be a very satisfying device. And if you only need to annotate and/or highlight books (and can find the books you need in the Kindle store and can afford to buy them!), then the DX will be a wonderful piece of equipment to own. But if you are a typical student, academic or professional who needs to interact with your documents (and not just read them), and are looking for something that will replace the need to print documents or read them on your computer, the DX simply does not fit the bill. Wait for the next product, or for Amazon to update their firmware with respectable support for PDFs and other document types. I'll be mailing my Kindle back to Amazon tomorrow.

    1-0 out of 5 stars Kindle DX - Amazon's Apathy and Greed At Work, July 31, 2009
    First, let me say that I purchased and use my Kindle DX daily. I thought about how to accurately write this review for some time now. When it gets right down to it, all eReaders on the market - and the flood now hitting the market - use the same e-ink panels made by the same company, generally have the same features as far as reading an actual book, etc. When this was a niche product in a market with no real competition than the product would get a much higher rating. However, it is now a market with many choices. The only way to be fair about writing a review is to assume that there are some basic functions that MUST exist (wireless access, reader screen quality, basic zoom/bookmark features, etc.) that all e-readers today have. The review should be what is UNIQUE about the Kindle DX and review those features. If you just want to download a book and read it on an e-ink panel than every single e-reader on the market today will work fine.

    To that end, when looking at what makes the DX unique, I have to honestly say that I would not purchase this reader again - there are better options out there with several more just announced. After careful consideration, it becomes clear that Amazon just felt that they could get away with a sub-par device based on their name and position in the market.

    1) PDF issues: This is a larger format reader, presumably for the purpose of reading standard sized documents (8.5" by 11"). It is also being marketed heavily to students. Both of these demand native full PDF support. While the Kindle DX does render PDF's, it does so in an extremely crippled way. While I am well versed with the fact that some PDF's are rendered as images and the document itself does not contain links or text, most do. Despite that fact the Kindle does not allow you to change font size, add bookmarks, highlight text, use the dictionary feature, zoom in, use any links (i.e., the Table of Contents), etc. In other words, it presents that pages as pictures and provides absolutely zero "digital control" over the documents - the very features that someone would want to use an electronic reader instead of a hardcopy for. I purchased this device as an engineer because I have hundreds of PDF's (manuals, client systems documentation, etc.). I have found that I am completely unable to use it for the reason I purchased it for. Other readers treat PDF's as any other document allowing all the same e-reader functions and there is no reason - short of not wanting to pay Adobe a license fee - that the Kindle does not have this same functionality.

    2) File formats: While the Kindle DX does support several file formats, Amazon is one of the last holdouts to insist on providing content in a DRM protected proprietary format. They also do not read many industry standard formats. CHM and LIT are two of the HUGE formats that come to mind. Many publishers - especially of technology books - release in CHM format, essentially a slightly marked up HTML derivative that should be easy to render. MOBI and others come to mind as well - with over 1,000,000 public domain titles available from many web sites in these other formats. Yes, I understand protecting content - but Amazon has gone overboard in trying to lock down the Kindle to only offer "all the features" on their proprietary format. This locks you in to buying eBooks from the Kindle store. I understand the financial drive to do that - but most of us have documents that we have created, or content we have previously purchased for other platforms and have rights to, that we would like to read on the Kindle. Devices that restrict access to their own formats are generally given away or sold for a very low cost, with the understanding that the profit will be made on content (think about some of the original movie on demand set-top devices). Amazon is selling this as a standalone device, and needs to not intentionally cripple it. And yes, there are tools to convert file type - which usually result in formatting issues and the burden should be placed on the end user.

    3) File System Flaws: Amazon advertises the ability to hold 3,500+ books/documents (a HUGE exaggerating in and of itself). Even if it held 350 titles, the file system has a HUGE problem. There are no ways to create any type of folder structure. You have to go to a single large flat listing of the documents on the reader and hit Next Page over and over - a painfully slow process in and of itself - and hope do don't miss the title you were looking for and have to start over. Yes, the titles do start in alphabetical order, but they change based on most recently read being moved to the top. It is a ridiculous and unrealistic expectation to put more than a couple dozen documents on a device without any way to organize them into folders. The official Amazon reply: You can add tags and search by tags. Yep, you can - and if you want to take the couple weeks it would take to add tags to a couple thousand PDF's then you have far more free time than I do. The Kindle was purchased to save time - not to use my entire annual vacation time to organize it.

    4) No Card Reader: For some unknown reason, Amazon decided to not include any type of card reader. The memory can hold a large number of books - but PDF's can get to be 100MB or more if they are heavily diagrammed. The memory cannot be upgraded, so there should be some method to pop in a memory card. All of my cells phones have had this feature...and my $500 Kindle DX does not?

    5) Ergonomics: I admit that the e-reader market is emerging so there has not been a large pool of users to pull opinions from. That said, it seems that the Kindle DX made it through the art department and skipped the usability testing department. While it looks great and each to carry, the 5-way joystick thing, the lack of Next/Previous page buttons on both sides (that existed on previous models) and the absolute worst keyboard I have ever touched do not help the device. Again - being marketed to students and professionals - just look at the official page on the Amazon site. What is on the screen on the largest image there? It is a power plant diagram - not a page from a NYT Best Seller list. There should be a way to quickly type notes on things. There is no possible way a student could sit in a lecture and flip through pages and be able to type in notes and keep up with the class on this thing - completely unrealistic.

    6) No Desktop Application: While Amazon advertises that no computer is required, they leave out the fact that even if you had one there isn't really anything you could do with it. There should be some application similar to Apple's iTunes that will auto convert file formats and allow organization of files and folders (if they existed), allow backup in case the device is lost/stolen/damaged and needs to be replaced, etc. This is especially true for students that would desire a full sized keyboard to add notes to documents/books and sync with the Kindle.

    Bottom line: The Kindle DX is an absolutely great e-reader for someone that wants to simply read books, is comfortable buying only Kindle content and just desires a larger screen. This is what I am now using it for. To this end it works great. If this is your only expectation - then get out the credit card. If you have fantasies of using it to actually read PDF's with any functionality, store a large number of documents, use it in a classroom setting, etc. then get a different e-reader and sacrifice battery life and get a tablet or laptop and wait for the next generation.

    4-0 out of 5 stars Perspective from a biomedical researcher, June 12, 2009
    I don't generally write reviews, but I hope this one will be useful for other scientists who are contemplating a Kindle DX. My use for the DX will be different from most of the users who have posted reviews. I maintain a library of nearly 4,000 PDF manuscripts/grants/documents. I probably have minimal use for eBooks from the Kindle Store. The number of PDFs is constantly growing as new research manuscripts are published (and downloaded to my computer). My principle reasons for purchasing a DX were to:

    1) Carry the electronic equivalent of binders of PDFs with me when traveling. An iPod for PDFs. This is a metaphor that works for the way that I view an eReader, though it probably doesn't apply equally well to everyone.

    2) Have an easier way to read papers when traveling. Easier means not worrying about battery life, unfurling a laptop in a cramped airplane, or carrying a bag full of papers.

    3) Reduce eye strain from staring at a computer screen by moving serious reading from the laptop screen to the DX.

    From my preliminary use, I think the DX is a qualified success. Text in manuscripts looks great. Figures from manuscripts do not render well in portrait mode if there is a lot of detail; switching to landscape mode helps substantially. Zoom into individual images/sections of PDFs would be welcome.

    Navigating large numbers of PDFs from the home screen is currently clumsy. Lack of directory support to organize large numbers of files is an issue. I've read about users using complex naming conventions to use 'search' as an indirect way to find files. Renaming hundreds (or thousands) of files to make them easier to find is not a great solution. I suspect this will improve in time, either through a firmware update to this device or in the next generation of hardware.

    I'm also hoping against hope that one or more of the reference manager software providers (Bookends, I'm looking at you) realizes that their software is to the Kindle as iTunes is to the iPod. If I could manage the content of my Kindle through a reference manager, I would be thrilled. The idea of downloading a paper and syncing it in one step to the Kindle to take with me is really appealing. This wouldn't completely overcome the problem with a flat file hierarchy once the papers are on the Kindle, but it would help organize getting content onto and off the device.

    The biggest surprise to me is the functionality of the web browser. Yes, it is pokey to render pages. No, I wouldn't want to use it to web surf. But if I had a destination web site that is heavy on content, I think reading on the Kindle will be vastly superior to reading on the iPhone or other mobile/tablet devices. I do doubt, however, that wireless data access will remain free on the Kindle long-term. I can't imagine how Amazon will be able to continue subsidizing the data costs. I think that this is a feature that should be enjoyed while it lasts, but I wouldn't be surprised if it goes away at some point in the future.

    Though it adds another $50 to the cost, I think the matching case is attractive, functional, and creates an easy-to-carry package.

    So is it worth the high cost? I don't think I (or anyone) can really evaluate that until determining how well it integrates into daily work habits. I suspect that I will get heavy use out of it, but then I read a ton of PDFs. I do hope that the PDF support for dictionary lookup, highlighting, and annotation improves, but I base my review on what the product does - not what I would like it to do.

    Hope this helps other heavy PDF users!

    5-0 out of 5 stars Different and Better, June 11, 2009
    I have owned both Kindle 1 and Kindle 2, so I'm already committed to the basic idea: e-ink reading in a slim form factor with excellent connectivity to a large selection of books and subscriptions. I have come to rely on my Kindle experience, and it has seriously enhanced my reading.

    The DX was not an obvious upgrade for me, but two features put me over the edge: the larger screen, and the native PDF reader. I now have the DX in my hands, and can report PROS, CONS, and NEUTRALS:

    PROS:

    -- the larger screen is a definite plus. I use the larger type size on my Kindle 2 (older eyes), and at this type size I get far more text per page on the DX. This makes the whole reading experience more book-like (and should be a boon to people who buy large-print books.)

    -- the screen is also sharper and crisper than my Kindle 2 in a side-by-side comparison: the text is darker, and the contrast is much better, making for better visibility overall.

    -- on a side note, the larger screen also makes it possible to read poetry on the kindle, even at large type sizes. On earlier Kindles, the smaller screen cut off lines, so that you would lose the sense of when the poet ended the line. On the DX, you can see the whole line exactly as the poet meant it, with the cut-off in the right spot.

    -- the PDF reader works as advertised, and is extremely convenient. PDF documents appear on the DX exactly as they do on a computer screen. Moreover, you can drag and drop your documents directly to the device using the USB cable (or use the for-a-fee email if you absolutely must.) The only downside: at least for the documents that I've used so far, I cannot adjust the type size as I can with native Kindle documents.

    -- screen rotation also works as advertised: it operates as a mild zoom on both graphics and text and offsets slightly the downside of not being able to adjust the typesize on PDF documents. One nice design touch: the four-way navigation stick introduced on the Kindle 2 is rotation-sensitive, and will move as expected relative to the screen rotation.

    -- more of the device space is devoted to the screen, while the white plastic border around the screen seems to have shrunk, both in general and compared to the proportion of screen to plastic on the Kindle 2. I like this (but see below about the keyboard).

    -- storage: I like the increase in storage space, and don't mind the lack of an external storage card. I can see some people having trouble with this, but only those folks who either a) must regularly carry around PDF documents totalling more than 3.5 GB of space or b) must have nearly 3500 books regularly at their fingertips. I fall in neither category.

    CONS:

    -- price: it's expensive, as you can tell pretty quickly. If you value the larger size, and the native PDF reader, these features may justify the roughly 30% premium you pay for the DX over the Kindle 2. In truth, the DX SHOULD cost more than the Kindle 2, and a 30% premium isn't unreasonable. But, for my money, Amazon should drop the price on the Kindle 2 to $300 or so, and charge $400 or a little less for the DX. Still, I bought it, and will keep it at this price.

    -- one-sided navigation buttons: all of the buttons are now on the right side, and none are on the left. I'm a righty, so I shouldn't complain, but I found myself using both sides on the Kindle 2. Lefties have reason to complain, I think.

    -- One-handed handling: I often read while I walk, with my Kindle in one hand, and something else in my other. Because of the button layout, this will be more difficult on the DX.

    -- metal backing: I miss the tacky rubberized backing on my Kindle 1. When I placed my Kindle 1 on an inclined surface, it stayed in place. Not so my Kindle 2 and now my DX. This is not a complaint specific to the DX, but it's still there.

    NEUTRALS (i.e. things worth noting):

    -- weight: the DX is heavier, noticeably so. This is only an issue if, like me, you regularly use the kindle with one hand . . . and even so, it's still doable.

    -- keyboard: the keyboard has 4 rows, and not 5: the top row of numbers from the Kindle 1 and 2 has been merged into the top qwerty row, so that numbers are now only accessible with an alt-key combination. The keys are vertically thinner too, so that the whole keyboard is no more than 1" tall (compared to over an 1.5" on the Kindle 2). At the same time, the keys themselves are a bit easier to press, a bit more protruding than on the Kindle 2. For someone with big fingers (like me), this will be a slightly harder keyboard to use, but only slightly.

    That's all I can see. Overall, the pluses outweigh the minuses for me, and I'm satisfied with my purchase. I can now think of using my DX for work documents on a regular basis, because of the PDF reader. The screen size and screen rotation make the overall reading experience more immersive.

    Overall, the DX feels more like text and less like device and comes closer to the stated goal of the Kindle: for the device to disappear, leaving only the joy of reading.







    3-0 out of 5 stars DX not quite all that--but has been improved a bit, June 13, 2009
    This review was written back when the DX first came out and--as has been brought to my attention--needs to be updated a bit. I will indicate where things have changed for the better within the body of the review:

    I owned the K1 and then the K2 and love them both, so I was really looking forward to the DX. My plan was to use the DX at home, and keep my K2 for carrying all over creation with me. It wasn't long, though, after my DX arrived the day before yesterday before disappointment set in.

    Don't get me wrong, there is a LOT to like about the DX:

    1) Pictures are awesome on it, if the publisher formats them properly.

    2) Those who complain about darkness of text on their K2 (a problem I've never had, btw) will be thrilled by the DX's very dark text.

    EDIT: LIKE THE KINDLE 3, THE DX NOW SPORTS A NEW E-INK DISPLAY THAT HAS MUCH BETTER CONTRAST, SO TEXT & PICTURES REALLY "POP."


    3) The ability to rotate the screen is great. Gives you a closer look at things like maps and charts.

    4) The browser is a bit faster than on the K1 or K2, though that isn't saying much--it is still very clunky to use.

    EDIT: THOUGH STILL CLUNKY, THE BROWSER *HAS* BEEN IMPROVED FOR EASIER USE. BUT STILL DON'T PLAN TO DO A LOT OF WEB SURFING WITH IT.


    5) But web pages look pretty good on the DX.

    6) It holds 3500 books.


    BUT.....the DX just isn't all that. It has drawbacks that are really making me consider sending it back before my 30 days are up:

    1) First and foremost, while it is true that it natively reads PDFs, it is really only a PDF *viewer*. You can't change the font size on PDFs, links will not function on them, and the ability to magnify pictures doesn't work on them either. So you better have LARGE fonts on your PDF before you load it. Looking at the PDF in horizontal mode helps a bit, but not by much.

    EDIT: WE NOW HAVE THE ABILITY TO ZOOM IN ON PDF DOCUMENTS, WHICH HELPS IN READING THEM--BUT IT WOULD STILL BEHOOVE USERS TO USE LARGER FONT SIZES IN DOCUMENTS BEFORE CONVERTING TO PDF FORMAT.



    2) The DX is too big to hold comfortably. It's not really all that heavy, but it is top heavy and you feel a pull on your hands. And that pull is really evident if you try to use the keyboard while holding it--you practically have to lay the DX down flat, it becomes so difficult to type.

    3) They merged the number keys with the QWERTY keys (losing a line of keys). What development genius thought it would be helpful and an "improvement?" To go to a location within a book you have to click Menu, choose "go to," then click the Symbols key, choose the numbers you want, then close Symbols before you can choose "location." Whew! Or you can click Alt + the letter button at the top that corresponds to the number you want. Joy.



    4) Before my DX came, I really didn't think this would bother me at all, but I have to say: I really HATE the fact that the "next page" button is only on one side. I mostly use the left hand button. And yes, with the DX's rotation ability you can turn it upside down, placing the "next page" button on the left side.... However, when you do this, the button is so high up that you have to slide your hand (not your thumb, your whole hand) up in order to turn the page. May sound nit-picky, but it is truly a PITA to break off reading to do it. Not only that, but having the keyboard at the top makes it even more top-heavy than when it is right side up!

    5) when you rotate the DX so that it is horizontal, the "next page" button is either at the bottom or the top--in either case you can't just flick your thumb and change the page. Again, a PITA.

    6) If you leave the rotation feature on "Auto" when you are not using your DX it drains your battery, so you must remember to turn the feature off when you stop reading.

    7) Still no folders. An organization nightmare three times bigger than that of the K2 (which itself had increased the same problem on the K1): the possibility of storing 3500 books but only being able to sort them by author, title, and "most recent first."

    EDIT: AMAZON HAS NOW GIVEN ALL KINDLE USERS THE ABILITY TO CREATE "COLLECTIONS." THIS LETS YOU ORGANIZE YOUR BOOKS BY GENRE OR WHATEVER YOU LIKE, SO THAT'S A BIG HELP. HOWEVER, FOR SOME STRANGE REASON, UNLESS YOU RESORT TO FIXES LIKE PUTTING SYMBOLS BEFORE THE COLLECTION NAMES WHEN IN "VIEW BY COLLECTIONS" IT IS IMPOSSIBLE TO ALPHABETIZE THEM! I WOULD HOPE THAT THIS GETS FIXED IN THE NEAR FUTURE WITH A SOFTWARE UPDATE.



    I will be fiercely debating with myself in the next week or so, on whether I really want to keep the DX. It is so disappointing. It has the potential of being a really great e-reader...but as it stands now, it isn't. It's OK. But for $489, it should be a lot more than merely OK.

    EDIT: I DID END UP RETURNING MY DX THE FOLLOWING WEEK. THE PRICE HAS SINCE DROPPED--IT NOW COSTS $379--BUT IT *STILL* ISN'T ALL THAT.

    4-0 out of 5 stars From a first time Kindle buyer: Good, but not perfect, June 11, 2009
    First off, I am a first time kindle buyer, so this review will be more geared to those buyers thinking of entering into the kindle market, not a comparison of past editions.

    My first impression of the Kindle DX was that it was actually very small compared to what I expected. The entire device is slightly smaller (in height and width) than a piece of paper, with the screen taking up approximately 85-90% of the front. This was actually a nice surprise, since I wanted something very portable, but good for magazines/research articles. After seeing the size of the DX, I think a K2 would have been way too small for what I want. At the same time, the device is very hefty. Picking it up, it becomes almost tiring to hold up in one hand for too long (another reason I think this one is better geared toward short articles instead of extended novel reading). It has a nice solid feel to it, but for some reason I was expecting it to be lighter.

    The kindle only takes a couple of seconds to power up and immediately goes to the last article you were reading. A row of buttons are positioned on the right, which let you go to the main home page, go to the next page of an article, previous page, bring up a menu, or go "back". There is also a small four-way joystick to navigate around (which also has the ability to be pressed for selections). The joystick is very sensitive and easy to navigate with, although not overly sensitive that you hit things by mistake (at least very often - it has happened a couple of times so far).

    For those in the market for an ereader and can't decide between the Kindle and another device, I can tell you what made me go toward the Kindle: Whispernet. It is a free, no subscription based service that comes on all Kindles. You get free access to the internet anywhere Sprint reception can be found. You can purchase books/magazines/newspapers anywhere, and have them in less than 60 seconds. You can access the web, check your web-based email, look up directions, find weather reports, movie times, etc. Although the Kindle terms say that normal web browsing might result in extra charges, my assumption is that this clause will just cover amazon if they choose to charge for web in the future. As of right now, everything is free. The Web Browser is very rudimentary and does not show pages very well. Even most pages designed for mobile phones showed up badly for me, although some were okay. The browser is very slow, but could really come in handy if some information was needed and no internet was available.

    I have tried several blogs and magazines, as well as the native pdf viewer and all seem to produce well formatted articles with crisp, clear pictures. Lighter pictures tend to show up better as darker pictures blur together if they do not have enough contrasting elements. The one problem I have noticed with the pdf viewer is that some text/elements can end up being very small and hard to see. The pdf viewer is stuck on one size, which is slightly smaller than most pdf's are intended to be viewed at. There is no way to increase font size, and the only way to zoom is by rotating the display. This zooms in on the top or bottom half of the screen. Rotating to a landscape display actually helps that problem a great deal, but some sort of zoom feature would have been nice. You can search in pdf documents or go to certain pages, but it is impossible to annotate as the Kindle lets you do in normal document files. Pdf documents can be sent to the Kindle DX via usb cable or through a special email that is set up for the device. However, documents that are sent via email are charged a small fee (I was charged $0.45 for a pdf slightly larger than 2MB - I will use the usb cable from now on unless it's absolutely necessary to use email). Blogs I have subscribed to have continuously updated over the time I've had the DX... it is nice to have a constant stream of info to read even when not in the position to surf the web. Most blogs and magazines are subscription based with costs ranging from free to $1.99 or more for the more popular ones. This fact turns many people off since blogs can be found free on the net, but the convenience of having them constantly updated with no internet connection required and brought to you in an easy to read format makes them somewhat worth it in my opinion. Having read through some and watched constant updates while writing this review, I think I will be more likely to keep the blog subscriptions even more than the magazines subscriptions. Most blogs and magazines give you a 14-day trial to see how well you like them before committing to a purchase. They can be organized into separate articles/sections, and are easy to navigate.

    There is a text-to-speech function that can be used in most books (Random House published books excluded because of a lawsuit brought against amazon). The sound of it seems a little old fashioned with an extremely computer-sounding voice, but it is a nice addition. You can also play MP3's, but don't expect extremely high-quality sound. The Kindle DX has a earphone jack on the top of the device, or small speakers on the bottom of the device for these funtctions.

    A keyboard is present at the bottom of the device. It has a QWERTY format, but with the numbers located on the top row of letters (a shift button selects them). It is fairly easy to type on in my opinion, but takes a little getting used to. The buttons are small, rounded and don't take much to push. For this reason, it is difficult to tell if you hit the button acurately or not, and often times you find you hit wrong keys by accident. The Kindle actually tends to be a bit wide to easily type if you have small hands like me. Larger hands should do fine.

    As for the screen, the e-ink is easy to read, easy on the eyes, and it is crisp and has a nice resolution. Highly detailed pictures showed up nicely as long as they weren't too dark. The only complaint I would have about the screen is that it is very reflective. I need to make sure I'm not around any bright lights before reading. Otherwise, the glare interferes.

    SHOULD YOU BUY THE DX?: Well, I think that comes down to what you want to read. The DX is a nice reader (although expensive!). It is probably the perfect size for reading magazine articles, journal articles, and newspapers. The articles come out as being crisp and easy to read, and having them constantly delivered to you is great. I think the device might be a little on the heavy/large side for continous reading of books, so for that, I would probably go with the Kindle 2 instead. For textbooks, I think the verdict is still out. Being able to flip through the pages of textbooks and quickly find information still isn't completely replicated by the Kindle. However, the search features of the Kindle could prove to be invaluable in studying, and there's no doubt the kindle helps in areas of portability. The DX replicates figures and images nicely, but in some textbooks, color is vital. That could be the downfall of the DX when it comes to Textbooks.

    CONS/FOR FUTURE KINDLES: There's quite a few things that prevent the DX from being perfect, but maybe they can be added into future editions. First and foremost: Folders/Organization! Right now, all articles/blogs/newspapers/books get clumped together in one big menu. Why is there no way to organize these and place them in categories? This would be a huge improvement and would take very little effort. Also: Color. As I just mentioned above, color is a huge part of many textbooks, articles, etc. As soon as the technology is ready, a color kindle will be a huge improvement. A memory card slot was included in the first Kindle; however it was removed in the second and DX. This needs to be added back. Especially for those of us with large pdf libraries, we need the extra memory slot. Not to expand the memory so much as to just give us a portable way of getting articles onto the kindle. As of right now, you can be charged to have articles sent to the Kindle, or we can be near a computer. Why not add the memory card slot back and give us one more option? A better web browser, some sort of side-lighting for nighttime reading, touchscreen, thinner, and lighter are other suggestions I can think of to strive for.

    UPDATE: So, after using the DX for a while now, I have come to absolutely love it. Unfortunately, so has my girlfriend, so I don't get to see it much anymore.

    A few small things have come to annoy me though, so I would like to point those out. First, the screen rotation is becoming more and more annoying. I find the screen rotating on me many times when I don't want it to. Slightly changing the position of the device suddenly leads to the screen being rotated, and then it takes another few seconds of shifting it around to get it back the way you want. There should be a way to turn screen rotation off if you know you won't want it bothering you for a while. A simple setting could then be turned on again for normal use. (UPDATE: Apparently, you can disable the auto-rotation. User A.Nichols wrote in the comments: "Push the button with the Aa (to change font size) and you'll find the option to set change screen rotation from Auto (default) to portrait. I found the screen rotation to be annoying also when reading, it's easy to accidentally change the angle.")

    Another thing that has come to bother me is the screen lag. Very often, it's as though the screen sticks after you push buttons. You push them again and again, and then the screen finally unsticks and you fly through 3-4 pages. It's difficult to tell if the device didn't register the button you pushed or if it's just running behind. Unfortunately, this has resulted in my purchasing a book that I didn't mean to (amazon was nice enough to remove the charge though). Usually you get a "Would you like to cancel your order?" immediately after purchasing on the kindle, but this time I guess I pushed too much and flew through that screen too.

    Even with these small issues, I can't put my Kindle down. It is the best money I have spent in a long time.

    2-0 out of 5 stars OK device, terrible warranty, June 25, 2009
    I have had my Kindle DX for about two months and am mostly pleased with it--it works well for reading, and the display is easy to read--but I wish it had better support for PDFs. Yes, they display, but if you don't like the way it zooms, you can't do anything about it except rotate the device; you should be able to to some manual tweaking. Additionally, you cannot make annotations on PDFs (I understand why you can't highlight, but there's no reason you shouldn't be able to make notes for a page as a whole). I was hoping to use this more for grad school, but I don't think students or professionals with a lot of PDFs to read will find this useful, unless they are formatted specifically with the Kindle in mind.

    Additionally, my screen has recently developed a defect. Namely, I have horizontal and vertical lines, in addition to a portion of the display that is stuck black. I did not do anything unsual to my device like smash it or drop it, but Amazon refuses to replace the Kindle because they claim it is not covered under the 1-year limited warranty (even though, while I am not a lawyer, it certainly seems to be if you actually read it: "We warrant the Device against defects in materials and workmanship under ordinary consumer use for one year from the date of original retail purchase...."). Further, some people HAVE had their Kindles replaced (even when it is cleary their fault!), so it seems to be hit or miss depending on who you get on the other end of the phone. If you buy this device, I recommend treating it like a piece of glass: very carefully, always in a caseor sleeve, and DO get the extended warranty--except you'd be better off buying a warranty from SquareTrade at a much more reasonable price than Amazon's.

    In the mean time, I have a $389 brick that Amazon won't replace. You should NOT have to buy an extra warranty to have damage resulting from normal use and handling of the device be covered (and, depending on who at Amazon you talk to, you apparently don't). But because of the sketchy 1-year warranty, I cannot recommend that anyone buy this device; Amazon needs to stand by it better, with or without the extended 2-year warranty (although you'd be better off purchasing a similar third-party warranty for less). The device is OK (good, not great); the customer support with regard to warranty (they *were* good when I made an accidental purchase on the Kindle) is terrible.

    EDIT: After a month-long battle with customer service, they finally agreed to replace my device. It has been functioning fine since then, but my original complains about reading (particularly PDFs) still stands, and the warranty battle should have never happened.

    5-0 out of 5 stars Going to buy the GRAY!! Sorry Sony PRS-505... I'm moving on, June 11, 2009
    July 5 update: I've apparently been living under an e-reader rock because today is the first day I hear of the new dark gray DX. If you are contemplating the whether to go with the white or gray DX -- DON'T EVEN THINK ABOUT IT!! Get the gray!! The one thing I learned with my Sony Readers is that the darker the bezel -- the more contrast between the screen and the easier it is to read. So even if the screen and nothing in the e-ink display has changed and everything else is the same except for the color of the bezel -- the darker bezel will make for an easier more constrasty reading experience. FINALLY, Amazon gets a clue and realizes that the darker bezel will make for better reading though it may not look as "nice" as the white!

    FIRMWARE UPDATE as of 11.30.2009:

    I have now M-Edge Platform Jacket for Kindle DX (Genuine Leather--Pebbled Navy)--Back to School Sale!! because you can set the Kindle up to stand by itself on the table next to you or a lap desk. This makes it easier to to view music, knitting patterns, or just plain books (addressing some users complaints about it being "too heavy" to hold comfortably).

    I had been disappointed that the Kindle automatically goes to sleep after 5 minutes because if you are using the Kindle for reading patterns or music, it times out on you while you are still "working" on a page. However, Amazon come out with a new firmware release... the Kindle DX now stays on for 20 minutes before going into screen saver mode which is a big improvement.

    In addition, with the new firmware, you have the option of converting your PDFs to Kindle format -- which should address the lack of "zoom" and "annotation" features -- at least there is a workaround for now.

    UPDATE as of 06.16.2009: The Kindle may have just literally saved my career and saved my "backend". I had an interview yesterday and thought I knew where I was going. I'm one of the last dinosaurs not to have a Garmin and got lost. After circling around for awhile and getting more and more uptight about missing my interview, I remembered the Browser on the Kindle.

    On the K2, the browser was basically unusable because of the size. However, with the DX, I was able to go to Google Maps, look up the address and had my directions in just a couple of seconds. The map was rendered beautifully and the turn-by-turn directions could be bookmarked and even if my DX fell asleep, it awoke still displaying the directions. THANK YOU KINDLE!!!

    ---------------------------------------------

    The UPS truck arrived a couple of hours ago. I feel like a kid on Christmas Day and I got (just about) everything I wanted!

    My Sony PRS-505 has finally and officially become my "Emergency Backup Reader"

    My romance with ebook readers got off to a bumpy start when I got my first eInk device -- the Cybook Bookeen. Firmware issues and awkward buttons made it rather disappointing.

    Then I found true love with the Sony PRS-505. I loved the metal case. I loved the "Collections" (essentially folders features). I loved the looks and loved the display.

    However, the Kindle 2 woo'ed me with the size of its content collection. However, for reading I still ultimately preferred my Sony.

    Now, with the larger Kindle DX, I've set my Sony aside and there is a new love in my life. Let me count the ways:

    1. SCREEN SIZE: Reading on the Kindle DX vs 6" readers is like the difference between sleeping in a King sized bed vs a Twin Bed or riding in the backseat of a 2-door 1981 Honda Accord vs bucket seats in a Honda Odyssey. You feel like you have room to breath. The larger screen allows you to maximize the use of the real estate -- taking advantage of larger fonts and more white space. This makes text much easier to read -- even if you are just reading regular books.

    2. KEYBOARD: I also love that they have compacted the keyboard so that it doesn't dominate the overall appearance of the device. The smaller keyboard in no way compromises the ability to type. However, it improves the look by making the proportions more appealing and it means the device isn't horrifically larger than the 6" device.

    3. PDF + BIG SCREEN = LOTS MORE USES: I can transfer my knitting patterns (complete with knitting graphs and diagrams) and cello music to my e-reader.

    Using the Kindle for knitting -- I can highlight my place in the knitting pattern making it easier to work more complicated stitch patterns.

    I play cello and many of my music books are available in PDF format -- again the Kindle is wonderful for carrying all my music with me at one time. Turning pages is faster and easier than with a physical book. The kindle sits well on the music stand (though you want to make sure the tray of the music stand is taller than the Kindle or the Kindle will be "top heavy" making the bottom slide forward and potentially falling off the stand.

    4. SCREEN ROTATION -- You can rotate the screen in any direction and the page quickly re-orients itself. You can keep rotating 360 degrees and the screen follows you. The buttons remain the same but the thumb stick also reorients so that if you push right relative to the current orientation, that always means "page forward" no matter what direction you are in.

    If you are left handed and really bothered by having the buttons only on the right side, you can turn the device upside down and voila -- now your buttons are on the left side.

    5. BUTTON CONFIGURATION -- I actually PREFER having the next page and back page on the same side and in a contiguous location (as opposed to opposite sides of the device like the Kindle 2). It makes one-handed reading easier without having to reach over to the other side of the device to flip back and forth.

    6. SOLID feeling -- I like the heavier feel -- it is comparable to the heft of a hardbound book.

    7. READING While charging -- this sounds like a little thing but with the Sony, if you have the device plugged in for charging, you can't read on the device at the same time.

    There are a two things I still think the Sony does better:

    1. COLLECTIONS: It would be nice to have folders so that music could be separated from technical books which is also separated from knitting patterns etc. The absence of folders is even MORE annoying on the DX because you are likely to have a much more diverse collection of books/documents on there.

    2. EPUB SUPPORT: ePUB would allow users to acquire content from public libraries and virtually any other online ebookseller. But that is basically why Amazon isn't doing that... they WANT you to only get your content from them. Frankly, the ability to view PDFs without having to do a bunch of emailing back in forth is a huge leap forward so I guess it is sort of a "baby steps" thing.

    Sony has just really dropped the ball by not bringing out a larger format. You wouldn't think that a couple of extra inches on the screen would make that much of a difference in terms of your reading enjoyment. But then again, going from a 17" monitor to a 19" monitor is a huge difference in terms of usability of a computer screen.

    All in all -- Amazon really made a brilliant move with the DX. It is clear that they have really thought through the little things this time around and even the DX is a substantial improvement over the K2. I'm very very happy!

    [NCJAR]

    1-0 out of 5 stars DO NOT BUY THIS PRODUCT!! AMAZON WILL DENY WARRANTY WHEN UNIT DEFECTIVE!!, September 8, 2009
    My Kindle DX shipped July 30. I really liked it until today. There is a white out on about 1/12 of screen so you cannot read many words on the page and the text is running veritical and horizontal at the same time. The product has not been dropped or otherwise damaged during use. When I called Amazon Kindle support they said they had never heard of problem, even though I told them I found in a few seconds on the web. They asked me to reset, which I did, but problem persisted. I was then told that the problem was not covered by warranty!!!!!!!!!!! I asked how could they know that without looking at device and they said it was not on known list of manufacturer defects. They told me to not even bother sending it in for warranty service but if I wanted a new one, I could pay them $250.00!! I spoke to 2 supervisors at the Washington call center who gave me the same line. Amazon is not standng behind this product, and this is the worst example of poor customer service I have encountered. I asked them how could they make a technical diagnosis over phone and they had no good answer, just kept repeating that it was not a covered defect. I asked them why they would not just say "send it in and we will take a look at it", and they said it was a waste of time because it was not covered (even though they were 3000 miles away from unit and had not seen it) They wiggled when I demanded a written explanantion of denial of warranty service ( which to me is breach of contract.Kindle DX: Amazon's 9.7" Wireless Reading Device (Latest Generation) DO NOT BUY THIS PRODUCT. Amazon should be ashamed of itself. They have lost a valuable and up to now loyal customer.

    5-0 out of 5 stars Kindle DX first impressions from a former Kindle 2 user, June 11, 2009
    Here are my first impressions of the Kindle DX which I received earlier today. I've been using the Kindle 2 for the past three months and have loved it. It has improved the way I read by making it easy to download and try books before purchasing them, and allowing me to carry a variety of reading material with me. I was disappointed with the way it handled PDF's, which is important to me, so I sold the Kindle 2 and bought the DX.

    - The DX works like the Kindle 2 in terms of keys, navigation, joystick etc., except all the navigation keys are on the right.
    - Was concerned about lack of navigation on the left, but if you flip it 180 degrees, the display auto rotates and you can use your left hand. Very slick.
    - The DX is heavier, but is still comfortable to hold and read.
    - The overall size of the DX is not as big as I expected from the pictures on the web.
    - The digital ink looks similar on both, but a little sharper on the DX.
    - The DX works much better for PDF's overall. The bigger screen really helps here.
    - A complex powerpoint I converted to pdf looks just like it does on my pc except in b&w.
    - PDF's with columns work fine. I couldn't read them on the Kindle 2.
    - If you have a PDF with multiple columns, the print may appear small on the DX, and you can't adjust fonts in PDFs.
    - Newspapers are easier to read on the DX, especially pics and tables.
    - I downloaded a sample chapter of a textbook. I can see this working well for students.
    - The rotate feature is excellent on the DX; works as advertised.
    - The Kindle 2 weighs less and is more portable. If reading only books, I'd probably prefer the Kindle 2, given the lower price and size, and nav keys on both sides.

    Regarding the price, while I'd love Kindles to cost less, I think the price is reasonable. Here's how I justified it. I assumed I could resell the DX in 2 years for 50% of its purchase price, or $245. (50% seems reasonable based on the experience of Kindle 1). So my net cost is $245. The differentiating feature of the Kindle is the built in wireless capability. Not only is it elegant and integrated, it is also included in the purchase price. If unlimited wireless were priced separately, a reasonable price would be around $10/month. So effectively my out of pocket cost using the DX for 2 years is roughly equivalent to what the wireless would cost me if it was priced separately.

    Both the DX and Kindle 2 are good values. If you only read books, the Kindle 2 is probably better. If you already own a Kindle 2, and don't read PDF's, I recommend keeping your Kindle 2. If you read a lot of pdf's or newspapers, or you like to read with large fonts, you'll be happier with the DX. For my needs, I like the DX more.

    3-0 out of 5 stars Not "the answer" for academics and professionals, June 14, 2009
    As a grad student who is tired of printing out scores of journal articles or straining my eyes (and sucking battery power) reading them on a conventional computer screen, I have been eagerly watching the evolution of e-book devices waiting for one that would meet the needs of academics and professionals who are constantly reading, highlighting, and annotating documents and books. Because Amazon has marketed the Kindle DX as the e-reader for academics and professionals, highlighting its large screen and native PDF support, I finally thought that this was a product suitable for types like me and forked out the five hundred dollars for the DX. Alas, upon receiving the Kindle yesterday in the mail, it did not take long to realize that this machine is not the "answer" that I had hoped it would be. The reason is simple: no highlighting or annotating PDFs, Word documents, and other personal documents. It did not even occur to me to inquire, before purchasing the DX, whether highlighting and annotating PDFs and Word docs was possible. After all, one can easily acquire free software that enables one to do this on a computer (e.g. Skim for Macs), and in the Kindle DX press conference Amazon made a big deal about bringing reality to paperless workplaces, putting an end to the routine of printing out document after document. Well, surely one of the major reasons people print out documents is so that they can mark on them with underlinings, highlights, and notes. And given that one cannot do that for PDFs and other documents on a Kindle DX, Amazon's sales pitch is quite misleading: anyone who needs to interact with documents in the way typical of academics and professionals will still need to print out those documents (or make due on an eye-straining and power-consuming computer). Not only is it impossible to add an annotation to a specific passage in a PDF or Word document, one cannot add any annotations whatsoever, even at the page level (or document level, for that matter). Clipping/highlighting support is also completely absent. This is frankly unacceptable for a product marketed as the Kindle for students and professionals.

    As I'm sure other reviews here will attest, the Kindle DX is in other respects a beautiful and wonderful machine. If you just want to read PDFs, and have no desire to annotate or highlight them, then this would be a very satisfying device. And if you only need to annotate and/or highlight books (and can find the books you need in the Kindle store and can afford to buy them!), then the DX will be a wonderful piece of equipment to own. But if you are a typical student, academic or professional who needs to interact with your documents (and not just read them), and are looking for something that will replace the need to print documents or read them on your computer, the DX simply does not fit the bill. Wait for the next product, or for Amazon to update their firmware with respectable support for PDFs and other document types. I'll be mailing my Kindle back to Amazon tomorrow.

    1-0 out of 5 stars Kindle DX - Amazon's Apathy and Greed At Work, July 31, 2009
    First, let me say that I purchased and use my Kindle DX daily. I thought about how to accurately write this review for some time now. When it gets right down to it, all eReaders on the market - and the flood now hitting the market - use the same e-ink panels made by the same company, generally have the same features as far as reading an actual book, etc. When this was a niche product in a market with no real competition than the product would get a much higher rating. However, it is now a market with many choices. The only way to be fair about writing a review is to assume that there are some basic functions that MUST exist (wireless access, reader screen quality, basic zoom/bookmark features, etc.) that all e-readers today have. The review should be what is UNIQUE about the Kindle DX and review those features. If you just want to download a book and read it on an e-ink panel than every single e-reader on the market today will work fine.

    To that end, when looking at what makes the DX unique, I have to honestly say that I would not purchase this reader again - there are better options out there with several more just announced. After careful consideration, it becomes clear that Amazon just felt that they could get away with a sub-par device based on their name and position in the market.

    1) PDF issues: This is a larger format reader, presumably for the purpose of reading standard sized documents (8.5" by 11"). It is also being marketed heavily to students. Both of these demand native full PDF support. While the Kindle DX does render PDF's, it does so in an extremely crippled way. While I am well versed with the fact that some PDF's are rendered as images and the document itself does not contain links or text, most do. Despite that fact the Kindle does not allow you to change font size, add bookmarks, highlight text, use the dictionary feature, zoom in, use any links (i.e., the Table of Contents), etc. In other words, it presents that pages as pictures and provides absolutely zero "digital control" over the documents - the very features that someone would want to use an electronic reader instead of a hardcopy for. I purchased this device as an engineer because I have hundreds of PDF's (manuals, client systems documentation, etc.). I have found that I am completely unable to use it for the reason I purchased it for. Other readers treat PDF's as any other document allowing all the same e-reader functions and there is no reason - short of not wanting to pay Adobe a license fee - that the Kindle does not have this same functionality.

    2) File formats: While the Kindle DX does support several file formats, Amazon is one of the last holdouts to insist on providing content in a DRM protected proprietary format. They also do not read many industry standard formats. CHM and LIT are two of the HUGE formats that come to mind. Many publishers - especially of technology books - release in CHM format, essentially a slightly marked up HTML derivative that should be easy to render. MOBI and others come to mind as well - with over 1,000,000 public domain titles available from many web sites in these other formats. Yes, I understand protecting content - but Amazon has gone overboard in trying to lock down the Kindle to only offer "all the features" on their proprietary format. This locks you in to buying eBooks from the Kindle store. I understand the financial drive to do that - but most of us have documents that we have created, or content we have previously purchased for other platforms and have rights to, that we would like to read on the Kindle. Devices that restrict access to their own formats are generally given away or sold for a very low cost, with the understanding that the profit will be made on content (think about some of the original movie on demand set-top devices). Amazon is selling this as a standalone device, and needs to not intentionally cripple it. And yes, there are tools to convert file type - which usually result in formatting issues and the burden should be placed on the end user.

    3) File System Flaws: Amazon advertises the ability to hold 3,500+ books/documents (a HUGE exaggerating in and of itself). Even if it held 350 titles, the file system has a HUGE problem. There are no ways to create any type of folder structure. You have to go to a single large flat listing of the documents on the reader and hit Next Page over and over - a painfully slow process in and of itself - and hope do don't miss the title you were looking for and have to start over. Yes, the titles do start in alphabetical order, but they change based on most recently read being moved to the top. It is a ridiculous and unrealistic expectation to put more than a couple dozen documents on a device without any way to organize them into folders. The official Amazon reply: You can add tags and search by tags. Yep, you can - and if you want to take the couple weeks it would take to add tags to a couple thousand PDF's then you have far more free time than I do. The Kindle was purchased to save time - not to use my entire annual vacation time to organize it.

    4) No Card Reader: For some unknown reason, Amazon decided to not include any type of card reader. The memory can hold a large number of books - but PDF's can get to be 100MB or more if they are heavily diagrammed. The memory cannot be upgraded, so there should be some method to pop in a memory card. All of my cells phones have had this feature...and my $500 Kindle DX does not?

    5) Ergonomics: I admit that the e-reader market is emerging so there has not been a large pool of users to pull opinions from. That said, it seems that the Kindle DX made it through the art department and skipped the usability testing department. While it looks great and each to carry, the 5-way joystick thing, the lack of Next/Previous page buttons on both sides (that existed on previous models) and the absolute worst keyboard I have ever touched do not help the device. Again - being marketed to students and professionals - just look at the official page on the Amazon site. What is on the screen on the largest image there? It is a power plant diagram - not a page from a NYT Best Seller list. There should be a way to quickly type notes on things. There is no possible way a student could sit in a lecture and flip through pages and be able to type in notes and keep up with the class on this thing - completely unrealistic.

    6) No Desktop Application: While Amazon advertises that no computer is required, they leave out the fact that even if you had one there isn't really anything you could do with it. There should be some application similar to Apple's iTunes that will auto convert file formats and allow organization of files and folders (if they existed), allow backup in case the device is lost/stolen/damaged and needs to be replaced, etc. This is especially true for students that would desire a full sized keyboard to add notes to documents/books and sync with the Kindle.

    Bottom line: The Kindle DX is an absolutely great e-reader for someone that wants to simply read books, is comfortable buying only Kindle content and just desires a larger screen. This is what I am now using it for. To this end it works great. If this is your only expectation - then get out the credit card. If you have fantasies of using it to actually read PDF's with any functionality, store a large number of documents, use it in a classroom setting, etc. then get a different e-reader and sacrifice battery life and get a tablet or laptop and wait for the next generation.

    4-0 out of 5 stars Perspective from a biomedical researcher, June 12, 2009
    I don't generally write reviews, but I hope this one will be useful for other scientists who are contemplating a Kindle DX. My use for the DX will be different from most of the users who have posted reviews. I maintain a library of nearly 4,000 PDF manuscripts/grants/documents. I probably have minimal use for eBooks from the Kindle Store. The number of PDFs is constantly growing as new research manuscripts are published (and downloaded to my computer). My principle reasons for purchasing a DX were to:

    1) Carry the electronic equivalent of binders of PDFs with me when traveling. An iPod for PDFs. This is a metaphor that works for the way that I view an eReader, though it probably doesn't apply equally well to everyone.

    2) Have an easier way to read papers when traveling. Easier means not worrying about battery life, unfurling a laptop in a cramped airplane, or carrying a bag full of papers.

    3) Reduce eye strain from staring at a computer screen by moving serious reading from the laptop screen to the DX.

    From my preliminary use, I think the DX is a qualified success. Text in manuscripts looks great. Figures from manuscripts do not render well in portrait mode if there is a lot of detail; switching to landscape mode helps substantially. Zoom into individual images/sections of PDFs would be welcome.

    Navigating large numbers of PDFs from the home screen is currently clumsy. Lack of directory support to organize large numbers of files is an issue. I've read about users using complex naming conventions to use 'search' as an indirect way to find files. Renaming hundreds (or thousands) of files to make them easier to find is not a great solution. I suspect this will improve in time, either through a firmware update to this device or in the next generation of hardware.

    I'm also hoping against hope that one or more of the reference manager software providers (Bookends, I'm looking at you) realizes that their software is to the Kindle as iTunes is to the iPod. If I could manage the content of my Kindle through a reference manager, I would be thrilled. The idea of downloading a paper and syncing it in one step to the Kindle to take with me is really appealing. This wouldn't completely overcome the problem with a flat file hierarchy once the papers are on the Kindle, but it would help organize getting content onto and off the device.

    The biggest surprise to me is the functionality of the web browser. Yes, it is pokey to render pages. No, I wouldn't want to use it to web surf. But if I had a destination web site that is heavy on content, I think reading on the Kindle will be vastly superior to reading on the iPhone or other mobile/tablet devices. I do doubt, however, that wireless data access will remain free on the Kindle long-term. I can't imagine how Amazon will be able to continue subsidizing the data costs. I think that this is a feature that should be enjoyed while it lasts, but I wouldn't be surprised if it goes away at some point in the future.

    Though it adds another $50 to the cost, I think the matching case is attractive, functional, and creates an easy-to-carry package.

    So is it worth the high cost? I don't think I (or anyone) can really evaluate that until determining how well it integrates into daily work habits. I suspect that I will get heavy use out of it, but then I read a ton of PDFs. I do hope that the PDF support for dictionary lookup, highlighting, and annotation improves, but I base my review on what the product does - not what I would like it to do.

    Hope this helps other heavy PDF users! Read more


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    Brand new high quality 5mW green laser pointer. We ensure that every high power green laser pointer is hand calibrated and tested to output at least 29.99mw and thus offers the expected stunning power expected of a real constant wave green (532nm) laser pointer, much brighter to look at than a regular red laser pointer and always with a visible green beam. This high power green laser pointer will impress your coworkers, family and friends. Use it for your next presentation and everybody will know that you are ahead of the latest technology. Range in Darkness: 8-10 miles;Output Type: Constant Wave;Wavelength: 532nm;Output power: 5mWLaser color: Green Size: 159 x 13 mm;Operated by 2 x AAA batteries (included);Body material: Brass;Body color: Matte Black ... Read more


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    The innovative Fellowes W-11C with a safety interlock switch allows for safe and efficient shredding. If the lid of the machine is lifted, it stops automatically. Designed for light duty shredding in the home or home office, the Fellowes Powershred W-11C reduces documents to 5/32" x 2" higher-security confetti particles, and shreds up to 11 sheets per pass. Equipped with a 9" wide paper entry, the W-11C easily accepts standard letter or legal size documents. The durable steel cutters also accept credit cards and staples. Electronic auto start/stop features ensures quick & easy automatic shredder operation. Shredder has lift off lid for easy emptying. Reverse function easily removes over-fed paper. Fellowes provides a three-year warranty on the cutter. Includes :Wastebasket, machine with power cord, user's guide, warranty card ... Read more


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    Editorial Review

    Featuring one touch scanning, and requiring no PC, the Personal Photo Scanner/converter from Pandigital makes it easy to enjoy digital copies of all your favorite printed photos, up to 8.5x11. Designed for ease of use, scanned images are saved directly to SD card for quick and simple transfer to your digital photo frame or PC. Images are scanned as 600dpi full color JPEGs for incredible clarity and quality ... Read more


    19. Canon CanoScan 9000F Color Image Scanner
    Electronics
    list price: $249.99 -- our price: $186.95
    (price subject to change: see help)
    Asin: B003JQLHEA
    Manufacturer: Canon USA Inc.
    US | Canada | United Kingdom | Germany | France | Japan

    Editorial Review

    Canon CanoScan 9000F Color Image PERP9600X9600DPI 48BIT USB ... Read more


    20. BT-446 BP-446 Cordless phone battery for Uniden
    Electronics
    -- our price: $0.01
    (price subject to change: see help)
    Asin: B001RU18D0
    Manufacturer: Uniden
    US | Canada | United Kingdom | Germany | France | Japan

    Editorial Review

    Smartbatts products are trademarked,sold exclusively by TBC. Can be used for TRU446 TRU446-2 TRU448 TRU448-2 TRU4485 TRU4485-2 TRU5860 TRU5860-2 TRU5865-2 TRU5885 TRU5885-2 TRU8065 TRU8065-2 TRU8866 TRU8866-2 TRU8880 TRU8880-2 TRU8885 TRU8885-2 TRU8888 TRU9460 TRU9465 TRU9480 TCX-800 TCX-905 TXC-400 TXC-580 TXC-860A UIP1868 UIP1868-8 TCX-860 ... Read more


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